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Resident Evil/Onimusha Co-Composer Admits His Music Was Ghostwritten

posted on 2014-02-05 12:20 EST
Mamoru Samuragochi credited with music for over a decade after losing his hearing

A lawyer for 50-year-old deaf composer Mamoru Samuragochi said on Wednesday that another person has been writing the music that has been credited to him for over a decade. Samuragochi's credits include Biohazard Symphony Op. 91 "Crime and Punishment" in the Dual Shock version of Resident Evil, the symphonic suite "Rising Sun" in Onimusha, and the commemorative piece "Hiroshima Symphony." Samuragochi is also credited for "Sonatina for Violin," a piece that Japanese figure skater Daisuke Takahashi is scheduled to use in his short program this month at the Winter Olympics.

All four of these musical pieces and more were released after Samuragochi lost his hearing completely at the age of 35.

The composer's lawyer said, "I've been told that there are certain circumstances that make it hard for the person [who composed the works] to come out in public, and Samuragochi has come to describe himself as the sole composer." He added that the composer said "it is totally inexcusable and he deeply regrets (what happened). He is mentally distressed and not in a condition to properly express his own thoughts."

Nippon Columbia will stop selling his CDs, and Tokyo Hustle Copy will cancel the latest release of Samuragochi's sheet music next Tuesday. Samon Promotion is cancelling his upcoming performances and refunding ticket buyers.

Source: Japan Times, Sankei Sports via Hachima Kikō

Image © Nippon Columbia

Update: Takashi Niigaki, the part-time music school teacher who allegedly composed the musical pieces for Samuragochi, held a Thursday press conference in which he outlined what happened. He asserted that Samuragochi was not actually deaf, but could not write sheet music. Thanks, omiya. Source: Australian Broadcasting Corporation


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