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Land Stander



Joined: 06 Oct 2015
Posts: 64
PostPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2016 6:35 pm Reply with quote
Lone Wolf and Club has been around in English for a very long time/. And when it was covered by Dark Horse from start to finish it was a very sweet ride for me. I cried at the end for the amazing finish, and sad as well, that it was actually really OVER.

I only recently woke up to the fact that there is also;
New Lone Wolf and Cub
Path of the Assassin
Samurai Executioner
Lady Snowblood
and even Lone Wolf 2100

Can any fans that have tried others tell me what I should go onto next?

LS
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Land Stander



Joined: 06 Oct 2015
Posts: 64
PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2016 6:05 am Reply with quote
A nice time to celebrate Mizuki Shigeru - with the recent arrival of new Kitaro;

Showa: A History of Japan - 1926~1939
Showa: A History of Japan - 1939~1944
Showa: A History of Japan - 1944~1953
Showa: A History of Japan - 1953~1989


Nonnonba
Onward Towards our Noble Deaths
Hitler


Kitaro (400 pages)
The Birth of Kitaro
Kitaro Meets Nurarihyon (Oct 2016)
Kitaro and the Great Tanuki War (April 2017)
Kitaro’s Strange Adventures (Winter 2017)
Kitaro the Vampire Slayer (Spring 2017)
Kitaro’s Yokai Battles (Fall 2017)
The Trial of Kitaro (Winter 2018)

in addition to those;

* Drawn and Quarterly 25 hosts pages of illustrations plus one cool wordless strip.

GeGeGe no Kitaro published by Kodansha in Japan 3 volumes of bilingual stories, eventually bound to overlap D&Q's line of stories

Finally, in Schodt's Dreamland Japan, there is mention of Tales of Mizuki Shigeru containing 5 non-Kitaro fantasy stories. Lovely book which I was able to track down. It is numbered to 300, so if I have one and Fred Schodt has one, that leave 298 more for the finding.

PS - still holding a torch hoping you'all come back for some sharing and discussion.


Last edited by Land Stander on Sun Jun 12, 2016 9:24 am; edited 3 times in total
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Alan45
Village ElderVillage Elder


Joined: 25 Aug 2010
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Location: Virginia
PostPosted: Sun Jun 12, 2016 8:09 am Reply with quote
@Land Stander

Samurai Executioner Is a Lone Wolf & Cub side story based on a character from that series. Essentially if you like the one series you will like the other.

Lady Snowblood Takes place rather later when Japan is much more westernized. It is excellent as well and just as violent.

I haven't tried the others so I can't comment.
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Land Stander



Joined: 06 Oct 2015
Posts: 64
PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2016 8:16 pm Reply with quote
Quote:

Samurai Executioner Is a Lone Wolf & Cub side story based on a character from that series. Essentially if you like the one series you will like the other.


I appreciate it. I went for Samurai Executioner in the omnibus format. Easy to find and not so pricey considering the page volume.
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Land Stander



Joined: 06 Oct 2015
Posts: 64
PostPosted: Wed Jun 15, 2016 8:26 pm Reply with quote
Doraemon, OL, Sazae-san, Devilman, Anpanman, Himitsu Akochan, Ijiwaru Bachan, Zipang, Kobo-chan, Ochibisan; are a portion of the many bilingual manga published in Japan that seem likely to have not crossed the Japanese Sea. There are many lesser know titles as well, but as far as I know, there has never been a very full list, or accounting of them.

Is there any interest among our members here of such kind of manga? I had thought of writing more about them some time when I get around to it or while I'm reorganizing the comix shelves.
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horseradish



Joined: 27 Oct 2015
Posts: 109
Location: California, USA
PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2016 7:28 pm Reply with quote
@Land Stander

I own one volume (5th) from the 12 Sazae-san volumes that Kodansha International brought over between 1997-1999, about 1/4 of the entire 45 volume series. There doesn't seem to be much interest, so the volumes are often still very cheap around $3-15 each online. Each volume has a nice dust jacket and obi. My knowledge regarding Sazae-san was gained through reading Tatsumi's A Drifting Life. Sazae-san is a four-panel newspaper strip that was popular with housewives. It depicts a very traditional post-war Japan before the economic boom in the 1980s. The art is simple and there is not much dialogue, so some dated jokes were harder for me to grasp. I'm unsure if Sazae-san is a great manga to learn Japanese from, since some dialogue may be very old-fashioned. I think the closest American equivalent is The Family Circus strip.

After reading some of Sazae-san, I'm somewhat curious about Ijiwaru Baasan. It's a four-panel strip about a mischevious grandmother by Hasegawa, but I that's all I know.

According to Jason Thompson in his ANN article about the series, Devilman's first volume was published in America in 1986.
Thompson in the House of 1000 Manga column wrote:
Today, Devilman: The Devil's Incarnation is one of the rarest manga ever produced for English. One copy is sitting boxed up somewhere in the Viz offices; I've never seen another copy anywhere.
I've only seen listings for the Verotik Shin Devilman versions while the Kodansha Bilingual versions are imports. If anyone's going to publish Devilman in English now, it's probably going to be Dark Horse or Vertical. I remember reading a scanlation a while ago and was so impressed with the glorious hyperviolence that I stopped after the first chapter. I'll get through the series someday. Laughing

Since I have mentioned the House of 1000 Manga column, Thompson also wrote about some Koike work such as Lady Snowblood and Crying Freeman. Also I hope that Mizuki's encyclopedias about yokai and other supernatural topics will be published in English someday. I like reading about myths and folktales.

I'd like to read some work from Fujio Akatsuka. I enjoyed watching the recent Osomatsu-san show and would watch Osomatsu-kun if someone licensed it for English distribution. The protagonist in Himitsu no Akko-chan, looks very similar to Totoko. I did not know who Akatsuka was until I found out about Osomatsu-san and read A Drifting Life.

Ochibi-san is currently available for Crunchyroll subscribers! There's also a "motion manga" available on Crunchyroll. The short film is still available for viewing on the Japan Animator Expo website. I plan to read it someday as well. I don't know if it's available for people outside of the United States though.

By OL, are you referring to OL Shinkaron? I have less interest in Doraemon, Anpanman, Kobo-chan, and Zipang. The first three are long children's series and I am very cautious about works that focus on the Japanese military after the Meiji period.

I would be interested to hear more, but I don't usually pay attention towards whether or not a manga series has a bilingual version available unless that is the only version with an official English translation. I would be interested to learn more about how manga is chosen for bilingual publication and how well readers learn a different language from bilingual manga. I think bilingual manga would most benefit people who are trying to learn Japanese, which does not include me. I wonder how many posters and lurkers are currently Japanese language students?
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Land Stander



Joined: 06 Oct 2015
Posts: 64
PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2016 8:29 pm Reply with quote
That was an interesting reply. Thanks for that. Since most bilingual comics are published in Japan, they seem to be for Japanese people more than for native English readers. And so I think it helps Japanese people who study or know some English to try out their skill on something that is already fairly familiar to them. A far second goal, I have imagined, is to give native English readers a chance to delve into manga ^ perhaps only in a minor way, learning some Japanese as well.

I also have that "very rare" Devilman book you mentioned (English, not bilingual), and I have made it a bit of a hobby to search out bilingual and other oft overlooked or rare books. But much more rare is the Tales of Mizuki Shigeru limited to 300.

I have the 3 volumes of Ijiwarubasan (Granny Mischief) as well, -, and at least on one volume I have a second copy and am happy to part with it. If you would like it I will send to you. I have no need to get money for it. Let me know.

OL. Yes, and there were actually 2 different series. The 5 (I think) bilingual books and then several small books in English by a different publisher. I am at the office now so don't have my manga shelves in front of me.

There was a book published in Japan about 1985 simplly called Manga - there was no need to call it anything else. It was the first attempt (or nearly so) to bring manga overseas. The first English manga anthology (not bilingual). I have extra copies of that as well..

More on the topic but work is calling..
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horseradish



Joined: 27 Oct 2015
Posts: 109
Location: California, USA
PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2016 10:35 pm Reply with quote
^ Only 300 copies, you say? That's pretty amazing! Some remaining copies are likely damaged or lost, so that's quite a find. I would really like to hear the story about how you found out about the title and how you managed to acquire a copy! Also more information about the title would be appreciated such as copyright year and publisher, since I've never heard of it before. Is that the rarest manga you currently have? Surprised

Also, how did you get that Devilman copy? Details...

Thank you for kindly offering the extra copy of Ijiwaru Baasan, but I already have a lot of stuff sitting around that's waiting to be read. Or watched. Or opened. Maybe a lot of stuff just sitting around really. Laughing

Are you referring to the Manga magazine published by Metro Scope in the early 1980s? Whose work is featured in the anthology?

Edit: Minor grammar and spell-checking corrections.
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Land Stander



Joined: 06 Oct 2015
Posts: 64
PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2016 1:20 am Reply with quote
The Mizuki book was referenced in Schodt's Dreamland Japan within the Mizuki article. Every since I first read that, I had my eyes open for it. I used to have a job that took me in and out of Japanese book stores. I knew it was very rare but I didn't have any idea what it looked like, color, width, or the size. Once I saw this amazing window display for Mizuki in a rare and used book art/shop, showing all kinds of items, many too expensive to imagine buying. There I saw it for the first time, and asked to look, and sure enough it was THE book.

It has a penned in # out of 300, but no signature.
5 stories
- Kappa - Water Imp
- Gokaku - Successful in an Examination
- Yamaha no Orochi - Legend of Orochi Dragon, long ago
- Marui-wa-no-sekai - The World Within the Round Circle
- TV-Kun - TV Boy

That may not be my rarest translated manga though, as I have some "samples" of manga printed by Japanese companies for the purpose of distributing to English language book publishers. They could not have made many of each - I have 6 different ones. One of them is a Tezuka title not yet printed by DMP.

Also I have a large format Golgo 13 which has "sample" printed as part of the title on it. I'm sure not many were made. This must pre-date the 4 other books published in Japan.

As for the book called Manga - - I would not call it a "magazine" as it has cardstock covers, and is square bound.. it is a book.


Last edited by Land Stander on Wed Jun 29, 2016 8:40 pm; edited 6 times in total
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Land Stander



Joined: 06 Oct 2015
Posts: 64
PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2016 1:33 am Reply with quote
And as I am always looking for curiosities, I just purchased;

1 The Manga Story of Jo Niijima - A Quest for Freedom by Shigeru Noda and Takao Cajun
2 A Sequel to the Manga Story of Jo Niijima - the challenge by Shigeru Noda and Takao Cajun
There were 5,000 copies printed of the English translation. Is that small number?
They will arrive tomorrow.

According to the Doshisha University website "The English version is scheduled to be sent to prospective international students via the International Center, and is also distributed to partner universities overseas"

And this one was on my "to buy" list for a couple months but I actually didn't realise it was manga so I put it off. When I found out I ordered it immediately.
What Is Obscenity?: The Story of a Good for Nothing Artist and Her Pussy
by Rokudenashiko

This is my current read. and I am finding it to be my favourite educational manga so far.
Highly recommended.

LS
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Land Stander



Joined: 06 Oct 2015
Posts: 64
PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2016 3:13 am Reply with quote
The anthology Manga includes fan art of Star Wars V, which came out in 1980. So it makes sense that Manga would have been published in 1981 or 1982. In 1983 Star Wars VI was released so I would think 1983 is the cut off.

The Tales of Mizuki Shigeru was published June, 1993 by Kagome-Sha in Osaka. Perhaps the only book they did. There are other names associated with the publication listed in the back of the book.

For OL (Office Lady) by Risu Akizuki there were 3 series of books published in English in Japan, totalling 10 volumes.

The OL Comes of Age - 2 volumes, English with Japanese notes (1994, 1999)
OL Survival in the Office - 5 volumes, bilingual (#1-3 1999, #4&5 2000)
OL Revolution - 3 volumes, English with Japanese notes (all 2005)
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horseradish



Joined: 27 Oct 2015
Posts: 109
Location: California, USA
PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2016 8:45 pm Reply with quote
Thanks for sharing that great story about Tales of Shigeru Mizuki. Must've been so exciting to leave the shop with the book at hand. Wonder if it was close to Mizuki's hometown Sakaiminato or if the display was for an upcoming special occasion for him. Surprised

I don't have a copy of Dreamland Japan: Writings on Modern Manga by Frederik L. Schodt, but I did find the section referring to the book in a Google Books preview. Here is the section for convenience and posterity, which is basically everything Land Stander has said so far:
Schodt wrote:
In 1993, Osaka-area fans published five of Mizuki's stories in English in a beautifully bound limited-edition book titled Tales of Shigeru Mizuki and issued by Kagome-sha. The stories included Kappa ("The Story of the Boy Who Met the Water Imp"), Gōkaku ("Successful in an Examination"), Yamata no Orochi ("The Legend of the Orochi Dragon"), Marui-wa-no-sekai ("The World as a Round Circle"), Terebi-kun ("TV-Kid"). Unfortunately, the book was never sold publicly.


While looking around for more information online, I found a blog post from Zack Davisson, the English translator for several works by Mizuki, that discusses American horror comic influences. A commenter mentions his story about getting his copy signed long ago in the 1990s. I hope those five stories will be available in a different English format someday, if that has not yet happened.

It is very interesting to see biographical manga used for educational purposes. I have heard of educational manga about subjects such as calculus or history. There is even a free digital manga about immunology. Based on the back cover summary I read on Amazon and the articles about him on the Doshisha University website, Jo Niijima had quite an eventful and accomplished life. I don't work in the publishing industry and know nothing about the market for educational manga, so I will guess that 5,000 English copies in Japan seems like a fair number. Since the topic has special significance to the university, they may do reprints later on if necessary.

I had heard about the controversy and plan to get a copy of What is Obscenity?: The Story of a Good For Nothing Artist and her Pussy by Rokudenashiko eventually. Glad to hear that you are enjoying it.

The Manga anthology sounds very unusual and searching for more information online will be difficult. I did not expect Star Wars fan art to be within its contents. Do you know if the anthology became a series or if it was just one volume?

Since OL copies are very cheap on Amazon, I will pick up a copy to check out. I was surprised to learn that it won the short story category for the 2004 Osamu Tezuka Cultural Prize.

Edit: Grammar and spell-checking corrections.
Is this what the book looks like? Very nice if so!
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Land Stander



Joined: 06 Oct 2015
Posts: 64
PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2016 9:20 pm Reply with quote
ah, that is the book exactly. Smile

It is a beautiful one. I bought it in Osaka, where the fans who produced it were from. This is somewhat far from Mizuki's hometown . I have been there as well, and seen the statues along the street portraying his characters.

I can easily imagine that D&Q would go further into his works, but their schedule will be filled for the next year and a half with Kitaro.

Manga is surprisingly easy to find online using the ISBN 4-946427-01-5, and not too expensive, No evidence that there were an subsequent volumes but even so I think it is a book that helped lay the groundwork for further interest in manga. I think a lot of other "unsuccessful" projects can be thanked and credited as well.

So, Horseradish, what kind of manga in English (hitherto unknown to you) would you be really excited to learn about?
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horseradish



Joined: 27 Oct 2015
Posts: 109
Location: California, USA
PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 1:43 am Reply with quote
Wow, it indeed looks beautiful! Looks like a gilded book cover! Anime hyper I like the color combination of navy blue/gold/light grey. You can tell a lot of love was present during the fan production. I would not put it on a dirty floor!

Why, that's the Manga "magazine" I was talking about in an earlier post! ANN has an article that discusses Manga along with Mega Comics (1991) and refers to their format as magazines.
Jason Thompson wrote:
The translations are good and the whole thing is a very nice package, but some curious omissions, like the lack of a publication date or a price on the cover, make it a little more believable that Manga sank from sight so fast and never had a second issue. (Although to be fair, there's no indication that it was intended as more than a standalone. There's not even a US address to send letters to.) Who bought this? Did it get distributed in comic stores? Did anyone review it, and what did they think? I'd like to say that it was ahead of its time, but since it's done so much in imitation of Heavy Metal, I can't really say that. Was it intended to make money and maybe lead to more Mangas, or more as a portfolio piece for the artists who contributed to it?
I am very interested in getting a copy someday because it has a story from Hiroshi Hirata. His art is amazing. Have you read Satsuma Gishiden? Unfortunately sales were so low that Dark Horse didn't release the last two volumes.

Hmm, that's a tough question! I suppose the type of manga that was featured in Garo in anthology formats. Some work from contributors have been published in English, such as AX: Alternative Manga, Secret Comics Japan, and Comics Underground - Japan. The first post in this thread explains it well. Especially out-of-print English manga from independent or defunct publishers. Looking through a translator's or publisher's work helps sometimes, along with copyright pages. Have you read Kingyo Used Books? I will probably give the series a read for references. Work before Astro Boy or Tezuka in general (mid-1940s) is also obscure. For example, the Tank Tankuro book from Presspop discussed in the previous page. Onward Towards Our Noble Deaths actually mentions Presspop in the special thanks section on the copyright page, but I am otherwise unfamiliar with the company. I assume most things within in the broad scope of the thread's original purpose.

It also remains important to build awareness, excitement, and support about upcoming alternative manga from small publishers with this thread. I'll try to remember to post about stuff I find out here too...

---

The Osamu Tezuka Story: A Life in Manga and Anime has been available for pre-order for a few months now. It is about $20 on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Rightstuf. Copies signed by Schodt are available through the Stone Bridge Press website. Over 900 pages! I was hoping for a translation by Schodt someday. Very Happy
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Land Stander



Joined: 06 Oct 2015
Posts: 64
PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 8:22 am Reply with quote
If I had seen that picture while I was looking it would have helped enormously. hahaha Wherever did you find it?

I have a pretty deep to-read pile right now, which includes the 3 volumes Hiroshi Hirata series. I didn't know that it was left unfinished in English.
BTW do you have Samurai Son of Death with art by Hirata? it's an oldie.

Yes - the initial post is what drew me to this group, I'm sorry I was so preoccupied when this group was more active.

I used to do book-hunting, and other collectible finding as a side gig, so I got in the habit of getting extras of whatever was cool out there that interested me. Even though it has been years, I still have some nice extras around. If you like, I'll send you Manga. Just IM your address.

You may be interested in a couple older projects;

Tokion was a bilingual high-brow low-brow Japanese art and everything magazine - - I'm not sure if it is still around. The first 10 issues or so had a pull out bilingual comic. They were all GARO/AX . The comics had paper covers, and some did not pull-out so well, but delicious stuff. I most recall reading 2 Neko Jiru stories, who I was in love with at the time. So sad she killed herself. Anyway - I can make a full list of the comics and post that in a few days.

2000 L'Association is a big bad-ass collection of all wordless comics
https://www.amazon.com/Comix-2000-Lassociation/dp/284414022X/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1467292524&sr=8-6&keywords=l%27association+2000

There are not so many pages of Japanese comics but if you are looking for something you have never seen you will find in this volumes; Suzy Amakane, Kazuichi Hanawa, Hideshi Hino, Hironori Kikuchi, Yoshihiro Koizumi, Hideyashi Moto, Okuda Robot, and Muddy Wehalla.
There are loads of other great artists besides.

I don't know Kingyo Used Books. I'll pick it up~
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