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Shigeru Mizuki's Showa 1953-1989: A History of Japan Wins Eisner Award

posted on 2016-07-23 01:47 EDT by Crystalyn Hodgkins
Drawn & Quarterly anthology that includes work by Yoshihiro Tatsumi also wins award

The 2016 Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards ceremony announced this year's winners on Friday at Comic Con International in San Diego. Shigeru Mizuki's Showa 1953-1989: A History of Japan (Volume 4 of Showa: A History of Showa Japan) won this year's Best U.S. Edition of International Material—Asia award. Drawn & Quarterly published the manga in North America.

The title competed against:

  • Yusei Matsui's Assassination Classroom (volumes 2-7, published by Viz Media)
  • Kaoru Mori's A Bride's Story (published by Yen Press)
  • Hokusei Katushika, Takashi Nagasaki, and Naoki Urasawa's Master Keaton (volumes 2-4, published by Viz Media)
  • Yoshitoki Oima's A Silent Voice (published by Kodansha Comics)
  • Taiyo Matsumoto's Sunny (published by Viz Media)

Drawn & Quarterly's release of Shigeru Mizuki's Showa 1939-1944: A History of Japan and Showa 1944-1953: A History of Japan won the Best U.S. Edition of International Material—Asia award last year. Mizuki passed away in November at age 93.

Drawn & Quarterly: Twenty-Five Years of Contemporary Cartooning, Comics, and Graphic Novels, an anthology that includes work by Yoshihiro Tatsumi among other artists, won the Best Anthology award.

Manga creator Rumiko Takahashi (Urusei Yatsura, Maison Ikkoku, Ranma 1/2, Inuyasha, RIN-NE) was nominated for the Will Eisner Comic Awards Hall of Fame this year, but this year's Hall of Fame awards went to Tove Jansson, Carl Burgos, Rube Goldberg, Jacques Tardi, Lynda Barry, and Matt Groening.

The Boys Love Manga and Beyond: History, Culture, and Community in Japan — edited by Mark McLelland, Kazumi Nagaike, Katsuhiko Suganuma, and James Welker — was nominated in the Best Academic/Scholarly Work category, but The Blacker the Ink: Constructions of Black Identity in Comics and Sequential Art — edited by Frances Gateward and John Jennings — won the award.

Yen Press' release of Svetlana Chmakova's Awkward was nominated in the Best Publication for Teens (ages 13-17) category, but Jillian Tamaki's Super Mutant Magic Academy won the category.

Sources: The Beat, Heidi MacDonald


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