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NEWS: Anime Industry Takes in Record 2.0 Trillion Yen in 2016


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fantaselion



Joined: 22 Dec 2016
Posts: 281
PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 12:26 am Reply with quote
So is anime dying or not?
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HoboSoup



Joined: 06 Aug 2017
Posts: 261
PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 12:56 am Reply with quote
fantaselion wrote:
So is anime dying or not?


"Anime Industry Takes in Record 2.0 Trillion Yen in 2016". I'm guessing your comment is joking around right? The article also talks about how profits are rising every year. Generally speaking anime popularity in countries outside of Japan has been on the rise for at least a few years now, which has been bringing in more profits as well.

Overall anime seems to be doing very well, there's a bit of a minor bump with DVD and Blu-Ray not selling super great these days as digital is on the rise. But I've heard there are a lot of profits gained else where so it's fine in general.
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Romuska
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 1:01 am Reply with quote
So how much of these record-breaking grossings are going to the animators?
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Morry



Joined: 26 Jun 2016
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 1:10 am Reply with quote
We can thank China for the continuous growth. It'd be bad if anime was in decline even after the push into such a huge market.
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#861208



Joined: 07 Oct 2016
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 1:17 am Reply with quote
Live events are so massive. If someone doesn't start streaming them to English sites, that's a problem. It's a huge disconnect between Japanese fandom and English. (a lot of them, especially stage plays, already stream/simulcast in Asia outside of Japan, and a few stage plays (like Tsukiuta) even tour to other countries.
So if they can subtitle it for them, they can do English, too, and if they watch raw, so can we.

At least give us the Touken Ranbu stage plays, since those are always the #1 overall DVD/BD in Japan.

Also, on-site merchandise is also a big thing, since basically, everyone gets to those events on the first train in order to line up for merchandise. I don't just mean Comiket, I mean every stage play, concert, those events that you always hear them announce sequels at... merchandise sales at those are super big.

This stuff is serious business in Japan, and Western fandom has no idea...
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Kadmos1



Joined: 08 May 2014
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 2:00 am Reply with quote
fantaselion wrote:
So is anime dying or not?

Maybe the output compared to previous years is "dying" and some companies are folding (piracy can only account for a certain amount as bad business decisions are also a factor),
but not the industry overall.
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Agent355



Joined: 12 Dec 2008
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 3:37 am Reply with quote
Yay! Now all the animators can get raises and won't need to live in crowdfunded dorms anymore!
...That, or some production committees get a profit...
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Jonny Mendes



Joined: 17 Oct 2014
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 5:14 am Reply with quote
Quote:
The report cautions that it is possible that this is a bubble; it mentions geopolitical tensions in the East Asian region and the potential online enforcement of a 2006 Chinese law (that prohibits foreign animation from airing during primetime) as possible reasons for future decline.


This is the reason why i think this growth is a bubble and the reason why the Japanese domestic market is and will be the most important for anime, and also the reason they avoid given Chinese influence in Production Committees (except when is Chinese/Japanese co-productions for the Chinese market).

Sometime in the near future, China will have their on Chinese animation industry in full throttle and foreign animation (Japanese anime) will have no place in China. Also the dominance on Chinese animation will extend to other countries even if is a copy of anime style (it will be allot cheaper to license than Japanese anime, im sure)

Japanese anime companies have to take a greater look at digital streaming and multi-language subs if they want to keep a strong industry. A multi-platform site will have more possibility to get to more people than the traditional TV time-slots.
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omiya



Joined: 21 Sep 2011
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Location: Adelaide, South Australia
PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 5:34 am Reply with quote
#861208 wrote:
Live events are so massive. If someone doesn't start streaming them to English sites, that's a problem.


As in Love Live! [Sunshine] live events? I have yet to attend anything in Tokyo Dome, but have attended several Animelo Summer Live concerts in Saitama Super Arena and a few Animax Musix concerts in Yokohama Arena, and solo concerts by Nana Mizuki, Minori Chihara, and others.

I've also been to a couple of lives where the artist performed one of their anime songs at my request and there were about 30 in the audience each time. I don't think those events would be captured in the statistics, maybe not even the talks given by Yuuho Iwasato despite how many anime songs' lyrics she wrote.
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MarshalBanana



Joined: 31 Aug 2014
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 5:42 am Reply with quote
Agent355 wrote:
Yay! Now all the animators can get raises and won't need to live in crowdfunded dorms anymore!
...That, or some production committees get a profit...
The problem is that Anime takes a lot of people to make, so even a big budget is spread thin.
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Stuart Smith



Joined: 13 Jan 2013
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 6:19 am Reply with quote
#861208 wrote:

This stuff is serious business in Japan, and Western fandom has no idea...


There's so much disconnect with merchandise, events, stores, museums, collaborations, fanart, doujinshi, and trends that Westerners will never hear about or know exists unless they actively take part in the Japanese fandom. Honestly, the western fandoms are pretty neglegible when it comes to Japanese media. If one only sticks to English communities, they really do miss virtually everything. Whenever I'm in Japan I make it a priority to visit live-events or concerts. When I'm not, I try to find a camrip of it, but not everything can be archived and recorded.

-Stuart Smith
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Jonny Mendes



Joined: 17 Oct 2014
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 6:42 am Reply with quote
Stuart Smith wrote:
#861208 wrote:

This stuff is serious business in Japan, and Western fandom has no idea...


There's so much disconnect with merchandise, events, stores, museums, collaborations, fanart, doujinshi, and trends that Westerners will never hear about or know exists unless they actively take part in the Japanese fandom. Honestly, the western fandoms are pretty neglegible when it comes to Japanese media. If one only sticks to English communities, they really do miss virtually everything. Whenever I'm in Japan I make it a priority to visit live-events or concerts. When I'm not, I try to find a camrip of it, but not everything can be archived and recorded.

-Stuart Smith

I agree 100%
I also go to Japan and Japanese sites and I can tell that what western fandoms are looking at is only a small part of the anime world.
To understand why some shows are so successful and others are not, is better to open your world more to the Japanese fandom.
And don't know Japanese is no longer a issue. Internet translators are getting better and now Japanese sites are more readable than before.
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Ushio



Joined: 31 Jul 2005
Posts: 462
PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 7:54 am Reply with quote
HoboSoup wrote:
fantaselion wrote:
So is anime dying or not?


"Anime Industry Takes in Record 2.0 Trillion Yen in 2016". I'm guessing your comment is joking around right? The article also talks about how profits are rising every year. Generally speaking anime popularity in countries outside of Japan has been on the rise for at least a few years now, which has been bringing in more profits as well.

Overall anime seems to be doing very well, there's a bit of a minor bump with DVD and Blu-Ray not selling super great these days as digital is on the rise. But I've heard there are a lot of profits gained else where so it's fine in general.



Except that this report isn't about how profitable anime is but about I.P that has an anime. Anime studios are suffering because they rarely make anything from the side industries.
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crosswithyou



Joined: 15 Dec 2007
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 8:00 am Reply with quote
Re: Events
I think only a very small percentage of Western anime fandom would actually be interested in attending Japanese events. People complain when convention prices are $80 for 3 or 4 days. Those people are not likely going to fork over $60-100 for a 3-5 hour event.

Asian fans, particularly those in China and Korea, are very much into Japanese voice acting, and to an extent, the language barrier is not as overwhelming compared to English-speaking countries. Companies can probably gain a fairly reasonable profit marketing events to East Asian countries. I'm not sure the same can be said of the U.S. and other non-Asian countries. The distance between the countries is definitely a factor since closer countries are more easily influenced. I've heard that a lot of mobile games in China have a Japanese voice cast (even though the game is Chinese-made) as a necessity because people won't play the game otherwise. Meanwhile in the U.S., for example, English dub actors can often draw a larger crowd than a Japanese seiyuu at conventions.
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Stuart Smith



Joined: 13 Jan 2013
Posts: 1298
PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2017 8:48 am Reply with quote
crosswithyou wrote:
Re: Events
I think only a very small percentage of Western anime fandom would actually be interested in attending Japanese events. People complain when convention prices are $80 for 3 or 4 days. Those people are not likely going to fork over $60-100 for a 3-5 hour event.

Asian fans, particularly those in China and Korea, are very much into Japanese voice acting, and to an extent, the language barrier is not as overwhelming compared to English-speaking countries. Companies can probably gain a fairly reasonable profit marketing events to East Asian countries. I'm not sure the same can be said of the U.S. and other non-Asian countries. The distance between the countries is definitely a factor since closer countries are more easily influenced. I've heard that a lot of mobile games in China have a Japanese voice cast (even though the game is Chinese-made) as a necessity because people won't play the game otherwise. Meanwhile in the U.S., for example, English dub actors can often draw a larger crowd than a Japanese seiyuu at conventions.


To be fair, seiyuu culture is virtually meaningless to fans that mainly watch dubs. Hearing a seiyuu release a character song or meeting them won't mean much to them if they only know the character by their English voice. American fans are also very frugal. It's the same reaction you see people have over Japanese BD prices, or having to pay an extra 10 bucks for an additional streaming service. For lack of a better term, Japanese otaku are more hardcore. Dropping 6000 yen for a concert, or a Blu-Ray, or a figure is just part of the hobby.

One of my personal favorite events I went to was an concert for Super Sentai. Hearing the singers of all the OP and ED themes, plus seeing the actors doing routines was great, all in a crowd of thousands of fans of all ages. However, I make no dellusions that a similar thing for Power Rangers would ever be even remotely profitable or marketable here. It really is a cultural difference in the fandoms. I assume the lack of English covers for character songs also indicate there's no real market for dub voice actors to do that stuff either.

-Stuart Smith
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