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The World Is Hers: How Hatsune Miku Is Changing Everything


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Hardgear



Joined: 27 Mar 2009
Posts: 397
Location: Colorado Springs, Colorado

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 5:08 pm Reply with quote
Great article!

This just shows that if you give anyone on the internet the power to create music (despite not being able to sing), out of all the thousands of songs that spawn there are bound to be a few real good ones. Music production of the future? I hope so. If anything products like Vocaloid give talented people the chance they need to be exposed and make it in the industry where they otherwise might have been stuck working dead end jobs until they die.

Also great to see some Luka respect, I have always viewed her as the best one (in voice, versatility, AND character design) Razz
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Quoss



Joined: 08 May 2010
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 5:16 pm Reply with quote
That was beautiful.
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Kimiko_0



Joined: 31 Aug 2008
Posts: 1579
Location: Leiden, NL, EU

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 5:24 pm Reply with quote
Thanks for a very nice article Smile

*makes plans for tomorrow to watch Megurine Luka on YouTube, and play some more Project Diva*
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DavidShallcross



Joined: 19 Feb 2008
Posts: 969

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 5:26 pm Reply with quote
I wonder how many years it will be until there are Vocaloids for most major languages of the world. Last I heard, Miku can't pronounce Italian properly -- the bit of Italian in Adesso e fortuna gets mangled. I'd like software that could sing troubador songs in Provencal, and there is probably a very small market that would want a version that could sing in Tuvan.
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GATSU



Joined: 03 Jan 2002
Posts: 12560

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 5:41 pm Reply with quote
Why do people behind such a cheerful character look so grumpy? Put on your game face, d00ds.
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satokoji



Joined: 14 Dec 2010
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 5:51 pm Reply with quote
Great article.

I believe it was Hiroki Azuma who claimed that otaku no longer create and just consume. I think he may have to reconsider.

Granted, the software must first be purchased (consumption), but so do paper and ink in order to create doujinshi. I think that Azuma's statement is built on the assumption that creation tools are limited and finite.

This just proves that modern otaku are just as creative as their predecessors and may branch out in areas once undreamed of or resigned to science fiction.
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Fabe



Joined: 09 Sep 2007
Posts: 162

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 5:58 pm Reply with quote
Hardgear wrote:
Great article!

This just shows that if you give anyone on the internet the power to create music (despite not being able to sing), out of all the thousands of songs that spawn there are bound to be a few real good ones. Music production of the future? I hope so. If anything products like Vocaloid give talented people the chance they need to be exposed and make it in the industry where they otherwise might have been stuck working dead end jobs until they die.

Also great to see some Luka respect, I have always viewed her as the best one (in voice, versatility, AND character design) Razz


So in other words Vocaloid is like a musical version of Poser,interesting way of looking at it. And like Poser it'll most likely be looked down upon as not being "real" art.
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kawaiibunny3



Joined: 10 Aug 2008
Posts: 423
Location: Houston, Texas

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 6:14 pm Reply with quote
DavidShallcross wrote:
I wonder how many years it will be until there are Vocaloids for most major languages of the world. Last I heard, Miku can't pronounce Italian properly -- the bit of Italian in Adesso e fortuna gets mangled. I'd like software that could sing troubador songs in Provencal, and there is probably a very small market that would want a version that could sing in Tuvan.


I believe the English vocaloids Prima and Tonio are capable of singing Italian (seeing as how they're built for opera and alot of operas are in Italian.)

actually all of the newer english vocaloids are probably better at singing the romance languages. they take a little longer to get just right, but they can do it

I know Carlo mentioned Korean, but the new Vocaloid3 software is apparently able to cover Spanish as well.
so its a start Anime hyper
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Cryssoberyl



Joined: 17 Jan 2009
Posts: 184

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 6:33 pm Reply with quote
Excellent article summing up Vocaloid, giving an overview of its history and direction.

Now if you could just write an article like this for Touhou, maybe I'd actually be able to understand something about that franchise other than LOADS AND LOADS OF CHARACTERS.
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Past



Joined: 14 Feb 2006
Posts: 3121
Location: Seattle bound (soon)

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 7:40 pm Reply with quote
Thank you Carlo, this is the article I was waiting for you to write that I remember you mentioning at the ANN panel. Well done. Both this article and the Miku Keynote gave a sense that what is happening with the whole Vocaloid phenomenon is unprecedented and very pioneering when it comes to the business side of it. I think the key phrase they mentioned that sums it up well is it's a "bottom-up" business model (rather than top-down). My interpretation of that is the real creative process is at the consumer level and the final product depends not on how it is sold but how the whole process can be made even better.
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gwern



Joined: 05 Nov 2009
Posts: 65

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 7:43 pm Reply with quote
satokoji wrote:
Great article.

I believe it was Hiroki Azuma who claimed that otaku no longer create and just consume. I think he may have to reconsider.


That sounds more like Toshio Okada. Vocaloid creations sound like a perfect illustration of Azuma's database: take this Vocaloid and lyrics, combine it with this Touhou melody, grab a serafuku outfit from the database and maybe an ahoge, and blam, you have some new otaku candy. All courtesy of the easy remixability of the database.

(And in any event, clearly such a statement would not be meant *literally*. One doujin would refute it! Probably the meaning would be more like 'otaku these days on average create less than older otaku did'. This could even be correct. With so many high-quality amateur productions online a click away, it has to be discouraging many marginal creators who would have created if the choice was between creating their own stuff or going without.)
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Anymouse



Joined: 18 May 2007
Posts: 685

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 8:10 pm Reply with quote
And the issue that Azuma critiqued is not so much lack of creation as a series of creative works that solely reference the "Database" and nothing form the real world or folklore.
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mdo7



Joined: 23 May 2007
Posts: 4157
Location: Maryland, USA

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 8:50 pm Reply with quote
This article and the story behind Miku Hatsune is amazing, I hope she can become a sensation in US just like in Japan (and some other part of the world). Very Happy
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configspace



Joined: 16 Aug 2008
Posts: 2842

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 10:10 pm Reply with quote
That's an interesting background on the Piapro ecosystem.
Quote:

What this all means is that there is a bustling creative ecosystem run almost entirely by the fans. Ultimately, that may be Crypton's greatest gift to the world: not Hatsune Miku or the Vocaloid software itself, but the way in which it is used. An entire form of entertainment has been built not by corporate overlords, but by its consumers.

Even more impressive is that every song on the setlist was, obviously, fan-made—not a product churned out by songwriters slaving away in Crypton's basement, but the creations of genuine musicians expressing themselves through the Vocaloid medium.

So true!

I do have to mention though, while understandable, "vocaloid" is sometimes mistakenly synonymous with Miku or Crypton Media. So it should also be noted that there are developers of Vocaloids other than Crypton Media, usually focused on more realistic and romance/latin based vocals (though they can also be used for Japanese). I list a some examples at
animenewsnetwork.com/bbs/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?p=1005576&highlight=vocaloid+beatles#1005576
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Past



Joined: 14 Feb 2006
Posts: 3121
Location: Seattle bound (soon)

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2011 10:42 pm Reply with quote
I have a prediction, and probably an inevitable milestone in this expanding pop-culture bandwagon anyway: I think in the near future we will see Vocaloid conventions (fan run events of course).
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