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Mr. Oshawott



Joined: 12 Mar 2012
Posts: 6773
PostPosted: Sun Mar 09, 2014 7:23 pm Reply with quote
Sakura Shinguji wrote:
Funny thing, their Lucky Star dub spends its time doggedly mimicking the original Japanese (strict script translation, untranslated names, untransliterated jokes, unexplained references, full honorifics, proper name pronunciation, etc.) moreso than perhaps any other dub out there... yet it also features across the board some of the best and most natural performances and line reads and "interaction" between the cast members.

In addition to Lucky Star and The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya, there are other earlier anime shows that has maintained correct pronunciation of Japanese names in their English versions, such as Cyber Team in Akihabara and Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha.
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Setis



Joined: 05 Jun 2007
Posts: 21
PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2014 4:39 pm Reply with quote
Chagen46 wrote:
Quote:
It's pretty rare to ever see another voice actor because each person is scheduled to come in separately to record their lines.


Why do English dubs do this? The Japanese can get the actors in the booth at the same time. How the hell can you expect someone to act well if they have no interaction with everyone else? I like dubs, but they seem to constantly obstruct the actors' abilities to do well.

I remember the Strike Witches dub commentary mentioning that Funi actually brought all the actress' in and had them watch the show with scripts in hand. No wonder that one sounded better than most.


My understanding is because it's so technical in matching lip flaps and such that they can simply do it faster one at a time. If you have two actors in a scene and one flubs up....you have to redo the scene with both actors. Now take a scene with 5 actors....if any one actor flubs it you have to redo the whole scene....Pre-lay doesn't worry about this because they have nothing to match.

The whole "acting by yourself" thing is why good directors are so important, and why it's so strange that anime dubbing (the MOST technical and difficult of all dubbing) is also the least paid.
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kanechin



Joined: 21 Jan 2012
Posts: 447
PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2014 7:38 pm Reply with quote
[quote="Setis"]
Quote:
The whole "acting by yourself" thing is why good directors are so important, and why it's so strange that anime dubbing (the MOST technical and difficult of all dubbing) is also the least paid.


because it's not HOLLYWOOD with their overrrated actors/actresses and $20 million flops.
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dtm42



Joined: 05 Feb 2008
Posts: 14082
Location: currently stalking my waifu
PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2014 8:32 pm Reply with quote
I thought Japanese casts did their lines together because hiring out studio space is expensive and the producers save costs by doing everything at the same time?
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gatotsu911



Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 456
Location: US of East Coast
PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 4:19 am Reply with quote
I just wanna say that it's really cathartic to realize that a bunch of other people dislike Bang Zoom for the exact same reasons I do. Echo_City and merr, your posts are solid gold and practically worth cut-pasting to a Word document and saving.
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supersqueak



Joined: 14 Aug 2009
Posts: 184
PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 8:58 am Reply with quote
Man voice acting is the pipe dream of any young anime fan. It certainly was mine when I was a kid. I especially entertained the idea when I was little because I live in just the right part of Texas for it. Justin is right though it is highly unlikely one could make a living out of it. Definitely these kids should listen to That anime show on itunes it gives you some insight on the behind the scenes stuff straight from the mouths of voice actors. These voice actors wear all different kinds of hats at their studio to get payed like directing engineering or script writing even some of the really great ones that have been around for a while have day jobs they need to keep to make ends meet. I say if you are actually good and you live where the action is already go for it because the worst that can happen is you will fail so that is no big deal. Maybe you could make it like as a hobby or something if you are very lucky. Don't expect to become a voice acting super star though. You are not going to be able to just appear out of nowhere with no experience and take jobs away from people who have been at it for decades already.

Last edited by supersqueak on Wed Mar 12, 2014 8:26 pm; edited 1 time in total
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streexanime



Joined: 22 Nov 2004
Posts: 78
PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2014 11:19 am Reply with quote
Quote:
The cult of celebrity that has opened up around voice actors at anime conventions has long struck me as bizarre, and a little bit off-putting.

Meet Scott McNeil and hang out with him, then you know why he has such a large and dedicated fan following.
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Agent355



Joined: 12 Dec 2008
Posts: 4578
Location: Crackberry in hand, thumbs at the ready...
PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 5:07 am Reply with quote
Interesting stuff re: Bang/Zoom. I'll take it with a grain of salt, but keep it in mind the next time I hear a really disappointing dub.

Voice actors with fanbases are charming and know how to work a room. Their panels can be a lot of fun. What's wrong with respecting an entertainer?

Way back when, my family had a Daewoo VCR that would pull all sorts of shtick--eject tapes when we hit play, fast forward when told to rewind and then suddenly eject the tape, that kind of stuff. When I learned that Daewoo made *cars* I could only imagine what it'd be like to have a car that went into reverse when you hit the gas and then ejected the driver out on the street Razz
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yuna49



Joined: 27 Aug 2008
Posts: 2927
PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 8:24 am Reply with quote
One little-mentioned difference between US Nielsen and Japan's Video Research is how video recorders are treated. Nielsen counts DVRs in its ratings and offers data on delayed viewing from DVRs. Last time I checked Video Research only counts live viewers and ignores DVRs. For anime programming running late at night this method almost certainly underestimates the total viewing audience. (If my information is out of date, it is because Video Research has removed the detailed descriptions of its ratings methodology from its website.)

For anyone interested in ratings for Japanese anime, there is an extensive archive of data through the end of 2012 here. To see earlier years, just change the year in the URL. Each year's data is compiled into half-year reports called "a" and "b" in the URLs. Sadly these data seem no longer available. Some figures for older series are available here, but you'll have to dig deep to find them.

As for voice overs, my understanding is that Japanese anime productions are voiced in groups, but that these sessions generally take place after the material has been shot. This method usually costs less than "pre-lay," where the actors do their work first, and the animators must draw the lip flaps to match. A few Japanese directors have a notable preference for pre-lay, Kou Matsuo in particular. I haven't watched much of his Red Garden, but I can certainly hear the effects of this decision in Kurenai. In the third episode, there is an argument among Shinkarou, Murasaki, and Yuuno where the three actors talk over each other the way people often do. The famous "filler" episode six also uses this technique to good measure.
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eyeresist



Joined: 02 Apr 2007
Posts: 986
Location: a 320x240 resolution igloo (Sydney)
PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 9:47 pm Reply with quote
My father had an LG DVD/VCR player (actually a retirement gift) which turned out to be a POS. Also had a horrible-looking interface. I think LG stands for "Less Good".

Meanwhile my 15yo $50 DVD player is a "Diamond", presumably from Taiwan, and is extremely solid (except that in hot weather the picture can get pixelated - opening it up and making sure all the connections are tight fixes it - not a problem since I now have a/c.) Also has a great interface - screen text is large, simple and readable, without being blocky or weirdly fonted. In fact, I like it so much I'm afraid any Bluray player will be a step down.

My Teac PVR and external drive make an occasionally buggy combination and have limited functionality (literally - it can only do one thing at a time, e.g. changing channels turns subtitles off), but it was so cheap I can't really complain.

Chagen46 wrote:
Quote:
It's pretty rare to ever see another voice actor because each person is scheduled to come in separately to record their lines.
Why do English dubs do this? The Japanese can get the actors in the booth at the same time. How the hell can you expect someone to act well if they have no interaction with everyone else? I like dubs, but they seem to constantly obstruct the actors' abilities to do well.

I agree that acting in a group would result in improved performance, but (1) Japanese actors usually work with unfinalised footage, animatics and the like, whereas dub actors have to fit in with a finalised video/audio product. (2) Even if Japanese dialog doesn't get recorded until animation is basically complete, in the digital age it's much easier to do lipflap tweaking at the end of production. (3) Japanese just aren't as finicky about lipflap synchronisation as Americans.
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Nom De Plume De Fanboy
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Joined: 14 Jan 2011
Posts: 235
Location: inland US west, pretty rural
PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2014 11:28 pm Reply with quote
I just got a lesson on how not to update hardware- do not unplug after only 20 minutes during a seemingly dead update, because, according to tech support, it may take an hour. Sad

Warning. This is a tech rant, you may want to skip most or all of it.
Bought a streaming video box a week ago, a Netgear NeoTv Max. It was on close-out at Target - that's mistake number 1 - but it was cheap. Hooked it up by wire to router, it did a couple of updates ok, really slow, but it all worked. It gets crunchyroll and Hulu plus, but no Funimation or Anime Network. I'm thinking about ditching cable, so it seemed like a step in the right direction, if not a great leap.

Then, after 1 week, there's another update, 2.0point something. Maybe that 2.0 should have been a warning. But, start the update, there's a status bar, it runs ok until 3/4ths done- then the screen just goes black. I wait 10 minutes, hit reset, nothing, unplug power. ( There's no off switch. ) Wait a minute, re-plug power. Restart update over again from begining, it runs longer- then the black screen again. Wait 20 minutes this time, then try reset, then unplug/ replug. Now I get a frozen startup screen. Support in Netgear forums says try a bunch of variations of longer reset/ no power times. No good, appears completely bricked. And Target won't take returns on close-out items that are bricked.

And the next day there's a new update announced, 2.1point something. I'm getting the run around from support, and am about ready to just go get a Roku. That does get Funimation, anyway. And will be more careful about point zero updates in the future, and giving updates way more time in the future.
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enurtsol



Joined: 01 May 2007
Posts: 13706
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 5:54 am Reply with quote
Nom De Plume De Fanboy wrote:

Warning. This is a tech rant, you may want to skip most or all of it.
Bought a streaming video box a week ago, a Netgear NeoTv Max. It was on close-out at Target - that's mistake number 1 - but it was cheap. Hooked it up by wire to router, it did a couple of updates ok, really slow, but it all worked. It gets crunchyroll and Hulu plus, but no Funimation or Anime Network. I'm thinking about ditching cable, so it seemed like a step in the right direction, if not a great leap.


The latest updates seem to be bricking the Netgear Neo TVs. Thank goodness for replacement plans.
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