Forum - View topic
Manga Answerman - Does Manga Need An Anime Adaptation To Hit In The West?




Note: this is the discussion thread for this article

Anime News Network Forum Index -> Site-related -> Talkback
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Яeverse



Joined: 16 Jun 2014
Posts: 780
Location: Indianapolis
PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2019 1:28 pm Reply with quote
Feel like the mangaplus and viz jump start (you know the platforms starting and continuing manga as soon as they start in jpn), give lots of evidence to support that anime can make some series big.

Jujutsu is kind of still unknown, but looks prime to take off when it gets an anime.

Promised neverland was already big before the anime, same for HeroAca as if I recall it was a top seller on the manga sales chart preanime in america anyway.

Light novels seem to need anime more, like Shield Hero wasnt really that known beyond just he usual LN crowd, same for SAO and others until anime.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
BodaciousSpacePirate
It's Over 9000!It's Over 9000!


Joined: 17 Apr 2015
Posts: 2636
PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2019 1:47 pm Reply with quote
Яeverse wrote:
Light novels seem to need anime more, like Shield Hero wasnt really that known beyond just he usual LN crowd, same for SAO and others until anime.


Yeah, although I feel that part of that may be that even though western audiences generally know what "manga" is (it had its own huge section at Borders, afterall), a significant number of people (even people who casually watch anime) still don't really know what a "light novel" is. Light novels also don't have as large an online translation/scanlation scene, which tends to be how a lot of people "stumble on" popular titles these days.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message My Anime My Manga
zenbud



Joined: 02 Jan 2019
Posts: 67
PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2019 2:39 pm Reply with quote
Unfortunately, it's true. It's one of the reasons I wished to live in Japan as I'm more of a manga and light novel reader even if I watch anime.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Morry



Joined: 26 Jun 2016
Posts: 561
PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:11 pm Reply with quote
From a western perspective, I agree that light novels need anime more to get exposure. Audiences are more willing to read through a crappy to okay fan translation of a manga than a light novel of the same quality. The manga art carries a good 70% of the product, light novels rely almost entirely on their prose. This leads to generally more people being fans of the manga prior to the anime airing than the light novel.

This is ignoring the fact that people are less inclined to read books over comics and comics over animated media. That trend alone can explain the behavior.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Sakagami Tomoyo



Joined: 06 Dec 2008
Posts: 785
Location: Melbourne, VIC, Australia
PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2019 6:21 pm Reply with quote
It isn't a necessity for an anime adaptation to exist for a manga to be a hit in the West; as noted, there are plenty of manga that do pretty well without. On the other hand, I'd say those are outnumbered by the titles that leap from middling to good sales once the anime starts airing. And series that were already big get massive when the anime comes out.

As an aside, it seems to me like there are a fair few instances where the manga starting English publication happens more-or-less just after an anime adaptation has been announced, so I think at least a few people in the US manga publishing companies think there's something to this idea.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
kotomikun



Joined: 06 May 2013
Posts: 632
PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2019 10:01 pm Reply with quote
Obviously it's not universally true, but that wasn't the question. Most of the time, yes, at least in the US, a Japanese series doesn't get much traction until an anime comes out. Often the manga or light novel doesn't even get translated until an anime is announced, or just doesn't get any advertising to speak of, so only the small minority of fans who either can read Japanese or go to the trouble to hunt down scanlations will even have the opportunity to read it.

There are exceptions... but, are there, really? I've never heard of 2 of the 3 examples given in the article. And if you look at ones that do have adaptations, you probably won't find any that didn't at least double in popularity after the anime came out. The internet is riddled with anime videos (both legal and illegal) and some are even on TV or Netflix, but you're not likely to just stumble into a manga. In Japan, where apparently 25% (more than I would have guessed!) of printed media is manga, and streaming/blu-rays are less popular, it's much more plausible that someone would discover something that way.

The cynical explanation is that Americans hate reading, but I think it's really just that they're focused on other things. They wouldn't be cranking out all those superhero movies if the comics weren't popular. ...Well, the movies might have their own inertia by now, but Barnes&Noble still has a huge shelf of "graphic novels" that's 95% DC/Marvel. With so much local entertainment, and a ton of anime on top of that, manga is a niche within a niche that most people don't have much interest in on its own.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
lys



Joined: 24 Jun 2004
Posts: 929
Location: mitten-state
PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2019 10:22 pm Reply with quote
kotomikun wrote:
The cynical explanation is that Americans hate reading, but I think it's really just that they're focused on other things. They wouldn't be cranking out all those superhero movies if the comics weren't popular. ...Well, the movies might have their own inertia by now, but Barnes&Noble still has a huge shelf of "graphic novels" that's 95% DC/Marvel. With so much local entertainment, and a ton of anime on top of that, manga is a niche within a niche that most people don't have much interest in on its own.

But people love anime! All the time online I see people wishing for additional seasons of some series, so they can "know how it ends" or some such reason, and these are very often for series that have an official English manga release either running or complete. As a manga person myself, I really wish more people took a wider interest in that format and didn't act like anime was all there is. There's so much great manga, and lots of it will never have an anime... and that's okay. But you're missing out if you ignore the medium!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Nonaka Machine Gun B



Joined: 03 Feb 2009
Posts: 717
PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2019 7:50 am Reply with quote
It's always kind of annoyed me how transparent some companies are about this. I understand it's a business, but Viz would have never, ever, ever, EVER touched JoJo's Bizarre Adventure had there not been an anime to do all the marketing for them. Now it's the biggest thing ever, and they've (almost)taken full advantage.

I can't wait until Saint Seiya gets a real, well-received remake, and they jump on that again.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Lord Geo



Joined: 18 Sep 2005
Posts: 1669
Location: North Brunswick, New Jersey
PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2019 8:31 am Reply with quote
Nonaka Machine Gun B wrote:
Viz would have never, ever, ever, EVER touched JoJo's Bizarre Adventure had there not been an anime to do all the marketing for them.


Viz released all of the Stardust Crusaders part of the manga years before the anime ever debuted, and it notably bombed hard (especially after it was put on hiatus for a year, following that whole stupid "Quran & mosques" controversy). If anything, JoJo is proof positive that having an anime adaptation can notably boost sales & reception for a manga.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Kicksville



Joined: 20 Nov 2010
Posts: 718
PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2019 10:14 pm Reply with quote
Lord Geo wrote:
Nonaka Machine Gun B wrote:
Viz would have never, ever, ever, EVER touched JoJo's Bizarre Adventure had there not been an anime to do all the marketing for them.


Viz released all of the Stardust Crusaders part of the manga years before the anime ever debuted, and it notably bombed hard (especially after it was put on hiatus for a year, following that whole stupid "Quran & mosques" controversy). If anything, JoJo is proof positive that having an anime adaptation can notably boost sales & reception for a manga.

Interestingly, they nearly did it before on two other previous occasions as well, as noted in Jason Thompson's old House of 1000 Manga column here:
Quote:
Viz planned to bring Jojo to America in the early 1990s - they ran a little blurb about it in their promo newsletter Viz-In under the name "The Strange Adventures of Jojo" - but the plan collapsed when BAOH flopped. Again in 2002, there was talk about doing Jojo as a monthly comic series, but that stalled too because the monthly manga "floppies" market was obviously collapsing, and it wasn't until 2005 that the series came out in graphic novel form.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
El Hermano



Joined: 24 Feb 2019
Posts: 89
PostPosted: Sat Apr 20, 2019 10:35 pm Reply with quote
Quote:
By comparison, pop culture consumption in North America seems to be more focused on video/TV/movie consumption – watching something versus reading something. This is even more so now that anime is available via various streaming and broadcast channels than ever before.


That explains why movies and shows like Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter and Game of Thrones have completely eclipsed the books to the point the live-action versions are the definitive versions in pop culture, and if you prefer the books then you're a bit out of luck there since all the merchandise and new media will focus on the TV and movie versions. Then of course there's comic book movies doing super well while the comic industry itself is on life support.

I remember when I was in high school they us to have a mandatory reading period and forced us to add reading to our everyday lives. Not sure if it was just my school district or it was a country-wide thing, but they really wanted to counter that notion that Americans don't read. I guess I'm a bit guilty of this myself since I prefer anime to manga, and only read the manga if it really catches my eye or the anime ends before the manga finishes and I want to read the rest of the series
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Kadmos1



Joined: 08 May 2014
Posts: 12321
Location: In Phoenix but has an 85308 ZIP
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2019 2:00 am Reply with quote
I am curious about the following: say a manga series and its anime version both flopped in sales in Japan. However, at least the manga sold decent to really well in the U.S. Anyone know of such a situation? I will even take a series that is rumored to have done better in the U.S.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Alan45
Village ElderVillage Elder


Joined: 25 Aug 2010
Posts: 8506
Location: Virginia
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2019 6:24 am Reply with quote
@Kadmos1

If a manga flops in Japan it is cancelled by the magazine as soon as that becomes apparent by reader response cards, likely before it would be republished in book form. There would be no anime version and in most cases no English language version.

The closest to your question would be a series that was popular for a long period and then fails the ending.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message My Anime My Manga
Thaumana



Joined: 08 Jul 2017
Posts: 46
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2019 6:14 pm Reply with quote
It strikes me recently on ANN that shortly after an aired pilot episode of an anime adaptation the release is often followed by the the announcement of the upcoming final arc or end of a manga or light novel. Which makes me wonder why the publishers and the creator would decide to end the project already that soon since the airing anime can still achieve a good reception over the time.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Re:SOUL



Joined: 02 Mar 2016
Posts: 124
PostPosted: Mon Apr 22, 2019 6:37 pm Reply with quote
I think it's obvious that the west is more focused on anime than manga. Most of the time I see people talking about a Japanese IP it's the anime and they only read the manga to stay ahead or up to date with the story. These same people usually only read scanlations as well rather than buying the books.

Many fans these days seem to care more about what's current and popular rather than having an interest in anime and manga as a whole. If an anime interests me I at least read it's Wikipedia entry and if the anime is good I'll track down the manga to see what's the same or different. I find it strange that people can cosplay as a character but not even know the origins of the show in question.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic    Anime News Network Forum Index -> Site-related -> Talkback All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group