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Answerman - Why Are Sentai Titles Showing Up On Anime Strike?


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leafy sea dragon



Joined: 27 Oct 2009
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2017 7:41 pm Reply with quote
lossthief wrote:
One thing I still want to know is just what the relationship between Amazon and Sentai is with regards to shows Amazon has worldwide rights to. Re:Creators, Welcome to the Ballroom, and the Noitamina and Animeism block shows all stream worldwide - non NA viewers get them through regular Prime access.

So will Sentai eventually get the physical rights to those? If Amazon isn't in the business of producing BD/DVDs for their properties, will we just not get home video releases of them? Or will Amazon produce them on their own?


I'm going to bet that Sentai keeps the physical media rights. Amazon only wants the streaming rights as that's where their interest strictly lies, so they wouldn't care who has the physical media rights--might as well be the company that supplies them with their anime.

It is possible that further on down the line, Amazon buys Sentai outright though.

katscradle wrote:
HIDIVE is the first anime streaming service I’ve paid a subscription to since they have LoGH exclusively. They’ve got some dubs of other shows I haven’t bought yet I want to see too. I do hope HIDIVE end up with apps soon though since I prefer watching other ways than my clunky laptop.


What an interesting time we live in now that laptops are once again considered clunky...and for totally different reasons than in the 90's. (What does that make desktops?)

CANimeFan88 wrote:
Quote:
Amazon doesn't want or need the latter, since they're not in the DVD/BD publishing business


What does that even mean? I purchase DVDs and Blu-rays on Amazon all the time.


It means that Amazon sells DVDs and Blu-Rays but doesn't make them. The between-the-lines meaning is that Amazon neither gains nor loses from physical rights, and since they don't make physical home video, it's in Amazon's best interest to let them go to a company that does so they can have something to sell.

Think of it like a supermarket. They don't actually make their own groceries, for the most part (and the supermarket-brand products are actually made by an outside company, usually one of the big ones under the supermarket's brand). They mostly sell groceries. But they want other companies to make groceries so the supermarket can sell them.
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leelee85



Joined: 29 Jun 2017
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2017 8:40 pm Reply with quote
leafy sea dragon wrote:
lossthief wrote:
One thing I still want to know is just what the relationship between Amazon and Sentai is with regards to shows Amazon has worldwide rights to. Re:Creators, Welcome to the Ballroom, and the Noitamina and Animeism block shows all stream worldwide - non NA viewers get them through regular Prime access.

So will Sentai eventually get the physical rights to those? If Amazon isn't in the business of producing BD/DVDs for their properties, will we just not get home video releases of them? Or will Amazon produce them on their own?


I'm going to bet that Sentai keeps the physical media rights. Amazon only wants the streaming rights as that's where their interest strictly lies, so they wouldn't care who has the physical media rights--might as well be the company that supplies them with their anime.

It is possible that further on down the line, Amazon buys Sentai outright though.


Next thing you know Amazon may force Sentai to dub everything.
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configspace



Joined: 16 Aug 2008
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2017 9:33 pm Reply with quote
leafy sea dragon wrote:
lossthief wrote:
One thing I still want to know is just what the relationship between Amazon and Sentai is with regards to shows Amazon has worldwide rights to. Re:Creators, Welcome to the Ballroom, and the Noitamina and Animeism block shows all stream worldwide - non NA viewers get them through regular Prime access.

So will Sentai eventually get the physical rights to those? If Amazon isn't in the business of producing BD/DVDs for their properties, will we just not get home video releases of them? Or will Amazon produce them on their own?


I'm going to bet that Sentai keeps the physical media rights. Amazon only wants the streaming rights as that's where their interest strictly lies, so they wouldn't care who has the physical media rights--might as well be the company that supplies them with their anime.

It is possible that further on down the line, Amazon buys Sentai outright though.


Just another example that Amazon really, really doesn't care for physical or non-streaming rights, is Kabaneri of the Iron Fortress. In this case, Crunchyroll got the movie version rights and the home video rights (in partnership with Funimation) and the merchandising rights, despite Amazon having the streaming rights for the TV broadcast. So it is possible we might even see the movie version streaming on CR.
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EnigmaticSky



Joined: 06 Aug 2011
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 04, 2017 11:38 pm Reply with quote
I honestly just hate how many streaming services are cropping up. I refuse to pay for every company to have their own streaming service just to keep up with maybe one or two shows I really want to watch; I stopped buying cable for a reason. And when Prime offers me pretty much nothing I want (I couldn't care less about getting something a few days later), Anime Strike is just never going to happen for me.
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leafy sea dragon



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 12:24 am Reply with quote
EnigmaticSky wrote:
I honestly just hate how many streaming services are cropping up. I refuse to pay for every company to have their own streaming service just to keep up with maybe one or two shows I really want to watch; I stopped buying cable for a reason. And when Prime offers me pretty much nothing I want (I couldn't care less about getting something a few days later), Anime Strike is just never going to happen for me.


Personally, I use Amazon Prime for the free shipping than for the speedier delivery. For some reason, shipping to where I live is really, really expensive. Any options better than the cheapest possible option, about half the time, will cost more than the items themselves. The monthly fee for Prime pays for itself after one item shipped to my house. (I don't live way out in the sticks or somewhere dangerous either. It's the suburbs in a major metropolitan area. I have never figured out why shipping to here costs two or three times more than even adjacent neighborhoods.)

I don't really buy online that much though, as my stuff often arrives damaged, and typically at the very end of the estimated delivery window or later. (I avoid buying anything made of or containing paper or electronic items when there's rain forecasted, for instance, and I never buy anything containing chocolate when it's warm out.)
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Zalis116
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 12:56 am Reply with quote
leafy sea dragon wrote:
What an interesting time we live in now that laptops are once again considered clunky...and for totally different reasons than in the 90's. (What does that make desktops?)
Something that only hardcore gamers and nerds have, or possibly a specialty tool for people working in some field like video editing that requires more processing power than a laptop or tablet.

mangamuscle wrote:
angelmcazares wrote:
BodaciousSpacePirate wrote:
We all know that a good chunk of disc sales in the US are generated by people illegally streaming shows and buying Blurays of the ones they like.

I seriously doubt this is true. People who pirate anime don't care about giving money to the creators and owners. How in the world will they have the decency to pay for legal discs.


It has already been shown that pirates buy a lot of media. OK, the study talks about music and not video (or anime) in particular, but I do not see why it would be different, if you pirate is because you are interested and if you really like what you saw chances are higher than you will buy it than if you went into a store and said "hey, that bluray cover looks nice".
It's different because of the bordering-on-cultural-sickness anti-industry ideology that many anime fans viewers have. You see, the latest toxic talking point to come out of the delusional fever swamps is something along the lines of, "I care about animators and creators, and that's why I pirate, because if I actually spend money on anime, too much goes to corporate fat cats and middlemen instead of reaching the creators." Of course, they're never able to square the circle and explain why it's somehow better to patronize bootleg streaming sites that profit from anime production and pay animators/creators absolutely nothing in the process.

EnigmaticSky wrote:
I honestly just hate how many streaming services are cropping up. I refuse to pay for every company to have their own streaming service just to keep up with maybe one or two shows I really want to watch; I stopped buying cable for a reason.
Is a monopoly streaming service really going to be any cheaper or better for consumers?
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EricJ2



Joined: 01 Feb 2014
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 1:22 am Reply with quote
Zalis116 wrote:
EnigmaticSky wrote:
I honestly just hate how many streaming services are cropping up. I refuse to pay for every company to have their own streaming service just to keep up with maybe one or two shows I really want to watch; I stopped buying cable for a reason.
Is a monopoly streaming service really going to be any cheaper or better for consumers?


No, but the opposite's even worse:
A gold-rush Boom officially becomes a Bubble when all those getting into it get so Netflix-happy, they start explaining why you just shouldn't do anything else with your content, and then something happens to pull the bottom out from under it, while slow growth or customer disinterest (in having more than two or three services if they don't have to) keeps it from gaining any forward momentum.
And then the industry finds itself without a Plan B.

At the moment, EVERY cable channel and EVERY content owner wants to be its own streaming service unto itself--so that they can hold onto their content and continue to hold their audience while facing the death of broadcast cable--and not all of them can be. A quick look at the other splinter channels on Amazon will prove that, as you get past the first half of key exclusive titles, and then watch them all fall back into the same communal pool of public-domain and micro-indies.
The new key to the coming future is in who can gather a lot of wandering stragglers under one or two major roofs, and Amazon is far from being the best one, but they're the earliest at knowing how to do it.
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Kadmos1
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 1:58 am Reply with quote
If Anime Strike lacked a double paywall and had worldwide availability (excluding China, Japan, and nations that actively block Amazon), then Amazon might have more appreciation from its users.
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aereus



Joined: 08 Jun 2010
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 4:57 am Reply with quote
Zalis116 wrote:
It's different because of the bordering-on-cultural-sickness anti-industry ideology that many anime fans viewers have. You see, the latest toxic talking point to come out of the delusional fever swamps is something along the lines of, "I care about animators and creators, and that's why I pirate, because if I actually spend money on anime, too much goes to corporate fat cats and middlemen instead of reaching the creators."


I don't really buy much anime anymore, but at the same time neither does Japan. Physical discs are a collectors item. (Although if a series is anime original, that is a different case for me) What I do buy however, is other merch for a series and the original manga in the case of adaptations. Look no further than the types of vendors now in the dealers rooms of conventions as compared to ten years ago: You'll find maybe 1-2 vendors with any physical media for sale at all, but a dozen or more vendors all selling figures, plushies, bags, keychains, wallscrolls, etc.

People don't like buying music anymore, they subscribe to streaming services like Pandora and Spotify. The same is true for anime. And I would much rather people support ones like Daisuki, Hidive, or even Anime Strike than Crunchyroll. CR is backed by AT&T/Comcast and its roots are found in profiteering off piracy/fansubs—duping volunteers into building up the site only for them to cut everyone loose and the two of them to personally get rich off the scheme.
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mgosdin



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 6:51 am Reply with quote
Just a sec. Let me see, it was over here .. right? Wow, dust. Need the compressed air can. <PPPSSSSHHH> OK, that's got it.

Streaming <> Physical Media.

As the Audio fans ( Like Me ) have found, it is entirely possible for a Streaming operation to fail, or be bought out, and to fold up and disappear. Leaving you high & dry. There have been a few Anime streamers ( Daisuke for one ) that have scaled back or completely vanished. Not to mention that licenses only last so long and titles regularly disappear. So, if it is a show that you really like and want to keep around you need that affordable physical release.

It seems to me that that wall scroll / figure / etc. won't be much comfort if you can't watch the show that caused you to buy them in the first place.

Mark Gosdin
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Gewürtztraminer
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 9:40 am Reply with quote
What is odd, it was Amazon picking up Kabaneri that tipped me to becoming a Prime member.
I have since enjoyed all the Prime benefits, and with living in the same city as a distribution center, the amount of stuff I can get same day for free is astounding.
I made it to about episode 7 or 8 of Kabaneri the player on the Roku and PS3 was not easy to use, after several visits to the interwebs, I finally discovered how to turn on subtitles, and was turned off by the way they looked different from virtually everything else.
The commands for this were different on the Roku and PS3 at the time. I decided it was not worth the pain and I would wait for the physical release.
The next season, I checked out 2 episodes of Battery. Had to relearn the subtitle activation sequence. The show was not for me.
Then word got out about The Great Passage, and I was finally pumped about an Amazon show. I waited and waited, it completed, then Anime Strike was announced.
I was not amused.
Since then, shows on Strike have ceased to exist for me, I ignore them and all coverage of them. I do keep a list of shows that I might have interest in for the future.
At the same time, I am following less shows on Crunchyroll, I was following 20-24 shows a season, now 6-8.
I have found that I am over having to follow the discussion about a show week to week.
Once Amazon builds up a decent library, I will treat them as if a rental shop.
I will get my free trial, binge everything, then when they have enough content to warrant it, subscribe for a month and binge again then cancel.
Right now, they do not have enough to warrant the cost in comparison, unless a good portion of your enjoyment comes from following the discussion week to week.
But as I mentioned, I am over that.
And I think I must thank Amazon, 20-24 shows a season was not sustainable for me, and I was watching a lot of stuff I did not really enjoy, just to stay current.
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Greed1914
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 12:26 pm Reply with quote
TasteyCookie wrote:


Oh no I totally agree! It is a great thing Very Happy As long as they keep it up where the shows they license seem to be of random hype levels and they only grab 10 or less a season, CR should be fine. Though I honestly have no idea where Sentai fits into the big scheme of things. I love Sentai as a licencor (though I hate their deal with AS) because they have generally pretty good releases and release lesser known shows. But I don't think anyone is guessing that Amazon will stick with them for the long haul. Unless HiDive takes off then I have no idea where that leaves them, and it's a little sad.


That is something I've been thinking. Amazon licensing two blocks does suggest that it is interested in eventually licensing things itself without relying on Sentai, even if it is done by paying a lot of money up front and rolling the dice, which is something that also tends to lend to the idea that Amazon doesn't seem to have much of a strategy beyond using its money. Sentai building up Hidive while also putting new stuff on Amazon seems like them hedging their bets that eventually Amazon will decide it doesn't need Sentai's help.
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mangamuscle



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 5:52 pm Reply with quote
angelmcazares wrote:
The way you characterize Amazon in regard to anime streaming sounds like chaos. I agree with that to a certain extent that they don't know what they are doing. But isn't this chaos a great thing for those who want Amazon to get out of anime?


Not really. This season AS laid low, but what happens if next season they get the 10 most popular shows? (that would be chaos) Funiroll wil be badly hit, that is a given; AS can have a bad season because they are part of a bigger company which streams media beyond anime. Then if they manage to remove the worthy competitors (aka funiroll) they might even refrain from licensing anime for a season to see if they can make streaming license prices go down, if they destroy a whole industry they would not even notice nor care.

Zalis116 wrote:
It's different because of the bordering-on-cultural-sickness anti-industry ideology that many anime fans viewers have. You see, the latest toxic talking point to come out of the delusional fever swamps is something along the lines of, "I care about animators and creators, and that's why I pirate, because if I actually spend money on anime, too much goes to corporate fat cats and middlemen instead of reaching the creators." Of course, they're never able to square the circle and explain why it's somehow better to patronize bootleg streaming sites that profit from anime production and pay animators/creators absolutely nothing in the process.


Calling that an ideology is a gross exaggeration. It looks more like what a teen cornered in a messageboard discussion would say, because at least in the USA the winning narrative is all about "I am part of the good guys". If said teen get a part time job or still likes anime by the time of entering the workforce, chances are the "ideology" will shift to consumerism.
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angelmcazares
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 05, 2017 10:15 pm Reply with quote
mangamuscle wrote:
Then if they manage to remove the worthy competitors (aka funiroll) they might even refrain from licensing anime for a season to see if they can make streaming license prices go down, if they destroy a whole industry they would not even notice nor care.

And if evil Amazon attempted to do that, the Japanese would just take it and stop licencing anime overseas, losing tons of money in the process? I assume you believe that Japanese people are stupid and would allow to be blackmailed by the smarter, ruthless American company.

If Amazon was able to prevent licencing for a season, it is most likely that the Japanese anime companies would tell Amazon to f.uck off, and they would find new partners. For Amazon to destroy the anime industry they would need to buy all anime companies, not blackmail them.
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Kadmos1
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 08, 2017 9:19 am Reply with quote
I think Amazon Prime had its simulcast right when "Kabaneri" was streaming. If Sentai Filmworks was nearly as big as Funi, then they might not have to use Anime Strike.
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