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INTEREST: Film Critic Responds to Netflix's Rise in Japan


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mgosdin



Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 1299
Location: Kissimmee, Florida, USA
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 1:03 pm Reply with quote
Being in the same Blu-Ray region as the US was the first inkling. Now Japan's film industry has a chance to tap into a much larger market, one that is in need of re-invigoration, with access to the funds that they need to make it happen. It will mean changes, big changes, and Japan isn't always good at change. I'm hoping to see them rise to the challenge, it will be - dare I say - entertaining.

Mark Gosdin
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L'Imperatore



Joined: 24 Mar 2014
Posts: 476
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 1:19 pm Reply with quote
Quote:
He believes "Japan's anime industry will soon change completely. And the film industry will also change."

Say, does this imply that with its shitload of money, Netflix will be finally able to, er, "bypass" the production committee system?
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TasteyCookie



Joined: 19 Jan 2017
Posts: 396
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 1:25 pm Reply with quote
Inb4 the firestorm this creates on the forums lol. But Netflix originals are a great things for Anime. Especially since the money goes to the actual animators and not the production committee.

However that being said, it's detrimental what Netflix is doing to the non-Netflix originals. By just throwing millions of dollars at the production committees to exclusively hold onto shows and encourage piracy is just bad. (ie. LWA, Violet Evergarden, Kakegurui, Fate/Apocrypha, etc.) Plus it encourages to give them to continue giving no money to animators, since Netflix will throw exorbitant amounts of money anyways.

All in all, the Netflix originals (ie. Castelvania, A.I.C.O. -Incarnation- , Lost Song, etc.) are an incredible thing for the industry, and I hope it changes things for the better. The more money going to animators, the better off the industry will be. I'm fine with waiting for Netflix originals, as they're not being broadcast week to week, now if only they switch to all Netflix originals, I'll be a happy anime watcher.
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dsfjr1190



Joined: 03 Jul 2017
Posts: 12
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 1:25 pm Reply with quote
L'Imperatore wrote:
Quote:
He believes "Japan's anime industry will soon change completely. And the film industry will also change."

Say, does this imply that with its shitload of money, Netflix will be finally able to, er, "bypass" the production committee system?


Maybe Netflix will just bypass them and sign the creatives to exclusive contracts like how they just stole Shonda Rhimes from Disney/ABC.

Or maybe they'll buy an anime production company,m similar to their purchase of Millarworld.

Whatever they end up doing, its pretty cool that they are pouring a lot of money into the industry and paying people better than their competition.
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dsfjr1190



Joined: 03 Jul 2017
Posts: 12
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 1:29 pm Reply with quote
TasteyCookie wrote:

However that being said, it's detrimental what Netflix is doing to the non-Netflix originals. By just throwing millions of dollars at the production committees to exclusively hold onto shows and encourage piracy is just bad. (ie. LWA, Violet Evergarden, Kakegurui, Fate/Apocrypha, etc.) Plus it encourages to give them to continue giving no money to animators, since Netflix will throw exorbitant amounts of money anyways.


I don't think Netflix will stay in the licensing game. I think since they want to own their content, they'll only license for now to add some shows to their library.... and then in the next couple of years they will have tons of their own original anime premiering and not need to license any more.

Slowly but surely, they'll spend more on original content and less on licensing.
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Agent355



Joined: 12 Dec 2008
Posts: 5071
Location: Crackberry in hand, thumbs at the ready...
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 1:29 pm Reply with quote
Comparing a company investing money in local media projects to an occupying army is a bit of an exaggeration. I can't even tell if he's complaining about it and warning against it or just being cautious.
"In my day, people starved for their art! Now they'll get tons of money ...at a price!"
All of this is speculation, and considering we're in a streaming media bubble right now, it's not going to last forever. I say, if Netflix offers you money to make an obscure anime project, take it!
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TasteyCookie



Joined: 19 Jan 2017
Posts: 396
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 1:30 pm Reply with quote
L'Imperatore wrote:
Quote:
He believes "Japan's anime industry will soon change completely. And the film industry will also change."

Say, does this imply that with its shitload of money, Netflix will be finally able to, er, "bypass" the production committee system?


Netflix originals bypass the production committee as Netflix IS the production committee for those shows. Or at least a majority stake holder. Which are the ones that will pay animators much more money. For the shows that they license that are not Netflix originals, ie Kakegurui, Violet Evergarden, Fate/Apocrypha, all the money goes directly to the production committees.
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Marzan



Joined: 29 Mar 2009
Posts: 477
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 1:33 pm Reply with quote
My big question is if this model is economically viable for Netflix in the long run? How many people are watching anime on their platform? Are non-anime watchers 'tuning in' or are they expecting hardcore anime public to become their customers?
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Chrono1000





PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 1:34 pm Reply with quote
We haven't seen those anime original productions and it will take a year or two before we will see how much of an affect Netflix will have on the anime industry. I have the suspicion that we will see Netflix make watered down anime. The very desire to make it as mass market as possible will lead them in that direction.
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dsfjr1190



Joined: 03 Jul 2017
Posts: 12
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 1:44 pm Reply with quote
Marzan wrote:
My big question is if this model is economically viable for Netflix in the long run? How many people are watching anime on their platform? Are non-anime watchers 'tuning in' or are they expecting hardcore anime public to become their customers?


Making anime is probably a heck of a lot cheaper than those Netflix Original live-action shows that cost upwards of 3 million dollars an episode.

And I don't think the hardcore fans matter to Netflix. They'd love to have them, but don't need them. There are plenty of non-hardcore fans that currently watch anime on their service. Not to mention the general public who have probably never heard of the word "anime" yet watch shows like Little Witch Academia, Attack on Titan, Death Note, Sword Art Online, etc.

I think hardcore fans will always underestimate how successful anime does on Netflix. They will let their personal opinions on Netflix not simulcasting dictate their belief that Netflix is failing at anime.
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Karl2



Joined: 16 Nov 2015
Posts: 59
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 1:49 pm Reply with quote
TasteyCookie wrote:
L'Imperatore wrote:
Quote:
He believes "Japan's anime industry will soon change completely. And the film industry will also change."

Say, does this imply that with its shitload of money, Netflix will be finally able to, er, "bypass" the production committee system?


Netflix originals bypass the production committee as Netflix IS the production committee for those shows. Or at least a majority stake holder. Which are the ones that will pay animators much more money. For the shows that they license that are not Netflix originals, ie Kakegurui, Violet Evergarden, Fate/Apocrypha, all the money goes directly to the production committees.


On the note of the committee members, so far this year every Netflix Original that is not Aniplex had either the studio (Mappa and Kakegurui) or the group representing them (Ultra Super Picture with both Little Witch Academia ID-0) be a part of the committee, which makes the money they earn go to the studio directly, even if the amount is dependent on how much they invested on it.
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Marzan



Joined: 29 Mar 2009
Posts: 477
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 1:53 pm Reply with quote
dsfjr1190 wrote:
Marzan wrote:
My big question is if this model is economically viable for Netflix in the long run? How many people are watching anime on their platform? Are non-anime watchers 'tuning in' or are they expecting hardcore anime public to become their customers?


Making anime is probably a heck of a lot cheaper than those Netflix Original live-action shows that cost upwards of 3 million dollars an episode.

And I don't think the hardcore fans matter to Netflix. They'd love to have them, but don't need them. There are plenty of non-hardcore fans that currently watch anime on their service. Not to mention the general public who have probably never heard of the word "anime" yet watch shows like Little Witch Academia, Attack on Titan, Death Note, Sword Art Online, etc.

I think hardcore fans will always underestimate how successful anime does on Netflix. They will let their personal opinions on Netflix not simulcasting dictate their belief that Netflix is failing at anime.


But how do we know this without actual viewership figures? For all we know Netflix is in an intense "build it and they will come" phase and not actually being rewarded for their success with lots of hits?
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Karl2



Joined: 16 Nov 2015
Posts: 59
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 1:56 pm Reply with quote
Marzan wrote:
dsfjr1190 wrote:
Marzan wrote:
My big question is if this model is economically viable for Netflix in the long run? How many people are watching anime on their platform? Are non-anime watchers 'tuning in' or are they expecting hardcore anime public to become their customers?


Making anime is probably a heck of a lot cheaper than those Netflix Original live-action shows that cost upwards of 3 million dollars an episode.

And I don't think the hardcore fans matter to Netflix. They'd love to have them, but don't need them. There are plenty of non-hardcore fans that currently watch anime on their service. Not to mention the general public who have probably never heard of the word "anime" yet watch shows like Little Witch Academia, Attack on Titan, Death Note, Sword Art Online, etc.

I think hardcore fans will always underestimate how successful anime does on Netflix. They will let their personal opinions on Netflix not simulcasting dictate their belief that Netflix is failing at anime.


But how do we know this without actual viewership figures? For all we know Netflix is in an intense "build it and they will come" phase and not actually being rewarded for their success with lots of hits?


With Cyborg 009 at least, it is doing surprisingly well, even being part of the popular section recently, which is very surprising to me.
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Sergorn



Joined: 17 Aug 2007
Posts: 80
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 2:17 pm Reply with quote
Netflix Blocked in France ? What ? Laughing

This guy doesn't know what he's talking about
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dsfjr1190



Joined: 03 Jul 2017
Posts: 12
PostPosted: Wed Aug 16, 2017 2:18 pm Reply with quote
Karl2 wrote:
Marzan wrote:
dsfjr1190 wrote:
Marzan wrote:
My big question is if this model is economically viable for Netflix in the long run? How many people are watching anime on their platform? Are non-anime watchers 'tuning in' or are they expecting hardcore anime public to become their customers?


Making anime is probably a heck of a lot cheaper than those Netflix Original live-action shows that cost upwards of 3 million dollars an episode.

And I don't think the hardcore fans matter to Netflix. They'd love to have them, but don't need them. There are plenty of non-hardcore fans that currently watch anime on their service. Not to mention the general public who have probably never heard of the word "anime" yet watch shows like Little Witch Academia, Attack on Titan, Death Note, Sword Art Online, etc.

I think hardcore fans will always underestimate how successful anime does on Netflix. They will let their personal opinions on Netflix not simulcasting dictate their belief that Netflix is failing at anime.


But how do we know this without actual viewership figures? For all we know Netflix is in an intense "build it and they will come" phase and not actually being rewarded for their success with lots of hits?


With Cyborg 009 at least, it is doing surprisingly well, even being part of the popular section recently, which is very surprising to me.


For me the anime currently in the Popular section: Durarara!!X2. Rurouni Kenshin, Aldnoah.Zero, Gantz:O, Ouran High School Host Club, Mushi-Shi, Gunslinger Girl 2, and Cased Closed, So that's maybe a 4th or a 5th of the Popular section thats anime for me.

But yeah, the fact that Netflix announced they wanted to get into anime all the way back in 2015, and announced all of that anime only a couple weeks ago proves to me that anime is doing good for them.
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