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NEWS: Shiro Moriya's Soloist in a Cage Manga Ends in Next Chapter on June 14




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GainaxFanboy



Joined: 05 Jul 2017
Posts: 59
PostPosted: Tue Jun 08, 2021 3:01 pm Reply with quote
Finally!!!!! Surprised Surprised Surprised Surprised Surprised Surprised
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Ozzy4k



Joined: 09 Mar 2016
Posts: 135
PostPosted: Tue Jun 08, 2021 9:04 pm Reply with quote
Been really enjoying this manga looking forward to its conclusion
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shosakukan



Joined: 09 Jan 2014
Posts: 242
PostPosted: Wed Jun 09, 2021 12:25 am Reply with quote
Rafael Antonio Pineda wrote:
Ori no Naka no Soloist


The Japanese title of the manga in question is 『檻ノ中のソリスト』.
Since the word 'ソリスト' is the Japanese way to transliterate the French word 'soliste' into katakana and the loanword 'ソリスト' means 'a solo dancer in ballet' in Japan, if you transliterate '檻ノ中の' as 'Ori no Naka no', it may be better for you to transliterate 'ソリスト' as 'Soliste', rather than 'Soloist'.
(The main character of Ori no Naka no Soliste had danced already in the 1st chapter.)
In fact, many ballet-related terms that are used in Japan are 'imports' from France.

The Daijirin dictionary says:
Quote:
ソリスト 【フランス soliste】 ②バレエのソロを踊る踊り手。第一舞踊手。


The title of George Asakura's manga about ballet 'Dance Dance Danseur' having the French word 'danseur' probably reflects Japanese ballet-related people's tending to use French terms.

A chapter of a 1970s shōjo manga classic Tsuru-hime jāq! by Tsuchida Yoshiko is about ballet, and a scene in the chapter is a parody of/a satire on ballet manga/ballet people that use many ballet-related loanwords from French.
Tsuru-hime jāq! was serialised in the Margaret shōjo manga magazine in the 1970s, and in the almost same period, Ariyoshi Kyōko's famous ballet manga Swan, too, was serialised in Margaret.

When you see an Occidental word that was transliterated into katakana in a piece of Japanese text, it is not necessarily an English word.
For example, recently I re-read some volumes from Iwanami's new-edition complete works of Nagai Kafū, and in 「歸鄕雜感」,
Nagai Kafū wrote:
Quote:
 ○寄席に行つて義太夫を聞いたが、第一の印象は、日本のあゝ云ふ音樂は、殆ど音樂ではない樣に思はれた事だ。歌ふ聲は人間普通の音聲であつて、聲樂(ミユジツク、ボカル)として聞くのには、余りに聲柄が脩練されて居ない。樂器に伴はして聲に髙低をつけたまでゝ、若し歌謠の文句を除いたら、歌ふ聲其れ丈けでは、何等の音樂的感興をも生ぜしめぬのであらう。

'ミユジツク、ボカル', which Kafū wrote here, are the transliterated French words 'musique vocale'.

Another chapter of Tsuru-hime jāq! is a funny parody of Yamamoto Sumika's Aim for the Ace!, and Aim for the Ace!, too, was serialised in Margaret in the almost same period as Tsuru-hime jāq!'s.
A scene in the chapter pokes fun at jargon which tennis people/tennis manga use and which is rather esoteric to laymen.
And the scenes related to tennis jargon in the chapter also suggest that girls in the 1970s who started to become familiar with tennis jargon thanks to Aim for the Ace! and the boom in tennis enjoyed tennis jargon that was esoteric to laymen.
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