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NEWS: Iron Man Anime's US Debut in July, JP Debut in October


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Nerv1



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 601

PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 5:17 pm Reply with quote
I just find it odd that with all the anime versions of various comics being released in the US, no one really seems to acknowledge that these are in fact, anime.
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garfield15



Joined: 06 Apr 2009
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PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 5:22 pm Reply with quote
Well, this is a Japanese production so it would be an anime right?
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Kit-Tsukasa



Joined: 16 Mar 2006
Posts: 928

PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 5:56 pm Reply with quote
Nerv1 wrote:
I just find it odd that with all the anime versions of various comics being released in the US, no one really seems to acknowledge that these are in fact, anime.

Oxymoron here, but who is considered no one?
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mdo7
It's Over 9000!It's Over 9000!


Joined: 23 May 2007
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PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 6:12 pm Reply with quote
garfield15 wrote:
Well, this is a Japanese production so it would be an anime right?


Yes it is an anime. Did you forget Halo legends, Batman Gotham Knight are anime also even if it's a Western-Japanese production? Little Nemo has been reclassified as a anime because of being a USA-Japan production, Little Nemo came out in Japan first then came to USA 2 years later.

Quote:
I just find it odd that with all the anime versions of various comics being released in the US, no one really seems to acknowledge that these are in fact, anime.


Well half of our 80's and early 90's cartoon are considered anime before like Thundercats (because the animator that did Thundercats are now working for Studio Ghibli), Bionic Six (this is actually a Japanese-American production and it was directed by a well-known anime director, Osamu Dezaki). So yeah if Halo Legends, Batman: Gotham Knight, Iron Man anime can be considered anime. Why not Thundercats and Bionic Six? Little Nemo has just been reclassified as anime because of extensive research.
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Gratch



Joined: 07 Oct 2008
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PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 6:25 pm Reply with quote
mdo7 wrote:
Well half of our 80's and early 90's cartoon are considered anime before like Thundercats (because the animator that did Thundercats are now working for Studio Ghibli), Bionic Six (this is actually a Japanese-American production and it was directed by a well-known anime director, Osamu Dezaki). So yeah if Halo Legends, Batman: Gotham Knight, Iron Man anime can be considered anime. Why not Thundercats and Bionic Six? Little Nemo has just been reclassified as anime because of extensive research.


Except Thundercats was just animated there. Most 80s American cartoons were animated in Japan but very few should be considered anime since they were animated due to cheaper labor costs.
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RestLessone



Joined: 02 Aug 2009
Posts: 1031
Location: New York

PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 6:33 pm Reply with quote
Maybe it's because I haven't been involved in any in-depth Iron Man discussions...ever...but maybe people don't refer to it specifically as anime because they aren't really involved in the fandom. I don't think people necessarily have to acknowledge it. If they like the series but refer to it as a "cartoon", what's the problem? While it's great to expand the market, it's also bad to assign a stigma to a series (aka: people associating it with certain themes/series/etc) and treat it as anything more than a cartoon from a foreign country.

mdo7 wrote:

Well half of our 80's and early 90's cartoon are considered anime before like Thundercats (because the animator that did Thundercats are now working for Studio Ghibli)

Okay, I haven't heard that one, and it doesn't make much sense. It's like if an American comic artist moved to Japan and published a series in Japan for Japan. It doesn't mean that all of the previous works he/she did are suddenly "manga". Or all the American cartoons animated in Korea being called Korean cartoons.

Gratch wrote:

Except Thundercats was just animated there. Most 80s American cartoons were animated in Japan but very few should be considered anime since they were animated due to cheaper labor costs.

^Basically this. As I mentioned before, many American and Japanese studios get their works animated in Korea because it's cheaper.

In any case, I think anime should refer mainly to animated series that want Japan as a primary audience (cartoons from Japan, made for Japan). This one is more in a grey area, but nevertheless is a collaboration between American and Japanese studios and apparently consider both nations primary audiences. So, yeah, anime.
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I SHALL WIN THE INTERNETZ



Joined: 21 Mar 2009
Posts: 29

PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 6:39 pm Reply with quote
Quote:
Marvel Anime: Iron Man and Marvel Anime: Wolverine were slated to air in the United States next year.


on tv? or just staight to dvd?
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Niomo



Joined: 21 Jul 2009
Posts: 513

PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 6:54 pm Reply with quote
I SHALL WIN THE INTERNETZ wrote:
Quote:
Marvel Anime: Iron Man and Marvel Anime: Wolverine were slated to air in the United States next year.


on tv? or just staight to dvd?


Either way, I'm interested. I was hoping for it to be a full japan production (airing in japanese, etc), but I suppose I can wait.
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Yuki_Kun45



Joined: 26 May 2008
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PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 7:13 pm Reply with quote
Quote:
In any case, I think anime should refer mainly to animated series that want Japan as a primary audience (cartoons from Japan, made for Japan). This one is more in a grey area, but nevertheless is a collaboration between American and Japanese studios and apparently consider both nations primary audiences. So, yeah, anime.


I've heard that same sentiment from MAL Admins, it seems like a logical way to do it but I think you cannot determine if it constituents an anime just because it was made of Japanese audiences first. As anime expands and reaches new markets not all anime is going to be made strictly for Japanese audiences. So you can't gauge it simply by who it was made for.

In my opinion the best way to gauge what constitutes these hybrid series is the extent of the involvement of a Japanese company. There is a heavy difference between sending animation for overseas work and joint collaborations in areas like Halo Legends and Batman Gotham Knight. Both had heavy contributions from both sides, though Halo a bit more so. I think the amount animated by the studios can also be a factor in some occasions but also has to be determined.
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RestLessone



Joined: 02 Aug 2009
Posts: 1031
Location: New York

PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 7:25 pm Reply with quote
Yuki_Kun45 wrote:
Quote:
In any case, I think anime should refer mainly to animated series that want Japan as a primary audience (cartoons from Japan, made for Japan). This one is more in a grey area, but nevertheless is a collaboration between American and Japanese studios and apparently consider both nations primary audiences. So, yeah, anime.


I've heard that same sentiment from MAL Admins, it seems like a logical way to do it but I think you cannot determine if it constituents an anime just because it was made of Japanese audiences first. As anime expands and reaches new markets not all anime is going to be made strictly for Japanese audiences. So you can't gauge it simply by who it was made for.

In my opinion the best way to gauge what constitutes these hybrid series is the extent of the involvement of a Japanese company. There is a heavy difference between sending animation for overseas work and joint collaborations in areas like Halo Legends and Batman Gotham Knight. Both had heavy contributions from both sides, though Halo a bit more so. I think the amount animated by the studios can also be a factor in some occasions but also has to be determined.

Oh, I definitely agree. With anime expanding like it has, there's no doubt that certain series will have to be judged on an individual basis. I mostly use that as my broad term, and it admittedly misses a few shows, though covers the majority. I don't consider something like Thundercats anime when it was basically intended for a Western audience and had very little to do with Japan. It was the equivalent of today's cartoons being animated in Korea. So, one of the first things I ask myself is: who are they making this for and what companies are making it? The only shows left seem to be series based on foreign works.

For something like Halo or Iron Man, it's a collaboration that makes it an American-Japanese cartoon hybrid. It's both. Creators from both sides developed it and it's being released in both countries. I imagine that magazines in Japan have a few articles on it as well, that there is some form of hype. Even the images show a combination of stylistic tendencies. Though, a series should never be labeled by art; there are several Japanese artists who draw in a more "American" art style. But it's interesting to note, considering the circumstances.

As long as it's not "it looks like anime so it's anime", y'know? Smile
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GATSU



Joined: 03 Jan 2002
Posts: 12720

PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 9:11 pm Reply with quote
Don't really get why we have to wait a year, unless Marvel and Sony really want this series to be torrented that badly. Doesn't even make sense the Japanese get it first, when they don't even like much Marvel Comic-related stuff.
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mdo7
It's Over 9000!It's Over 9000!


Joined: 23 May 2007
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PostPosted: Fri May 28, 2010 11:25 pm Reply with quote
Gratch wrote:
mdo7 wrote:
Well half of our 80's and early 90's cartoon are considered anime before like Thundercats (because the animator that did Thundercats are now working for Studio Ghibli), Bionic Six (this is actually a Japanese-American production and it was directed by a well-known anime director, Osamu Dezaki). So yeah if Halo Legends, Batman: Gotham Knight, Iron Man anime can be considered anime. Why not Thundercats and Bionic Six? Little Nemo has just been reclassified as anime because of extensive research.


Except Thundercats was just animated there. Most 80s American cartoons were animated in Japan but very few should be considered anime since they were animated due to cheaper labor costs.


RestlessOne wrote:
Okay, I haven't heard that one, and it doesn't make much sense. It's like if an American comic artist moved to Japan and published a series in Japan for Japan. It doesn't mean that all of the previous works he/she did are suddenly "manga". Or all the American cartoons animated in Korea being called Korean cartoons.



Well after Little Nemo has been reclassified as anime, and also finding out that Thundercats has animation done by people who would later work at Studio Ghibli did raise question if Thundercats should be classify as anime. It's been up to dabate. Let's not forget there were anime coproduced by other countries like Ulyesses 31, Mysterious Cities of gold, Dogtanian and the three Muskehounds are all anime despite being produced with another country beside Japan. I know that Mighty Orbot, Bionic Six, and Skysurfer Strike Force should be classify as anime because they are Japanese/American coproduction. There is a difference between coproduction and oversea work.

Tiny Toon Adventure-although had help from TMS Entertainment, it's not a anime because it's not a Japanese/American co-production.

Bionic Six-it's a anime because this was a Japanese/American production and it was produced by TMS Entertainment and it was directed by famous anime director, Osamu Dezaki.
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Rinkwolf



Joined: 05 Apr 2009
Posts: 416

PostPosted: Sat May 29, 2010 1:18 am Reply with quote
Well, while we are on tangent. The who considers Dragon Ball Z anime. Believe it or not, but most of the people that saw DBZ when it aired didn't know what anime was and classified DBZ as cartoon (I know I did) it was several years later that some of those fans found out that was anime.
So, instead of asking why do we deny some american series being anime just because they were made in Japane. Why not ask, why would most of the American Audience call DBZ a cartoon? I also beleive some would say the same for Naruto and Bleach, though not as much as for DBZ.


Last edited by Rinkwolf on Sat May 29, 2010 1:19 am; edited 1 time in total
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Toddler Naruto



Joined: 16 Mar 2008
Posts: 498
Location: Fair Oaks, California

PostPosted: Sat May 29, 2010 1:42 am Reply with quote
Thanks for the epic news, but will the premiere be only Episode 1?
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Haterater



Joined: 30 Apr 2006
Posts: 1012

PostPosted: Sat May 29, 2010 11:09 am Reply with quote
Back then, I imagine most people would see 2D drawings as cartoons regardless of origin, which anime is also.
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