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YotaruVegeta



Joined: 02 Jul 2002
Posts: 1050
Location: New York
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 5:18 am Reply with quote
So here's a final question, because my head spins from all this:

What do you see as worse, theft or copyright infringement? Should one have stiffer penalties over another, or should they both be equal?
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gingi789



Joined: 05 Feb 2008
Posts: 56
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 5:58 am Reply with quote
YotaruVegeta wrote:
So here's a final question, because my head spins from all this:

What do you see as worse, theft or copyright infringement? Should one have stiffer penalties over another, or should they both be equal?


Short answer: theft. Long answer: both. I haven't been disagreeing with you guys this entire time. I don't think people should be able to watch anime without paying for it. My only issue is availability. (and if you want to, you can apply this to J Dramas, K-Dramas, etc).

If something is readily available where you live (i.e., you can go to best buy, or go on rightstuf), then it is illegal and wrong to download it. For example: since a series like Elfen Lied is readily available and fairly easy to pick up, then downloading it off the internet is stealing it. It's denying the American licensor and the people associated with it the money that they worked for. Even if you think a series is crap, you still watched it. You should pay for it. For example, i loaned a friend the series Castle a few weeks ago. After getting it back, she told me she ripped it to her computer. And i'll be honest, that made me upset, because it was like i had unwillingly participated in piracy, which i don't like.

My only exception (and you may call this splitting hairs, but i think it's a large difference) is when said product is not available where you live. Say there's J-Drama series A, and you've looked and looked, can't find it at any retailer. You've seen an episode or two, liked it, and want to watch more. If that's the only way you can watch the rest, then why shouldn't you? It's not entitlement, because you've done what you could to watch the series legally. So you find it, and download it.

Now whether or not that answers your question.......sorry, i did the best i could Very Happy
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teh*darkness



Joined: 16 Feb 2007
Posts: 901
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 7:52 am Reply with quote
I don't feel like reading all six pages of comments, just one will be enough, and maybe someone else already brought this up... but to all the people asking "are you, Brian, really saying I should buy stuff blindly, without watching it first?", I would say the answer is no. He said, and many people quoted, support what you like, don't pay for what you didn't like. He's not condoning or condeming watching fansubs or reading scanlations with that statement.
If you watched Code Geass in fansubs and you liked it, then buy it when it's available in your area. If you watched part of it and dropped it cause you didn't like it, then you shouldn't feel a huge need to support it (maybe buy what you watched, just to be fair, though that isn't always financially feasible). If you watched part of Code Geass, and didn't like it, but watched it all anyway, there's something wrong with you and you need to get out more.
It's really a simple premise. If you like it, support it. And if you don't like it, for the love of anything and everything holy and/or divine, stop watching it so that a crappy show doesn't get inflated view counts, leading it to get licensed because it appears to be popular when it's going to end up selling as well as a rock to a miner.

As for the new Answerfans question, it seems to me to be slightly leaning towards those people who were, until recently, reading stuff on sites like OneManga, as most people who don't read scans don't really know of artists until their work is released domestically, in which case, and especially in these economic times, means they are already popular or well-known.

gingi789 wrote:
For example, i loaned a friend the series Castle a few weeks ago. After getting it back, she told me she ripped it to her computer. And i'll be honest, that made me upset, because it was like i had unwillingly participated in piracy, which i don't like.
It's funny you mention that. A few months back, my brother told me he was buying a Blu-Ray drive for his computer, so he could just rent movies and rip them instead of buying them. As a result of this, I informed him that I would not be letting him borrow any of my Blu-Rays, as I paid for them, and don't feel like letting him rip permanent copies of what I spent my money on. So, I feel you on this point.

gingi789 wrote:
My only exception (and you may call this splitting hairs, but i think it's a large difference) is when said product is not available where you live. Say there's J-Drama series A, and you've looked and looked, can't find it at any retailer. You've seen an episode or two, liked it, and want to watch more. If that's the only way you can watch the rest, then why shouldn't you? It's not entitlement, because you've done what you could to watch the series legally. So you find it, and download it.
While I'll agree with you that if you truly can't find it, then it could be flimsily justified to watch it by illegal means, since that could lead to it looking popular and getting licensed (as I mentioned above), but I can't agree with the bolded statement. Watching something illegally because you can't watch it legally and you WANT TO WATCH IT is pretty much a perfect example of entitlement. You have no grounds to demand the right to watch the show, so to say "I'll watch it illegally since no one has given it to me for free on tv, or provided it to me in my language at a cheaper price than it would cost to import it", is entitlement. Now, if you were to buy the imports and watch a fansub or read a scanlation, then that, imo, is like buying an import video game, and using an online translation to be able to actually enjoy it. You're getting to enjoy it in a way you can understand it, and you're supporting it.
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gingi789



Joined: 05 Feb 2008
Posts: 56
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 8:20 am Reply with quote
teh*darkness wrote:
I don't feel like reading all six pages of comments, just one will be enough, and maybe someone else already brought this up... but to all the people asking "are you, Brian, really saying I should buy stuff blindly, without watching it first?", I would say the answer is no. He said, and many people quoted, support what you like, don't pay for what you didn't like. He's not condoning or condeming watching fansubs or reading scanlations with that statement.
If you watched Code Geass in fansubs and you liked it, then buy it when it's available in your area. If you watched part of it and dropped it cause you didn't like it, then you shouldn't feel a huge need to support it (maybe buy what you watched, just to be fair, though that isn't always financially feasible). If you watched part of Code Geass, and didn't like it, but watched it all anyway, there's something wrong with you and you need to get out more.
It's really a simple premise. If you like it, support it. And if you don't like it, for the love of anything and everything holy and/or divine, stop watching it so that a crappy show doesn't get inflated view counts, leading it to get licensed because it appears to be popular when it's going to end up selling as well as a rock to a miner.

As for the new Answerfans question, it seems to me to be slightly leaning towards those people who were, until recently, reading stuff on sites like OneManga, as most people who don't read scans don't really know of artists until their work is released domestically, in which case, and especially in these economic times, means they are already popular or well-known.

gingi789 wrote:
For example, i loaned a friend the series Castle a few weeks ago. After getting it back, she told me she ripped it to her computer. And i'll be honest, that made me upset, because it was like i had unwillingly participated in piracy, which i don't like.
It's funny you mention that. A few months back, my brother told me he was buying a Blu-Ray drive for his computer, so he could just rent movies and rip them instead of buying them. As a result of this, I informed him that I would not be letting him borrow any of my Blu-Rays, as I paid for them, and don't feel like letting him rip permanent copies of what I spent my money on. So, I feel you on this point.

gingi789 wrote:
My only exception (and you may call this splitting hairs, but i think it's a large difference) is when said product is not available where you live. Say there's J-Drama series A, and you've looked and looked, can't find it at any retailer. You've seen an episode or two, liked it, and want to watch more. If that's the only way you can watch the rest, then why shouldn't you? It's not entitlement, because you've done what you could to watch the series legally. So you find it, and download it.
While I'll agree with you that if you truly can't find it, then it could be flimsily justified to watch it by illegal means, since that could lead to it looking popular and getting licensed (as I mentioned above), but I can't agree with the bolded statement. Watching something illegally because you can't watch it legally and you WANT TO WATCH IT is pretty much a perfect example of entitlement. You have no grounds to demand the right to watch the show, so to say "I'll watch it illegally since no one has given it to me for free on tv, or provided it to me in my language at a cheaper price than it would cost to import it", is entitlement. Now, if you were to buy the imports and watch a fansub or read a scanlation, then that, imo, is like buying an import video game, and using an online translation to be able to actually enjoy it. You're getting to enjoy it in a way you can understand it, and you're supporting it.


Fair enough. To be honest, that's what i did with Gantz before Dark Horse licensed it (though i only got through the first 6 volumes), and I got Gunslinger Girl the same way (well, volumes 6+).

Oh, and as for the answerfans question......probably Hiromu Arakawa. She's the mangaka for Fullmetal Alchemist, and has been doing some other works since then (i think Hero Tales is still ongoing). It might be too early to tell (her body of work isn't that big) but I liked FMA, so i think she'll be pretty good Smile
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agila61



Joined: 22 Feb 2009
Posts: 3213
Location: NE Ohio
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 11:20 am Reply with quote
YotaruVegeta wrote:
So here's a final question, because my head spins from all this:

What do you see as worse, theft or copyright infringement? Should one have stiffer penalties over another, or should they both be equal?


The damage done by a single act of theft would seem to be greater than the damage done by a single bootleg copy of the same work, since the loss in the first place is not just the income from the item but also the cost of item, and it takes multiple acts of bootlegging to result in one lost sale.

On the other hand, the activity of OneManga and a volunteer who uploads material onto sites like that is worse than the action of someone shoplifting some food in the supermarket ... there is only so much that a single shoplifter can carry, while a single upload can support millions of acts of copyright piracy.

gingi789 wrote:
My only exception (and you may call this splitting hairs, but i think it's a large difference) is when said product is not available where you live. Say there's J-Drama series A, and you've looked and looked, can't find it at any retailer. You've seen an episode or two, liked it, and want to watch more. If that's the only way you can watch the rest, then why shouldn't you? It's not entitlement, because you've done what you could to watch the series legally. So you find it, and download it.


But that is entitlement: you are arguing that you are entitled to have access to it, and if the industry does not make it available, that entitlement gives you the right to watch the download.

Once the right to decide whether it can be copied is take out of the hands of the creator and put in the hands of the copier, what is the guarantee that it stops with "but only when it is unavailable"?

We have already seen in various piracy discussions the "when an unedited version is unavailable" ... someone else can use, "except when Shinigami is translated to Soul Reapers" or "except when mild cursing is not translated to make the character swear like a veteran sailor", and of course then there is "except when its not available fast enough, cheap enough, and with enough extras".

Indeed, in that case one thing it does is spoil the market for niche manga and anime in that country, since a big part of what makes niche translations viable are quick sales based on pent up demand. "I'll watch it bootleg if it is not available" means there is no pent up demand, and so makes it substantially less likely that it can be made available.
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CCSYueh



Joined: 03 Jul 2004
Posts: 2707
Location: San Diego, CA
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 2:19 pm Reply with quote
Gingi-sorry. My computer was being difficult. I think I was trying to reply to you & azhani who the quote came from, but my computer had stuff running in the background so I couldn't get it to respond & just restarted & obviously forgot I was talking to 2 not one person. You were debating the existance of Onemanga which I did cover. disregard the last part & Azhani can repond if s/he so chooses.
However, as I said to Zin-you are the only one who has to live in your skin. If you accept it's ok to download (legal streams aren't in this. If you're watching crunchyroll, you're legal) if the title isn't in your area, that's your thing.
I believe in karma-what goes around comes around so if that is true & what you are doing IS wrong, you'll get yours as we all will. It's not my place to judge anyone & indeed I do believe we all pay for what we do. Maybe getting to the store 10 minutes after they closed is payback for something you did-maybe downloading if that is deemed by whatever as a negative. I get frustrated by what I see as a lot of people giggling gleefully as the "cut" in front of the rest of us into the anime line to see whatever they want, but I am satisfied karma will get them. I just hope their selfishness doesn't cost me something I love.
YotaruVegeta wrote:
What do you see as worse, theft or copyright infringement? Should one have stiffer penalties over another, or should they both be equal?


Part of why I'm agnostic.
I never got that whole "stealing a pen is as bad as murdering someone because it's a sin." No. there are levels. Stealing a loaf of bread because one is starving is different from Bernie Madoff.
Copyright infringement is the problem. It makes it sound like a minor inconvenience, but realistically it is theft of a sort couched in legaleeze. If you are trying to design a character to use in a commercial pitching your product that is so close to Mickey Mouse, lawyers come into the picture, you were trying too hard ti walk the fine line. If you have just a generic mouse in your commercial then Disney shouldnt' care. But Mickey is THEIR mouse & considering Disney has a certain brand recognition that could be ruined if you're trying to use him to pitch say-adult movies then yes, Disney has the right to protect their product & the damage could be irreparable. What can you say is proper damage controll for a 5 yr old popping a porn video in the machine because the company threw a knock-off Mickey on the cover?
Infringement sounds like stepping onto someone;'s toes or bumping into them, not "stealing" the use o a service from a provider, you have "stolen" the use of that show. I get my $6.50 Regal ticket from my union & go to a movie per the restrictions on the ticket, I'm saving about half the cost of a fricken ticket, but the theater still gets something for my ticket. If you download Expendables the weekend it opened, it's good for you because you don't have to pay the theater which pays the studio & you probably aren'r GOING to pay to see it in the theater now you've seen it. MAYBE you'll buy the dvd when it comes out, but had you not downloaded it, the theater would have gotten the theater ticket price from you.
There really is no way around it. Downloads are a way to avoid the expense one would normally have to go thru to get something. If they didn't exist, you would have to spend a lot more time, money & effort getting anime by importing it from Japan yourself.
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azhanei



Joined: 21 Aug 2010
Posts: 78
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 3:19 pm Reply with quote
CCSYueh wrote:
azhanei wrote:
Manga companies, otoh, have issues with dangling the proverbial carrot only to snatch it away. Bad enough some titles in a series get published once a year -- works for 350-page text novels, not so much for something you can read in an hour -- but then there's this common scenario. You're bought vol. 1. Loved it. Bought vol. 2-6 like clockwork (never mind 2-19). And then ... nothing. The year goes by; you start digging through amazon.com, the publishers website, ANN, for any news of the next release. Only to find out, oh, they cancelled it.
So let's see, $100 gone. Two, five, ten years gone. And you, dear reader, are left stuck not ever knowing what's happened to these characters you've grown to care about. There comes a point where you’re frustrated and tired of gambling hard-earned money and your investment of time on a product that seems to do this far too much. And then you stop buying anything.

Sorry ... Utter words. "XXX dropped the Shana books! I'm NEVER buying anything from them again!"
Sorry about editing your quote. For some reason the scroll isn’t working properly in the reply and it’s making editing nigh impossible. I’m having to type my posts in Word and then paste.

Looks like you figured out you were attributing the quote to the wrong person. You’re also oversimplifying the issue. This isn’t some 12-year-old stomping her foot because she didn’t get her way. This is basic consumer goods economics. If the consumer feels as though the supplier isn’t holding up its end of the bargain, the consumer‘s confidence wanes. There’s a point where other, more dependable means of entertainment competing for that slice of the consumer’s budget wins out. I made it clear I don’t condone illegal/unethical modes of getting around that issue. I was pointing out the issue exists and it’s a valid part of the problem US manga publishers are having in maintaining revenue.
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Sunday Silence



Joined: 22 Jun 2010
Posts: 2047
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 5:45 pm Reply with quote
azhanei wrote:
If the consumer feels as though the supplier isn’t holding up its end of the bargain, the consumer‘s confidence wanes.


THANK YOU.
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agila61



Joined: 22 Feb 2009
Posts: 3213
Location: NE Ohio
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 6:11 pm Reply with quote
azhanei wrote:
This is basic consumer goods economics. If the consumer feels as though the supplier isn’t holding up its end of the bargain, the consumer‘s confidence wanes.


Its also basic consumer goods economics that you cannot sink endless funds into goodwill without going bankrupt.

Those are the perils of a niche market. Its why publishers nowadays are so reluctant to start long series unless they are real blockbusters.

The basic economics of print is that the only way that the only way to increase release cycles across the board is if more people buy the titles and the only way to drop fewer titles is if more people buy the titles. The economics of print runs is hard on niche markets like manga outside of Japan

The economics of digital distribution may be kinder, but while this discussion can cycle through an indefinite number of times in a couple of weeks, actually hammering out the details of a commercially viable electronic distribution system takes a minimum of six months, even for a distributor that already has digital rights, longer for a prospective distributer that needs to get rights.

And those details have to be hammered out ... even electronic distribution needs to have a way to cover rights and localization costs.
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Sunday Silence



Joined: 22 Jun 2010
Posts: 2047
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 6:54 pm Reply with quote
agila61 wrote:
azhanei wrote:
This is basic consumer goods economics. If the consumer feels as though the supplier isn’t holding up its end of the bargain, the consumer‘s confidence wanes.


Its also basic consumer goods economics that you cannot sink endless funds into goodwill without going bankrupt.

Those are the perils of a niche market. Its why publishers nowadays are so reluctant to start long series unless they are real blockbusters.

The basic economics of print is that the only way that the only way to increase release cycles across the board is if more people buy the titles and the only way to drop fewer titles is if more people buy the titles. The economics of print runs is hard on niche markets like manga outside of Japan

The economics of digital distribution may be kinder, but while this discussion can cycle through an indefinite number of times in a couple of weeks, actually hammering out the details of a commercially viable electronic distribution system takes a minimum of six months, even for a distributor that already has digital rights, longer for a prospective distributer that needs to get rights.

And those details have to be hammered out ... even electronic distribution needs to have a way to cover rights and localization costs.


And we then come back to the eternal question: where is this mythical "Middle Ground?"
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agila61



Joined: 22 Feb 2009
Posts: 3213
Location: NE Ohio
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 7:37 pm Reply with quote
Sunday Silence wrote:
And we then come back to the eternal question: where is this mythical "Middle Ground?"


On piracy versus the rights of the creators, there is no middle ground. Negotiation with the creators or their agents to gain agreement on new ways of doing things is of course valid, but respect for the rights of the creators to make the final yes or no decision is not negotiable.

"Or else we can't do business with you" is a legitimate ultimatum. "Or else we will trample your rights" is not.

On the problem of marginal publishing runs in niche overseas markets hitting the wall where they cannot be continued, even as the domestic market is ample to continue the publishing runs ...

... the middle ground is authors and Japanese publishers relaxing their insistence on translation approvals in advance in return for clear labeling of the distinction between approved and unapproved translations. That is what opens up the opportunity to crowdsource legit volunteer translations and the opportunity for an online crowdsource translation community site to act as a publisher that feeds a majority of their revenues back as rights income to the creators, without heavy localization overheads.

Given that, no series would ever have to be entirely abandoned because the later numbers can no longer generate the sales to refund the costs of a print run. That would also more easily accommodate Print On Demand of crowdsourced translation, as "try before you buy" is automatically available in the online version.

The minimal financial overheads of that system would also allow a legit online manga aggregator to extend the scope of their offerings beyond the titles that can support a professional translation, providing the diversity that the bloodsucker pirate sites have relied on for a big part of their success.

And I apologize if this reads like me soapboxing again on the same vision of the future of the industry, but Sunday Silence did kind of ask, and it is kind of on the topic of the third letter.
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gingi789



Joined: 05 Feb 2008
Posts: 56
PostPosted: Mon Aug 23, 2010 9:45 pm Reply with quote
CCSYueh wrote:
Gingi-sorry. My computer was being difficult. I think I was trying to reply to you & azhani who the quote came from, but my computer had stuff running in the background so I couldn't get it to respond & just restarted & obviously forgot I was talking to 2 not one person. You were debating the existance of Onemanga which I did cover. disregard the last part & Azhani can repond if s/he so chooses.
However, as I said to Zin-you are the only one who has to live in your skin. If you accept it's ok to download (legal streams aren't in this. If you're watching crunchyroll, you're legal) if the title isn't in your area, that's your thing.
I believe in karma-what goes around comes around so if that is true & what you are doing IS wrong, you'll get yours as we all will. It's not my place to judge anyone & indeed I do believe we all pay for what we do. Maybe getting to the store 10 minutes after they closed is payback for something you did-maybe downloading if that is deemed by whatever as a negative. I get frustrated by what I see as a lot of people giggling gleefully as the "cut" in front of the rest of us into the anime line to see whatever they want, but I am satisfied karma will get them. I just hope their selfishness doesn't cost me something I love.


That's a point i can accept. And believe me, i've heard so many reasons why people download copies of anime that are available here (including the "well, i could never afford to buy it anyway, so why should i have to pay for it?") And it aggrivates me to no end. I was on disc 3 of Shana when Geneon announced it was not going to distribute in the US anymore. I had to make a mad rush (because this was before Funimation took over the Geneon titles in the US) to find discs 4-6 because they wouldn't be available anymore. (just out of curiosity, have you ever had anyone ask you "why do you bother to buy anime? You can get it online for free") I was glad to hear that ADV had morphed into Sentai filmworks. Even though i dislike the way that Funimation packages their anime (please, an artbox or something! Even viz gives out figures), i buy it whenever i find a series i like (Shibkane Hime Smile) I love bandai, media works, and noizomi because they're still releasing extra goodies with their boxsets Very Happy And i hope NIS America (the people who lisenced Toradora and Persona 3) make it and keep licensing more, because i love anime. And i hate to think that people just steal it (i'm talking about licensed in the US), and that that might cause it to go away.

I'm not going to rehash the discussion that we've been having for the last 2-3 pages, because i think we can agree to disagree. Though, i have to ask a question: was there really someone that boneheaded at Comic-con to ask the creators "why bring it over when everyone's already seen it illegally?" The only question i've heard at a convention that comes close to being as embarassing for the person being asked is, at AX 2010, a guy asked Yu Asakawa "what was the most embarassing thing you've had to say in an H-game?"
(she replied that she'd never done one, so she wasn't going to answer that)

I'd swear you could hear crickets chirping Very Happy
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teh*darkness



Joined: 16 Feb 2007
Posts: 901
PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2010 2:44 am Reply with quote
gingi789 wrote:
...(just out of curiosity, have you ever had anyone ask you "why do you bother to buy anime? You can get it online for free")...


I wanted to chip in here, jut because this has happened to me. Once, many years ago in a Best Buy, I was browsing the anime section, and there was a 13-14yo kid in the aisle as well, and as I was looking at series, he walked over and started commenting on the one I was holding (I think it may have been a volume of the first Full Metal Panic series). He then tried to inform me that I could download the whole series online for free and he could tell me where to go. I replied that I knew perfectly well I could download it, but I like the series and I want to support it, which is why I'm in the store in the first place. He quickly made his way out of the aisle shortly after that.
More recently, while grabbing the newest volume of Fullmetal Alchemist at a Borders, I had a girl, probably also around 14 years old, walk right up to me out of the blue, and say that I should read the manga online, cause it's further ahead and they don't censor everything like Viz does. Then she just turned and walked off... that actually kind of shocked me.
I look forward to the day that people who seem to enjoy anime and manga don't actively try to kill the industry by recommending others pirate everything.
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leafy sea dragon



Joined: 27 Oct 2009
Posts: 7163
Location: Another Kingdom
PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2010 3:46 am Reply with quote
Well, you have to keep in mind--these are kids and teenagers. They very likely have no idea how businesses work, or they don't care. That girl talking about FMA, in particular, has a sort of disdain for the American localization industry as a whole. I'm glad I haven't had to deal with anyone like this whenever I was at Best Buy, Fry's Electronics, Borders, or Barnes & Noble.

I wonder if kids like these are the ones who want companies like Viz and FUNimation to die so they can have their anime and manga pure and untainted by greedy Wunclers and their fat Cuban cigars.

My dad used to rent videotapes so he could copy them. He had a pair of VCRs set up specifically to do such a thing. Of course, he also had an expensive home theater system, the most premium HBO package the 90s could bring, and equipment so high quality they were near indestructible (and defy planned obsolescence to continue working up to this day), so he was definitely a step above the anime and manga pirates.

I'd like to see someone who torrents and downloads anime and manga for free who watches stuff on high-end stuff like my father did. It would be something I've never seen before.
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edzieba



Joined: 13 Dec 2006
Posts: 704
PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2010 7:51 am Reply with quote
leafy sea dragon wrote:
I'd like to see someone who torrents and downloads anime and manga for free who watches stuff on high-end stuff like my father did. It would be something I've never seen before.
I have built my own HD-projector-based home theatre system, own several JP imported blu-rays along with other 'premium' goods like the Stand Alone Complex soundtrack box (the one in the transparent plastic case with a Tachikoma thumb-drive), the Broccoli FLCL box, and the Blue Submarine 6 soundtrack CDs, as well as several shelves full of licensed (or unstranslated) DVDs, BDs, manga, novels and a handful of doujinshi. I also download fansubs and manga scanlations. I have never purchased a bootleg. I do not use aggregate rehosting sites like onemanga/mangafox, mainly due to quality and inconvenience issues, the same reason I don't use crunchyroll (other than most shows I'm interested in not being available in the UK anyway). I usually import NTSC DVDs rather than local PAL DVDs due to the problems in format conversion, and I own comparatively very few Funimation and Manga Ent DVDs due to their general poor quality. I expect a licensing company to be able to do a better job mastering a DVD than I can, and am therefore loathe to buy substandard releases.
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