Interest
Director Shinkai Edits 'your name.' Ending Credits for 1st TV Broadcast

posted on by Jennifer Sherman

The New Year's holiday in Japan brings a variety of television specials, including anime programs and marathons. This time, fans can look forward to the first television broadcast of Makoto Shinkai's smash-hit film your name. The film will air on TV Asahi networks on January 3. The film's television debut will feature an exclusive version of the ending credits edited by Shinkai himself.

Mone Kamishiraishi, who voices Mitsuha in the film, will also narrate a special promotional spot for the broadcast. The spot will feature an alternate version of Mitsuha's lines from the film. Both Kamishiraishi and Ryunosuke Kamiki, who co-stars as Taki in the film, said they are looking forward to the broadcast.

The film centers on Taki, a high school boy living in Tokyo who works part-time at a restaurant, and Mitsuha, a high school girl living in a town in rural Japan who wants to live in the city. One day, they begin switching bodies every time they sleep, and have to find a way to communicate with each other to manage each other's lives. Later, when they try to meet up physically for the first time, Taki discovers a secret that will lead to a race against time to try and save each other.

The film has opened in 92 countries and territories, earned numerous accolades, and broken various theatrical screening records in Asia. The anime opened in Japan in August 2016 and has since become the highest-grossing anime film of all time globally. In Japan, the film became the fourth highest-grossing film of all time, the second highest-grossing Japanese film, and the second highest-grossing anime film.

A live-action Hollywood adaptation of the film by Paramount Pictures and J. J. Abrams' Bad Robot Productions is in the works. Eric Heisserer (Arrival, Final Destination 5) is penning the script.

Source: The Mainichi Shimbun's Mantan Web


discuss this in the forum (10 posts) |
bookmark/share with:

Interest homepage / archives