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INTEREST: Jump Editor-in-Chief Explains What's Unusual About Demon Slayer's Success


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ThatMoonGuy



Joined: 13 Oct 2017
Posts: 141
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2020 4:55 am Reply with quote
It doesn't help that TPN moved far away from its initial premise to the point that the mangá is barely recognizable. It begun as a escape thriller and then went on a completely different direction. Honestly, as it is now I find TPN to be an OK manga at most. People were selling the manga a lot on the first arc but everything else is downhill from there.
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capt_bunny



Joined: 31 May 2015
Posts: 196
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2020 7:54 am Reply with quote
Cardcaptor Takato wrote:
It's kind of funny to me how Demon Slayer has come out of nowhere after everyone was hyping up Promised Neverland as the next big shonen hit but now it feels like most people have already moved on from it. Like I'm sure it has manga readers but I rarely see people talking about it on social media like I do Demon Slayer.


I was thinking that too. It's not talked about but many fans are still there. A lot of people were saying how Promised Neverland was going to be huge too. Heck, I was checking it out when the first 3 chapters were out. Many were praising it.
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Tripple-A



Joined: 21 Feb 2017
Posts: 182
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2020 8:03 am Reply with quote
It doesn't seem like they get why Kimetsu no Yaiba is so successful.
The main reason is just timing. There aren't that many big titles at the moment and Boku no Hero Academia was already running for a long time. The anime was also nearing its climax before Dr. Stone really started and Dr. Stone itself isn't really classic shounen. Paired with overall good animations, especially in the fights, it wasn't a surprise to see the anime having such a success, which in turn propelled the mana sales even ahead of One Piece.
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enurtsol



Joined: 01 May 2007
Posts: 13771
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2020 8:27 am Reply with quote
Murder, She wrote:

"Normally, a manga gradually sells more copies throughout the anime's run, but Demon Slayer: Kimetsu no Yaiba's sales shot up straight after the anime ended," he said, indicating that a large number of people watched the anime through streaming services after it ended rather than watching it weekly. "The way people interact with anime has changed, and I feel like we've entered a new phase."


Thank goodness for streaming - no need for late nights
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dragon695



Joined: 28 Nov 2008
Posts: 1229
Location: Clemson, SC
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2020 9:42 am Reply with quote
I’m too lazy to quote, but this guy contradicts himself on a number of points. In particular, he seems to not get that Demon Slayer was a slow burn rise to success not because of but rather despite the culture of grabbing at straws for the next hit. The irony is he lauds it for garnering word of mouth reputation, which takes time to develop. If it had come out in the late 2000s, would it have been able to stick around long enough to get off the ground?
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Maidenoftheredhand



Joined: 21 Jun 2007
Posts: 2452
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2020 8:04 pm Reply with quote
I just hope we go back to have multiple series on the best seller list soon. One series dominating is pretty boring.
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Bueller



Joined: 24 Mar 2015
Posts: 9
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2020 8:05 pm Reply with quote
JonDoe wrote:
Bueller wrote:
Quote:
"The way people interact with anime has changed, and I feel like we've entered a new phase."


Nah, Demon Slayer's success has to do with production and advertising. If it had been a more traditional adaptation, it probably wouldn't have become so famous (the manga, by itself, never was). On the other hand, if Black Clover or Dr Stone had the same treatment they would have become big hits too.


I disagree with that last sentence about Black Clover. That anime failed to take off because it's source material just isn't very good. I mean the beginning of Black Clover is so shamelessly derivative of other works that any adaptation would've had a hard time trying to get something worth while out of it.


With a little sakuga, good soundtrack and camera angles, anything is possible, friend. And Demon Slayer is also far from being innovative. It's actually quite formulaic and one-dimensional.

AutoOps007 wrote:
Kisuke525 wrote:
ThatMoonGuy wrote:
Replica_Rabbit wrote:
Wish, World Trigger was this successful. Anyway, glad Demon Slayer is successful. Probably should get around and read/watch it.
It is odd, that demon slayer is the only Jump manga I avoided. I don't know why I would read Black Clover over it (and I not a fan of Black Clover)


Ditto. WT was my favourite jump manga when it was running there and though I deeply love Kimetsu no yaiba a part of me wishes that WT had gotten this kind of traction.

Also, while the anime played a big role on the rise of the manga that wouldn't have lasted so long if it wasn't for the merits of the story itself. KnY is Jump Manga realized to its full potential.


I completely agree with the second part of your post. There is no doubt that the anime played a big role in its massive popularity, but it isn't the only reason. If people didn't enjoy the manga they would stop buying it after a few volumes and the sales would start to fall off in the later volumes, but the later volumes are selling just as well as the earlier ones.


Well, Ashihara's health is pretty bad. Even before he went on hiatus for 2 years, he would frequently take several unscheduled breaks. So even if the series blew up, it still would've eventually hit a wall.

But make no mistake about it; although World Trigger didn't blow up like Demon Slayer, if you look at how well the volumes were selling before it went on hiatus for 2 years, it was one of the best-sellers in WSJ, consistently selling better than series like My Hero Academia. Really, the only series in WSJ it wasn't outselling during the anime's run was extremely popular series in Japan (at the time) like One Piece, Gintama, Assasination Classroom and Haikyuu. When you look at the newer manga in Jump at the time (WT included in that group), it was easily the best-seller. And surprisingly, sales per volume have gone up since the the manga returned. So although it didn't blow up massively, it's done an incredible job of retaining the fans it got during it's peak (especially when you consider all the 2-year hiatus and several other sudden breaks).


I like WT and miss it, and although the reaction to the adaptation was a surprise (it not only saved the manga from cancellation but also made it popular), it was far from anything big. It beat Toriko, but in its second volume Boku no Hero was already selling more.

TheRahi00 wrote:
Cardcaptor Takato wrote:
It's kind of funny to me how Demon Slayer has come out of nowhere after everyone was hyping up Promised Neverland as the next big shonen hit but now it feels like most people have already moved on from it. Like I'm sure it has manga readers but I rarely see people talking about it on social media like I do Demon Slayer.


I mean, is it really surprising though? Both The Promised Neverland and Dr Stone, could have never been as huge as Demon Slayer, because they are lacking the classic Shounen Jump tropes. To make it short, they don't have fights. Of course, you could argue that they do, but it should be clear what I mean by that.

Special attacks, Names for your moves, Training Arcs etc. Demon Slayer stays true to what people expect from Shounen Jump, while Dr Stone and especially The Promised Neverland, are pretty different.


The funny thing is: for three and a half years having these tropes didn't make Demon Slayer more than a side character in Shonen Jump, while Neverland, without those tropes, was already selling 500k before the anime. So, again, if Demon Slayer is what it is today it's certainly because of the Ufotable touch.
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AutoOps007



Joined: 03 Jan 2014
Posts: 200
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2020 8:58 pm Reply with quote
Bueller wrote:
AutoOps007 wrote:
Kisuke525 wrote:
ThatMoonGuy wrote:
Replica_Rabbit wrote:
Wish, World Trigger was this successful. Anyway, glad Demon Slayer is successful. Probably should get around and read/watch it.
It is odd, that demon slayer is the only Jump manga I avoided. I don't know why I would read Black Clover over it (and I not a fan of Black Clover)


Ditto. WT was my favourite jump manga when it was running there and though I deeply love Kimetsu no yaiba a part of me wishes that WT had gotten this kind of traction.

Also, while the anime played a big role on the rise of the manga that wouldn't have lasted so long if it wasn't for the merits of the story itself. KnY is Jump Manga realized to its full potential.


I completely agree with the second part of your post. There is no doubt that the anime played a big role in its massive popularity, but it isn't the only reason. If people didn't enjoy the manga they would stop buying it after a few volumes and the sales would start to fall off in the later volumes, but the later volumes are selling just as well as the earlier ones.


Well, Ashihara's health is pretty bad. Even before he went on hiatus for 2 years, he would frequently take several unscheduled breaks. So even if the series blew up, it still would've eventually hit a wall.

But make no mistake about it; although World Trigger didn't blow up like Demon Slayer, if you look at how well the volumes were selling before it went on hiatus for 2 years, it was one of the best-sellers in WSJ, consistently selling better than series like My Hero Academia. Really, the only series in WSJ it wasn't outselling during the anime's run was extremely popular series in Japan (at the time) like One Piece, Gintama, Assasination Classroom and Haikyuu. When you look at the newer manga in Jump at the time (WT included in that group), it was easily the best-seller. And surprisingly, sales per volume have gone up since the the manga returned. So although it didn't blow up massively, it's done an incredible job of retaining the fans it got during it's peak (especially when you consider all the 2-year hiatus and several other sudden breaks).


I like WT and miss it, and although the reaction to the adaptation was a surprise (it not only saved the manga from cancellation but also made it popular), it was far from anything big. It beat Toriko, but in its second volume Boku no Hero was already selling more.


Ok, I was wrong about the sales, since only took into account total sales, but the series was still selling better than most series in WSJ when it had it's anime, selling around the same amount as Bleach & Gintama. And the anime didn't save it from cancellation; you don't give anime to series in danger of cancellation, and even let him return to WSJ for 5 weeks after a 2 year hiatus (normally this doesn't happen, and the manga is immediately transferred). Even before then, they stuck with him through several unscheduled one breaks (they could've easily cancelled it back then, due the inconvenience of frequent sudden breaks). And pretty much all anime increase the popularity of the manga (well, at least for ones being adapted for the first time), no matter how good or bad the adaptation is. The question is by how much more popular it will get. It obviously never became super popular, but it has done well to maintain the popularity it had during that time, which is incredible given it went on hiatus for 2 years. People thought the series was dead and buried during that 2 year hiatus, so the fact it's anime is returning is incredible, and also proves that the manga was never in danger of cancellation (when it comes to success or anything other than Ashihara's health).


Last edited by AutoOps007 on Thu Feb 13, 2020 1:26 am; edited 1 time in total
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dcmc



Joined: 25 Jun 2011
Posts: 47
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2020 10:29 pm Reply with quote
ThrowMeOut wrote:

Ditto. Demon Slayer's story is really nothing special, but when you cover it with jaw dropping, gorgeously directed animation that puts many feature films to shame, and also inject some angsty blood 'n guts to hook the teens, yeah you got a recipe for success.

Maybe this show will make producers realize putting some effort into their adaptations instead of slapping out some rushed, half-assed garbage will pay off more in the long run. (Though probably not)

Dissagred on those points,if that was the case,Fire Force would had those success too.
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azhanei



Joined: 21 Aug 2010
Posts: 78
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2020 11:38 pm Reply with quote
Demon Slayer is amazingly animated, sure. The reason it's successful? Characters who feel real and you want to root for and revisit. It's that simple and that hard. The trick will be holding that interest, and many fail. I hope KnY holds on.
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Cardcaptor Takato



Joined: 27 Jan 2018
Posts: 2269
PostPosted: Wed Feb 12, 2020 11:58 pm Reply with quote
ThatMoonGuy wrote:
It doesn't help that TPN moved far away from its initial premise to the point that the mangá is barely recognizable. It begun as a escape thriller and then went on a completely different direction. Honestly, as it is now I find TPN to be an OK manga at most. People were selling the manga a lot on the first arc but everything else is downhill from there.
I haven’t read the manga to know what the later chapters are like but I think it was also hurt by the anime only being 12 episodes instead of doing a two cour like all the other big shonen shows of last year got. It would be like if Fire Force didn’t air the second cour right away and would have killed a lot of the momentum of that early hype. That sort of happened with MHA too where the first season was only 13 episodes and it didn’t really take off until season two.
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JonDoe



Joined: 14 Oct 2019
Posts: 27
PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2020 1:59 am Reply with quote
Cardcaptor Takato wrote:
It's kind of funny to me how Demon Slayer has come out of nowhere after everyone was hyping up Promised Neverland as the next big shonen hit but now it feels like most people have already moved on from it. Like I'm sure it has manga readers but I rarely see people talking about it on social media like I do Demon Slayer.


Promised Neverland was already a big shonen hit before the anime even came out. Hell the manga sold seven million freaking copies in 2019 alone. Those aren't the numbers of a manga that "people have already moved on from". If anything it looks more like a shonen title that a helluva people have started paying attention to.
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Cardcaptor Takato



Joined: 27 Jan 2018
Posts: 2269
PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2020 2:37 am Reply with quote
JonDoe wrote:


Promised Neverland was already a big shonen hit before the anime even came out. Hell the manga sold seven million freaking copies in 2019 alone. Those aren't the numbers of a manga that "people have already moved on from". If anything it looks more like a shonen title that a helluva people have started paying attention to.
But you look at Demon Slayer and it's sold over 40 million copies as of February 2020. As I said, Promised Neverland definitely still has it's following but if you look at the broader fandom, I feel like it didn't make quite the same pop culture mark that Demon Slayer has.
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JonDoe



Joined: 14 Oct 2019
Posts: 27
PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2020 10:45 am Reply with quote
Cardcaptor Takato wrote:


But you look at Demon Slayer and it's sold over 40 million copies as of February 2020. As I said, Promised Neverland definitely still has it's following but if you look at the broader fandom, I feel like it didn't make quite the same pop culture mark that Demon Slayer has.


Demon Slayer hasn't sold 40 million copies, that's ridiculous. It has 40 million copies in CIRCULATION. And I don't get what you mean by "broader fandom" when the fandom that publishers are most concerned about is the one in Japan which easily consumes more anime and manga than any other country combined. Besides, Demon Slayer hasn't even made the same impact on pop culture as other anime titles from years past.
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lossthief



Joined: 14 Dec 2012
Posts: 671
PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2020 11:24 am Reply with quote
Cardcaptor Takato wrote:
JonDoe wrote:


Promised Neverland was already a big shonen hit before the anime even came out. Hell the manga sold seven million freaking copies in 2019 alone. Those aren't the numbers of a manga that "people have already moved on from". If anything it looks more like a shonen title that a helluva people have started paying attention to.
But you look at Demon Slayer and it's sold over 40 million copies as of February 2020. As I said, Promised Neverland definitely still has it's following but if you look at the broader fandom, I feel like it didn't make quite the same pop culture mark that Demon Slayer has.



Looking at the broader fandom TPN was the 4th highest selling manga of 2019. Just because it isn't the #1 smash hit doesn't mean people have moved on from it or it's become at all irrelevant. Folks seem to have this impression that selling 5+ million copies in a year somehow isn't a hit because Demon Slayer hit a bigger spike
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