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residentgrigo



Joined: 23 Dec 2007
Posts: 1345
Location: Germany
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 1:35 pm Reply with quote
Finally, someone called Midnight Anime for what they are "infomercials". This is basically where the OVA/OAV scene disappeared to but the factor budget was switched for (high) episode count.

It´s kind off weird that a few heavy hitters as Titan and Death Note air at night. HxH got to be a daytime show with similar content, for a big part of the run. Weird.
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Jonny Mendes



Joined: 17 Oct 2014
Posts: 468
Location: Europe
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 1:54 pm Reply with quote
residentgrigo wrote:
Finally, someone called Midnight Anime for what they are "infomercials". This is basically where the OVA/OAV scene disappeared to but the factor budget was switched for (high) episode count.

It´s kind off weird that a few heavy hitters as Titan and Death Note air at night. HxH got to be a daytime show with similar content, for a big part of the run. Weird.


But, for years many articles have been saying that. Late Night anime is made to promote Manga, LN, BD/DVDs, games.
for example:
animenewsnetwork.com/feature/2012-03-05
animenewsnetwork.com/answerman/2015-12-02/.95979
landofobscusion.blogspot.com/.../early-days-of-late-night-anime-...
etc:

Titan and Death Note are prime examples that using anime as infomercials to promote manga can work very well.


Last edited by Jonny Mendes on Mon Apr 24, 2017 1:56 pm; edited 2 times in total
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John Thacker



Joined: 28 Oct 2013
Posts: 500
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 1:54 pm Reply with quote
Quote:
Anime DOES air on different TV stations in different cities.


In Japan it's important to distinguish between TV stations and TV networks. The words shouldn't be used interchangeably.

Like in the US (but even more loosely) there are national networks (all with Tokyo flagships) and individual stations, which may affiliate with the national networks. Like in the US, there exist (or existed) independent stations as well as stations that affiliate with more than one of the national networks, showing some programs from each. Individual affiliates may show some or all of a national network's programs, and may show them at different times. They may be owned-and-operated by the national networks, or may not be.

TBS is based in Tokyo and MBS (Mainichi) is based in Osaka, and they have different ownership, but are the two biggest stations in the JNN network. Usually anime shown on TBS will also be on MBS, especially anything in the daytime hours. The Osaka affiliate for Fuji TV is Kansai TV, which has different owners than Fuji (the big Hankyu Hanshin holders that also owns the Hanshin Tigers and some private railroads). TV Osaka, OTOH, I believe does have the same owners as TV Tokyo.

Just like in the US, there are hours of the day where affiliates are particularly likely to show non-national network programming (think local news or syndicated programs like Jeopardy and Wheel of Fortune in the US, that show up at different times and on different national network affiliates in the US in different cities.) Late night, when late night anime is broadcast (in an infomerical type way) is one such.

Tokyo MX is unusual in that it is not a national network, being somewhat similar to a big city independent or superstation like TBS or WGN in the US.


Last edited by John Thacker on Mon Apr 24, 2017 2:01 pm; edited 1 time in total
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MarshalBanana



Joined: 31 Aug 2014
Posts: 1844
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 1:57 pm Reply with quote
residentgrigo wrote:
It´s kind off weird that a few heavy hitters as Titan and Death Note air at night. HxH got to be a daytime show with similar content, for a big part of the run. Weird.
I don't know how popular those titles were in Japan before they were adapted, but Hunter X Hunter was pretty popular in Japan for a number of years, and it seems like it aimed for a mass audience(possibly up until the content became to much for prime time TV), and the network may of made exceptions.
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rizuchan



Joined: 11 Mar 2007
Posts: 652
Location: Kansas
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 3:55 pm Reply with quote
Catching late night anime in Japan always seemed like a nightmare. I had a VCR timer to catch late night Adult Swim and early morning CN anime back in the day, and that was all on one channel. I can't imagine having to keep track of what airs when on what channel, especially since Japan notoriously doesn't start their shows on the hour/half. (Though I imagine DVRs these days make all these things significantly easier)

And there's no reruns, so what if you miss a show? Or start half way through? Just have to wait for the rental (or buy ultra pricey discs)? It always really surprised me that Japanese anime fans weren't as quick to jump on the streaming bandwagon because of all of this, but I guess they just take it for granted.
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Paiprince



Joined: 21 Dec 2013
Posts: 583
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 4:24 pm Reply with quote
rizuchan wrote:
And there's no reruns, so what if you miss a show? Or start half way through? Just have to wait for the rental (or buy ultra pricey discs)? It always really surprised me that Japanese anime fans weren't as quick to jump on the streaming bandwagon because of all of this, but I guess they just take it for granted.


They do reruns, especially when a new season of a long off the air series is on the way. There also exists Premium Cable channels like Animax and AT-X that puts back catalog on the airwaves every now and then.
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Mr. Oshawott



Joined: 12 Mar 2012
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 5:00 pm Reply with quote
I wonder how TV stations and TV networks determine a time slot to air an anime show (particularly a long-running one)...
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CheezcakeMe



Joined: 31 Dec 2015
Posts: 221
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 5:03 pm Reply with quote
rizuchan wrote:
Catching late night anime in Japan always seemed like a nightmare. I had a VCR timer to catch late night Adult Swim and early morning CN anime back in the day, and that was all on one channel. I can't imagine having to keep track of what airs when on what channel, especially since Japan notoriously doesn't start their shows on the hour/half. (Though I imagine DVRs these days make all these things significantly easier)


Yeah I'm going to assume it's like my parent's DVR, where they can just program it to record all of (Whatever) show from week to week and it'll never miss a show. Then when you're in the mood you can binge on the three month's worth of Dragon's Den it's built up or whatever. DVRs sound like a necessity for anime fans in Japan.
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#869984



Joined: 24 Apr 2017
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 6:14 pm Reply with quote
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mangamuscle



Joined: 23 Apr 2006
Posts: 1893
Location: Mexico
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 7:15 pm Reply with quote
rizuchan wrote:
Catching late night anime in Japan always seemed like a nightmare. I had a VCR timer to catch late night Adult Swim and early morning CN anime back in the day, and that was all on one channel. I can't imagine having to keep track of what airs when on what channel


If I remember correctly back in the VCR days the magazines with the schedule of what anime was going to air included a code of buttons to push (equal for all VCRs) so you could record said program. I suppose said code still exists nowadays for DVRs.
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leafy sea dragon



Joined: 27 Oct 2009
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 8:00 pm Reply with quote
All this talk about how viewers catch reruns or if they can't watch a show when it's scheduled is interesting, since the downside of serial programming is that you risk losing your viewers if they can't watch a particular episode, and I always wondered about the serial nature of most anime and its difficulty of catching reruns. It's interesting to me, also, that there is this infrastructure in place specifically if you can't watch an episode as it airs.

Maybe that's a part of what contributed to the success of Mr. Osomatsu: It's episodic, so people don't feel too frustrated if they miss an episode.
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sputn1k



Joined: 29 Sep 2016
Posts: 19
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 9:53 pm Reply with quote
John Thacker wrote:
Quote:
Anime DOES air on different TV stations in different cities.

TV Osaka, OTOH, I believe does have the same owners as TV Tokyo.


Yes, they form the TX network, along with TV Aichi, TVQ Kyūshū Hōsō, TV Hokkaidō, TV Setouchi, and BS Japan. The latter is their satellite channel. One of the main owners of the participating channels is The Nihon Keizai Shinbun, a very large financial news paper. AT-X is a subsidiary of TV Tokyo.

The other big networks are (all of them present in almost every prefecture with a local station and a satellite channel nationwide):
ANN (All-Nippon News Network), which is TV Asahi's network
FNN (Fuji News Network), which is Fuji TV's network
JNN (Japan News Network), TBS and MBS being the main stations
NNN (Nippon News Network), main stations being Nihon TV (Nittele) and YTV (Yomiuri TV)

As one can tell, the networks are primarily grouped by the news programming, with a large news paper company in the back.
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CR85747



Joined: 13 Oct 2014
Posts: 47
PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2017 6:42 am Reply with quote
John Thacker wrote:


Tokyo MX is unusual in that it is not a national network, being somewhat similar to a big city independent or superstation like TBS or WGN in the US.


Tokyo MX is part of JAITS, a federation of independently owned stations in the bigger cities which often carry the same programming, including late-night anime.
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Shiroi Hane
Encyclopedia Editor


Joined: 25 Oct 2003
Posts: 7169
Location: Wales
PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2017 7:09 pm Reply with quote
#869984 wrote:

No-one even mentioned it but.. that's been debunked long ago.
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epicwizard



Joined: 03 Jul 2014
Posts: 309
Location: Virginia
PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2017 10:11 pm Reply with quote
Quote:
If the TV network (or streaming service) is an advertising-free subscription service, they REALLY wouldn't want viewers to be able to see that show somewhere else, because then why would they sign up?

On the contrary, Yo-kai Watch is streaming on just about every single streaming service in Japan instead of streaming exclusively on say U-Next. I wonder how the production committee made that possible.

Additionally, the 16th series of Nintama Rantaro is streaming on Amazon Video Japan and Video Pass, while the 17th series is streaming on VOD Unite, Animate Channel, and Netflix Japan.
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