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Hey, Answerman! [2010-02-05]


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ABCBTom



Joined: 10 Sep 2009
Posts: 183
PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2010 5:01 pm Reply with quote
Stretch24 wrote:
Considering how irrelevant it is, it gets implied a lot. Is it realistic to expect the entire American anime community to be in the upper spending tier? Might that not be one reason why fansubs have flourished in the first place? Because people resent being expected to pay an inflated price for virtually identical goods? No doubt there are plenty of selfish people (including me, no doubt), who just want free entertainment, but that would be a simplistic explanation of the problem as a whole.

Here's the paradox: I consider anime to be fascinating and entertaining, I watch little but anime, yet I don't see it as having much of a monetary value. Often times after watching an episode I wonder if it had even been worth the 23 minutes of time which I had spent on it, much less dollars and cents. I seldom watch an episode twice, and wouldn't even watch most of them once if there was a significant fee attached. Yet somehow anime as a whole remains intriguing. Just because I assign a low price to anime doesn't necessarily mean I assign it a low value. My limitations aren't due to a lack of interest so much as to my not having much money to work with.

My basic argument is that not everybody has to be--or can be--one of the high paying fans, the ones who buy the DVDs and general merchandise. Not everybody with a sincere interest in anime can afford it. But since in the current system that's the only way any money will find it's way back to Japan, such not-so-wealthy people will always be vulnerable to accusations of not supporting the industry. But are they refusing to support, or balking at the high price tags? Since the law automatically puts them on the losing side, why not just tune out and go watch fansubs instead of arguing endlessly?


It's just a shame that anime and manga do have a monetary value to create. While not all fans may think anime is worth "money", it's unfortunate that the landlords, the utilities, the computer companies, the studio employees, the printers, the artists, et al find this "money" necessary.

I also see this comment about how those of us who purchase anime are incredibly wealthy because we're able to buy all of this expensive stuff. I see this often, so I'm thinking that there might be a slight misunderstanding about how this works. Maybe I'll buy a few DVDs a month, or splurge when the RightStuf or Robert's Anime Corner Store has a special. But I'm not buying everything. Far from it.

Essentially, for some of us, it we can't buy it, rent it, stream it legally, are unwilling or unable to import it from Japan, or are unwilling or unable to purchase the distribution rights from a licensor, that means we don't get to watch it. And I use the words "get to" advisedly. I did not watch One Piece until Funimation started putting it out on DVD. The show started in 1998. I did not see it until 2009. Eleven years, and I still managed to survive.

Maybe I'm being stupid because everyone else does it. Maybe I'll go ahead and torrent Legend of the Galactic Heroes, since I don't have $2,000 to drop. Do I think that the current system is the best distribution method? No. I don't think it's sustainable, and I think a lot of things need to change.

But let's not pretend that everybody's pirating, or that it's impossible to hold back, and not watch the newest shows, or that only the wealthy can support the industry. It's simply not true.
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rainbowcourage



Joined: 11 Apr 2007
Posts: 1216
Location: what is commonly known as "hell week"
PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2010 5:40 pm Reply with quote
Cait wrote:


But none of that makes me a fan, because that is not what the fandom has become. To anime fans, the entire medium is disposable. Some might buy the DVD or BD of their favorite title, or get merchandise, but there's no real interest or connection to owning it, to holding onto it (or to supporting the industry that creates it). I'm not in a hurry to see the next big thing. I always assumed I had time and it wasn't going anywhere. But I seem to be mistaken and, really, I'm not one of you and I probably never will be. That realization is sort of sad.


Actually, as a member of this "younger" fandom, my problem is entirely different. I really do want to own everything I've watched, but as of now I am in no way in control of my own finances. I have this owning thing--I think it comes from being a booklover; I love to collect things that I love. So while I might be picky about my anime (I don't watch just anything, I have to really like it) I do want to buy most of what I've seen at some point or another. Unfortunately up till now I've had to beg, borrow, and steal anything I've ordered because my parents are so adamant--firstly that I shouldn't waste my money on "crap" and secondly because everything is online now and we have to be careful with the credit cards. I have been slowly, grudgingly gaining ground by asking infrequently and offering my own money (my Bebop boxset is in the mail this week!) but I think it's only going to get worse considering the college bills about to come my way...

That said, I'm not averse to the latest shows coming out. But I am discerning about them. I don't try to watch all 18 shows in a season which is just ridiculous; at most I watch 3-4 coming out weekly.
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Stefnick



Joined: 26 Mar 2005
Posts: 48
PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2010 6:01 pm Reply with quote
animefan1238 wrote:
Stefnick wrote:
Quote:
and for once I'd like to find a Funimation title without Vic Mignogna in it


Baccano, Big wingup, Beck, Black Cat, Black Lagoon, Basilisk, Blassreiter, Blue Gender, Burst angel, Coyote Ragtime show, D.Grey-man, Desert Punk, El Cazador, Elemental Gelade, Ergo Proxy, Fate/ Stay Night, Fruits Basket, Gad Guard, The Galaxy Railroad, Ghost Hunt, Gungrave, Gunslinger Girl, Jyo-oh-sei, Kanon, Karin, Kodocha, Moonphase, Nabari no Ou, Negima, Origin, Romeo X Juilet, Rumbling Hearts, Sakura Taisen, Samurai 7, Slayers, Solty Rei, Speed Grapher, Spice and Wolf, The Story of Saiunkoku, Strain, Sasami, St. Frog, Shana, Tenchi Muyo, The Tower of Druaga,Witchblade, xxxholic
Rolling Eyes
And this is decent chuck of Funimation's catalog, This is not including those were he speaks a few lines or whose character was only present for one or two episodes. Enjoy.

heavy sigh...



Tuche! Vic is a good VA not the best but in the parts i have seen him in he did a good job in them. The problem is the studios don't seem to be hiring new actors but I am sure it is for financial reasons but I am sure once the economy gets better we might see a boom on new VAs comming out.


Well compare to when Funimation first started their talent puddle has become a pretty decent size talent pool. Seriously, if you think it is bad now watch some of the dubs from when the were called Production. They have progressed a great deal. I don't know, I always thought they had a pretty decent mix of popular, less-well known, and new voice actors. I for one like hearing some familiar voices but I may be in the minority.
Not sure if its financial reason are the cause of overuse of actor, seems like VAs are paid for the work they do. If you're paying for 20 actors, you're paying for 20 actors, regardless of how new they are or how big your talent pool is. I think it has more to do with time and performance, I think it was stated before, but they hire those who they know will do a good job and give them what they want in a timely matter. It is not like Funimation doesn't want to hire new talent, they have expressed an interest many times and they have had some new or lesser used actors playing prominent roles in their newer releases. I just think they have a hard time finding them. I remember watching a Youtube video with Chuck Huber, (talk about being in every original Funimation dub release, love him though) where he stated that he initially wasn't in Darker than Black but they had to fire the original guy because he couldn't deliver his performance correctly. Which makes me wonder if this is a frequent practice, that their new VA just couldn't give them a good performance and had to sacrifice originality for quality and promptness, and just went to the VAs they know are going to perform. You gotta remember they have only a few months to record, edit, mix, and what have you the anime. You got to be understanding. I don't know I've come across some anime where most of the cast a relative newcomers, under appreciated, or underused actors, with mixed results, I don't know maybe it was more on the director's part.
My point is I think they do mix it up a bit but certain VA's voices are just so recognizable and s/he maybe popular, so it easy to zone in on that particular VA when they show up, even if not a prominent role, so now you believe they're are in everything or ignore some actors that are actually in everything. I'm not saying that certain VA aren't used a lot, but it's not like Japan doesn't do the same thing or that you don't see the same twenty names scrolling in the credits for every American cartoons that comes on CN, Disney, or Nick. I find it strange we demand so much from English anime dubbing.
I like Vic, his performances are usually really good. He seems he has the more over-the-top and theatrical voice that fit well with Tamaki, but he can also easily slip in to more serious tone without it sounding awkward [note: I am not comparing him with the Japanese VA, but his performance was good in it's own right, so don't start]. Yes yes he doesn't have a much of voice differentiation, though Broly and Bui makes me think he has it in him, but his performance is good.


Last edited by Stefnick on Sun Feb 07, 2010 6:31 pm; edited 1 time in total
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ljaesch



Joined: 03 Apr 2009
Posts: 299
Location: Enumclaw, WA
PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2010 6:17 pm Reply with quote
I'm one of the people who believe in legally obtaining anime by buying DVDs; however, I'm not someone who is in a higher income bracket. In fact, I'm far from it. I have three kids to feed and clothe, a mortgage to pay, school lunches and fees to pay, utility and cable bills to pay, credit card bills to pay, etc. Between my husband's income as the main breadwinner of the family, and what income I bring in as a freelance writer, we can pay for all these things, but there's not a whole lot left for extras.

Of course, this means that I can't purchase as many anime DVDs as I would like. In fact, like I said earlier, I rely on my local library system for sampling much of the anime that I've seen. Of course, going this route means that I can't keep up with the most recent and cutting edge titles. But at least I can see some anime legally for free, and when I have the money, I can purchase some things that I have enjoyed.

I buy DVDs because I believe in supporting anime creators and studios. Even though I may not be able to purchase a whole lot, I know that what little I do buy ultimately supports these entities, even if it's only in a small way.

Even if I don't have the moral and legal things to think about, illegally downloading anime isn't in the cards for me; this is due to lack of time and not having the fastest of DSL connections. Plus, I also have kids who like to use my computer and use up bandwidth...
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Stretch24



Joined: 11 Dec 2005
Posts: 107
Location: Ohio
PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2010 7:04 pm Reply with quote
Sorry for implying that anti-fansub people have money to burn. I generalized fans into just two categories, which was probably unrealistic. I guess what it all comes down to is that when one person is paying for something, he/she probably would rather somebody else isn't getting it for free, which is perfectly understandable. It might also explain why nobody ever seems to switch sides from pro- to anti-fansub (or vice versa) despite the endless arguments that take place here.
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ABCBTom



Joined: 10 Sep 2009
Posts: 183
PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2010 8:54 pm Reply with quote
Stretch24 wrote:
Sorry for implying that anti-fansub people have money to burn. I generalized fans into just two categories, which was probably unrealistic. I guess what it all comes down to is that when one person is paying for something, he/she probably would rather somebody else isn't getting it for free, which is perfectly understandable. It might also explain why nobody ever seems to switch sides from pro- to anti-fansub (or vice versa) despite the endless arguments that take place here.


That's not quite true. I used to watch fansubs regularly. I even sent money into a fansubbing group, to pay for the cost of VHS tapes. I also had to pay for shipping. Think it was about $75 for 60 episodes of a show that would never be licensed in America: Kodocha.

When it eventually was licensed, I bought the special edition of the first volume, but then kinda let it fall by the wayside. I figured I could always pick it up later. Well, nobody bought Kodocha. Funimation learned shojo doesn't sell, and you can see how many shojo titles get licensed these days. I disenfranchised myself.

Japanese studios can now reasonably assume that no shojo shows have a market in America, which means no licensing dollars. Studios will now take this into consideration when deciding which projects to pursue.

Additionally, now I have no right to say "I hope Funi licenses Kimi no Todoke, so I can have a dub". If you don't buy Big Windup, you're telling the industry "Please don't license Cross Game". If you don't buy Lucky Star, you're telling the industry "Please don't license K-On". If you don't buy Macross, Dirty Pair, or City Hunter, you're telling the industry "Don't bother with anything before 2000." And then this information is passed along to the Japanese studios in the form of financial results and licensing fees, or the lack thereof.

The Japanese economy wasn't great shakes during the 1990s. It was known as the "Lost Decade" before they went and had another one. And yet there was vitality in the anime industry. So I don't buy the explanation that the economy is solely to blame for the sad state of the industry right now. I think the bubble got all of the studios excited. Japanese cool was going to take over the world. Then everything came crashing down.

Right now, I think the studios are scared. They don't want to change, and they want to blame the fansubbers for everything. They're paranoid, and they have the idea that they probably can't count on America and the R1 market for anything financially substantial. So they're going to milk the otaku market with a series of pander-fests with $60 special edition blu-rays. This is unsustainable, of course, but it's a way to survive.

Right now, I'd imagine our R1 voting dollars are worth quite a bit. Can you imagine what it would say to the anime industry if Eden of the East sold 3.5 million units, like the Animatrix did? Wouldn't that be a powerful incentive to change the direction things are going? But when no money is spent, the fansub crowd chooses to be passive and just accepts whatever is produced by whoever is paying the bills.

I didn't really need an argument to change sides. The evidence is compelling on its own.
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dewlwieldthedarpachief



Joined: 04 Jan 2007
Posts: 751
Location: Canada
PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2010 9:28 pm Reply with quote
hissatsu01 wrote:
Stretch24 wrote:
"Supporting the anime industry" is fine and dandy, but if I were in Japan all I'd need to do to contribute my support is fast-forward through the ads. I'm sure they were hoping for more than that, but it would still be perfectly legal. The R1 industry costs a lot more to support. Or maybe I should say the viewer has fewer options about the degree of support that he or she will offer. And somehow I get the message that my genuine devotion to anime is supposed to be directly proportional to the amount of money I spend on legal DVDs. Thus people with money to spare are better otaku than those without. And someone who buys a full price DVD rather than one on sale is better yet. Anime is an expensive hobby here in North America, at least if you want to keep it legal.


Why do I get a sense of deja vu? By any standard being an anime fan in Japan is far more expensive than just about anywhere. If you're not going to buy anything, and download everything, the costs are the same worldwide - whatever your internet access and storage space costs. But if you're buying anything, Japan is far more expensive. Aside from popular children's shows and shows that have been running for decades, anime is not paid for by commercials. It's paid for by sales of DVD/Blu-ray and merchandise. No more sales equals no more anime.

As for whether spending more makes you more of a fan or a better fan, it's irrelevant. Anime is a business, and devotion alone doesn't pay the bills. Having fans is nice, but having paying fans is necessary.


OR if you live in Japan you can just record the HD broadcasts for the costs of the relevant hardware and a TV subscription.
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dizzon



Joined: 22 Sep 2008
Posts: 338
PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2010 10:19 pm Reply with quote
ABCBTom wrote:
I used to watch fansubs regularly. I even sent money into a fansubbing group, to pay for the cost of VHS tapes. I also had to pay for shipping. Think it was about $75 for 60 episodes of a show that would never be licensed in America: Kodocha.

When it eventually was licensed, I bought the special edition of the first volume, but then kinda let it fall by the wayside. I figured I could always pick it up later. Well, nobody bought Kodocha. Funimation learned shojo doesn't sell, and you can see how many shojo titles get licensed these days. I disenfranchised myself.

Japanese studios can now reasonably assume that no shojo shows have a market in America, which means no licensing dollars. Studios will now take this into consideration when deciding which projects to pursue.

Additionally, now I have no right to say "I hope Funi licenses Kimi no Todoke, so I can have a dub". If you don't buy Big Windup, you're telling the industry "Please don't license Cross Game". If you don't buy Lucky Star, you're telling the industry "Please don't license K-On". If you don't buy Macross, Dirty Pair, or City Hunter, you're telling the industry "Don't bother with anything before 2000." And then this information is passed along to the Japanese studios in the form of financial results and licensing fees, or the lack thereof.

The Japanese economy wasn't great shakes during the 1990s. It was known as the "Lost Decade" before they went and had another one. And yet there was vitality in the anime industry. So I don't buy the explanation that the economy is solely to blame for the sad state of the industry right now. I think the bubble got all of the studios excited. Japanese cool was going to take over the world. Then everything came crashing down.

Right now, I think the studios are scared. They don't want to change, and they want to blame the fansubbers for everything. They're paranoid, and they have the idea that they probably can't count on America and the R1 market for anything financially substantial. So they're going to milk the otaku market with a series of pander-fests with $60 special edition blu-rays. This is unsustainable, of course, but it's a way to survive.

Right now, I'd imagine our R1 voting dollars are worth quite a bit. Can you imagine what it would say to the anime industry if Eden of the East sold 3.5 million units, like the Animatrix did? Wouldn't that be a powerful incentive to change the direction things are going? But when no money is spent, the fansub crowd chooses to be passive and just accepts whatever is produced by whoever is paying the bills.

I didn't really need an argument to change sides. The evidence is compelling on its own.


It doesn't look like you post very much.......Let me personally encourage you to post more often. Wink
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eyeresist



Joined: 02 Apr 2007
Posts: 995
Location: a 320x240 resolution igloo (Sydney)
PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 12:15 am Reply with quote
Prince? Ha!



dtm42 wrote:
You were being a prick. A prick who abused his position just to engage in slander for his own amusement.

Not just his own amusement!

Trolls should be mocked. Either they will perceive the irony and learn by this that their behaviour is socially unacceptable, or they will fail to perceive the irony, and so it doesn't matter.
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LordByronius
ANN Columnist


Joined: 06 Feb 2002
Posts: 861
Location: Philippe for America! He is five.
PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 4:50 am Reply with quote
ABCBTom wrote:
It's just a shame that anime and manga do have a monetary value to create. While not all fans may think anime is worth "money", it's unfortunate that the landlords, the utilities, the computer companies, the studio employees, the printers, the artists, et al find this "money" necessary.

I also see this comment about how those of us who purchase anime are incredibly wealthy because we're able to buy all of this expensive stuff. I see this often, so I'm thinking that there might be a slight misunderstanding about how this works. Maybe I'll buy a few DVDs a month, or splurge when the RightStuf or Robert's Anime Corner Store has a special. But I'm not buying everything. Far from it.

Essentially, for some of us, it we can't buy it, rent it, stream it legally, are unwilling or unable to import it from Japan, or are unwilling or unable to purchase the distribution rights from a licensor, that means we don't get to watch it. And I use the words "get to" advisedly. I did not watch One Piece until Funimation started putting it out on DVD. The show started in 1998. I did not see it until 2009. Eleven years, and I still managed to survive.

Maybe I'm being stupid because everyone else does it. Maybe I'll go ahead and torrent Legend of the Galactic Heroes, since I don't have $2,000 to drop. Do I think that the current system is the best distribution method? No. I don't think it's sustainable, and I think a lot of things need to change.

But let's not pretend that everybody's pirating, or that it's impossible to hold back, and not watch the newest shows, or that only the wealthy can support the industry. It's simply not true.


i'm sorry i just wanted to say that your comment was succinct, intelligent, lovely, and reasoned.

you do not belong on the internet. please leave.
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eyevocal



Joined: 21 Jul 2009
Posts: 137
PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 10:12 am Reply with quote
Kidnicky wrote:
Not only does it boggle my mind that someone would admit to paying 30 dollars for a show about poorly drawn robots and poorly drawn breasts,it absolutely shocks me that one of the reasons for doing so was apparently some sort of moral code you have. I just don't see how watching the lowest,cheapest form of cartoon softcore in the guise of a power ranger knockoff is somehow morally acceptable as long as you don't rent it,stream it,or dl it.
I was alone when I watched it,yet still turned it off out of embarrassment.

I bought it. I waited for the singles to go on sale first because I haven't much money and there was no way in hell I was gonna buy ADV's stripbox version (or of any other series, for that matter), but I bought it. Why? Because it amused me. Yes, its fan service level hits trashy level every now and again. When I'm in the mood for it, that stuff gives me a wicked grin. Is this the only type of anime I like? No. Sometimes I want depth, and I collect and watch anime with that. Sometimes I just want a good cheap titillating laugh.

Another more recent OP with sound effects: Karin. They throw in splash noises when Karin has a nosebleed geyser.
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Dark Elf Warrior



Joined: 26 Nov 2007
Posts: 228
PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 8:52 pm Reply with quote
About the wishful thinking anime being mainstream question: It's not that people are racist and judge anime as something for "geeks", people just aren't interested in it. They have other things that they like better. Also, mainstream doesn't always mean popular. Things that are mainstream usually don't last long. They're just the current trend, and then they fade into obscurity, or people make fun of it or something. Where as popularity lasts. You see it all the time in music. Aqua was mainstream because of they're song "Barbie Girl", but there are many today who now hate the song, and make fun of Aqua.Another example is Spice Girls, Backstreet Boys, Hanson and Aarn Carter. They were all mainstream, but they no longer make an impression. They were just a trend. They were all known at one time, but now no one cares. Whereas bands like The Doors, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, Queen, The Eagles, Led Zeppelin all from the 60s and 70s, are well-known and popular even today and make an impression.

So, anything being mainstream can end up a double-edged sword. Sure, it's acceptable and known-for now. But the minute it's no longer the trend, it's will be considered trash. That's what trends are I'm afraid.

And why are some even worried about this? Why sit there wishing for anime to be "mainstream"? Just sit back, watch your anime and enjoy it while you can.
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leming400



Joined: 09 Feb 2010
Posts: 1
PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 1:21 pm Reply with quote
first i'm new and i made this account for one reason. to contact answer man.

this is because of this"Anime is just a nerdy geek niche right now. Will we see the day when anime and live action movies can be conversed about with the non-initiated without the otaku stigma and as another form of storytelling? I revel in the idea of anime reaching mainstream audiences who aren't tainted by the prejudices most are filled with towards it."

i unwittingly kinda converted all my mates to anime when they found my manga stash. i was embarassed as hell but when they statred asking if they could borrrow it i thought WOOT, since then they've gone on to become fully fledged otaku of there own. so I think half the problem with the otaku stigma is that the otaku themselves think it's there when it isn't, at least not all the time.
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AnimeAngel00



Joined: 06 Jun 2006
Posts: 22
PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 1:42 pm Reply with quote
I kinda wish I got the taco bell joke...it was funny, but there were folks I knew that wrote letters and complaint like that to companies in that exact manner. (-__-)*

Dang...I just got tacoed....

No well thought out comment about the anime industry since everyone pretty much wrote out a lot of thoughts I was already thinking...so much main stream anime in the US is catered to men and kids. I wish there were more slice of life and magical girl series that would be produce and broadcast. Speaking of which, I wonder if the next sailor moon or cardcaptor sakura is in the making....I haven't seen a good magic girl series since.
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Greed1914
It's Over 9000!It's Over 9000!


Joined: 28 Oct 2007
Posts: 3570
PostPosted: Tue Feb 09, 2010 1:44 pm Reply with quote
ABCBTom wrote:
Stretch24 wrote:
Sorry for implying that anti-fansub people have money to burn. I generalized fans into just two categories, which was probably unrealistic. I guess what it all comes down to is that when one person is paying for something, he/she probably would rather somebody else isn't getting it for free, which is perfectly understandable. It might also explain why nobody ever seems to switch sides from pro- to anti-fansub (or vice versa) despite the endless arguments that take place here.


That's not quite true. I used to watch fansubs regularly. I even sent money into a fansubbing group, to pay for the cost of VHS tapes. I also had to pay for shipping. Think it was about $75 for 60 episodes of a show that would never be licensed in America: Kodocha.

When it eventually was licensed, I bought the special edition of the first volume, but then kinda let it fall by the wayside. I figured I could always pick it up later. Well, nobody bought Kodocha. Funimation learned shojo doesn't sell, and you can see how many shojo titles get licensed these days. I disenfranchised myself.

Japanese studios can now reasonably assume that no shojo shows have a market in America, which means no licensing dollars. Studios will now take this into consideration when deciding which projects to pursue.

Additionally, now I have no right to say "I hope Funi licenses Kimi no Todoke, so I can have a dub". If you don't buy Big Windup, you're telling the industry "Please don't license Cross Game". If you don't buy Lucky Star, you're telling the industry "Please don't license K-On". If you don't buy Macross, Dirty Pair, or City Hunter, you're telling the industry "Don't bother with anything before 2000." And then this information is passed along to the Japanese studios in the form of financial results and licensing fees, or the lack thereof.

The Japanese economy wasn't great shakes during the 1990s. It was known as the "Lost Decade" before they went and had another one. And yet there was vitality in the anime industry. So I don't buy the explanation that the economy is solely to blame for the sad state of the industry right now. I think the bubble got all of the studios excited. Japanese cool was going to take over the world. Then everything came crashing down.

Right now, I think the studios are scared. They don't want to change, and they want to blame the fansubbers for everything. They're paranoid, and they have the idea that they probably can't count on America and the R1 market for anything financially substantial. So they're going to milk the otaku market with a series of pander-fests with $60 special edition blu-rays. This is unsustainable, of course, but it's a way to survive.

Right now, I'd imagine our R1 voting dollars are worth quite a bit. Can you imagine what it would say to the anime industry if Eden of the East sold 3.5 million units, like the Animatrix did? Wouldn't that be a powerful incentive to change the direction things are going? But when no money is spent, the fansub crowd chooses to be passive and just accepts whatever is produced by whoever is paying the bills.

I didn't really need an argument to change sides. The evidence is compelling on its own.


I'm going to go ahead and do like dizzon and Brian and fully applaud this post. It's statements mirror my own, and I'm quoting the whole thing because I really want people to take a look at it.
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