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Answerman - Why Are There So Many Chinese Anime Co-Productions These Days?


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Karl2



Joined: 16 Nov 2015
Posts: 25
PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 12:09 pm Reply with quote
I would not have problem with these if it wasn't because of the fact that not many of them have been very good, which is problem for people that want good entertainment, but great for China, because they love their Spectacle and not much else, which is why the are going to be 12 more Transformers movies.

Last edited by Karl2 on Mon Apr 10, 2017 12:40 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Engineering Nerd



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 309
Location: Southern California
PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 12:12 pm Reply with quote
I really appreciate Justin recognizes China's effort of licensing new AND old shows in last few years, many of these websites, like Bilibili (Chinese version of niconico), Iqyi, Youku, PPTV etc, has been paying top dollars for their licensing wars.


But this spring's licensing war for China is absolutely savage. Many websites are willing to pay ridiculous amount of fees in order to get exclusive streaming rights. For example, Saekano Flat, which was acquired by Iqyi, they spend 5.7 times more compare to their competitors in order to get the rights (they released the info on the social media), many even wonder can they recover the investment.

So, there is no secret of why there are so many Chinese co-productions consider this licensing bubble will burst sooner or later.


The question is....when can they find a decent source material to adapt
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mangamuscle



Joined: 23 Apr 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 12:20 pm Reply with quote
Quote:
It's no secret that China is an economy flush with money these days


Neither it is a secret that recently the chinese government has made it harder for their citizens to invest abroad as part of their "anti-corruption crusade". Therefore I would not expect any big budget co-productions and a shift towards 100% chinese animated productions. Heck, it the upcong RoboMasters: TAS is delayed you can bet it is because they are having trouble getting the money to pay for production out of china.

Quote:
just because they're made with Chinese audiences in mind doesn't mean that other audiences won't want them.


I would beg to disagree. I can't think of one said co-productions that would cause an uproar if they were not made available for legal streaming (or were limited to only one service) on the west. Crunchyroll streaming them has more to do with Kun Gao pushing said productions than the market demanding them, at least I do not see Amazon or Netflix (or Funimation or Sentai last year) fighting over those.

Engineering Nerd wrote:
The question is....when can they find a decent source material to adapt


When the chinese communist party releases its iron grip over local media writing so that really ineresating stories can start to be written.
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teferi



Joined: 16 May 2006
Posts: 264
PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 12:30 pm Reply with quote
mangamuscle wrote:
Quote:
It's no secret that China is an economy flush with money these days


Neither it is a secret than recently the chinese government has made it harder for their citizens to invest abroad as part of their "aint-corruption crusade". Therefore I would not expect any big budget co-productions and a shift towards 100% chinese anime productions. Heck, it the upcong RoboMasters: TAS is delayed you can bet it is because they are having trouble getting the money to pay for production out of china.

Isn't that article talking about investments? I'd assume that the amount that companies like tencent are spending are small enough they're not even on the Chinese government's radar. Otherwise the scope of what they're doing would be so large that you'd see it on the front page of every newspaper daily.
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Karasu-Lacryma



Joined: 20 Feb 2015
Posts: 51
PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 12:46 pm Reply with quote
As a student studying Chinese, really hoping for a good one on Crunchyroll one of these days.I suppose the fact that there's already plenty Japanese anime based on Chinese mythology and tales probably has something to do with it.
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FackuIkari



Joined: 31 Dec 2013
Posts: 187
Location: Argentina
PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 1:00 pm Reply with quote
Is there a reason why Quan Zhi Gao Shou (The King's Avatar) doesn't have a japanese dub just like Bloodivores, Soul Buster and Hitori no Shita? Or they are completely different things?
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BodaciousSpacePirate
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Joined: 17 Apr 2015
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 1:14 pm Reply with quote
Thanks for reminding me of how truly awful the Bloodivores logo looked. Confused
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DmonHiro



Joined: 06 Jan 2007
Posts: 2897
Location: Romania, Bucharest
PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 1:15 pm Reply with quote
I understand these co-prod are made with Chinese audience in mind, but they are still inferior in pretty much everything. How succesful are they in China? Do the Chinese actually think stuff like Bloodivores and The Outcast is good?
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Jonny Mendes



Joined: 17 Oct 2014
Posts: 371
Location: Europe
PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 1:29 pm Reply with quote
Is only a matter of time the Chinese anime bubble bursts.
After they have the knowledge, they will copy the method of making anime and they will drop Japanese anime and make their own anime like animation in China.

Is no secret that Chinese and Japanese are not really on friendly terms. And the Chinese leaders will like to get way from Japan as fast as possible and have their own animation industry.

And they will block anime titles they don't like, like these examples.

Terror in Resonance
Blood-C
High school of the Dead
Ergo Proxy
Parasyte
The Skull Man
Another
Inferno Cop
Afro Samurai
Tokyo Ghoul √A
Sword Art Online II
Tokyo ESP
Tokyo Ravens
Devil May Cry
RIN - Daughters of Mnemosyne
The Testament of Sister New Devil
Attack on Titan
Corpse Party
Strike the Blood
Death Note
Deadman Wonderland
Date A Live II
Psycho-Pass
Devilman Lady
School Days
Those Who Hunt Elves
Elfen Lied
High School DxD
Samurai Bride
So, I Can't Play H!
Girls Bravo: Second Season
Kanokon
Aesthetica of a Rogue Hero
Sakura Diaries
Black Butler
Claymore
Dance in the Vampire Bund
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Heishi



Joined: 06 Mar 2016
Posts: 424
PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 1:47 pm Reply with quote
But I always thought you couldn't be able to watch anime in mainland China. Shocked
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John Thacker



Joined: 28 Oct 2013
Posts: 427
PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 1:49 pm Reply with quote
Jonny Mendes wrote:
Is only a matter of time the Chinese anime bubble bursts.
After they have the knowledge, they will copy the method of making anime and they will drop Japanese anime and make their own anime like animation in China.


Certainly seems like a matter of time, but it's strange that despite doing a lot of contract work for both Americans and Japanese and having successful domestic manhwa and other potential sources for stories, South Korea domestic animation industry has been relatively unsuccessful in original productions. So you never know.
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Jonny Mendes



Joined: 17 Oct 2014
Posts: 371
Location: Europe
PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 1:57 pm Reply with quote
John Thacker wrote:
Jonny Mendes wrote:
Is only a matter of time the Chinese anime bubble bursts.
After they have the knowledge, they will copy the method of making anime and they will drop Japanese anime and make their own anime like animation in China.


Certainly seems like a matter of time, but it's strange that despite doing a lot of contract work for both Americans and Japanese and having successful domestic manhwa and other potential sources for stories, South Korea domestic animation industry has been relatively unsuccessful in original productions. So you never know.


South Korea is different from China because the animation industry is private and outside the influence of the government so the push for their own animation industry is not as big as in China, where the government is involved in everything.
Having easy access to Japanese anime make harder to South Korea have their own successful industry.
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Shiroi Hane
Encyclopedia Editor


Joined: 25 Oct 2003
Posts: 7080
Location: Wales
PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 2:09 pm Reply with quote
There was a Chinese-animated show on Crunchyroll last season - Spiritpact. I will confess that I dropped it after the first episode.
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AksaraKishou



Joined: 16 May 2015
Posts: 546
Location: End of the World
PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 2:22 pm Reply with quote
Forget about China, what i want to see is adaptations of my favourite Webtoons xD
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Hoppy800



Joined: 09 Aug 2013
Posts: 2180
PostPosted: Mon Apr 10, 2017 2:29 pm Reply with quote
With those Chinese animations, either they are really bad or they might be interesting, but you know something is missing from them.
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