Editorial: An Open Letter to the Industry

by Justin Sevakis, Nov 25th 2007

The following editorial is solely the opinion of its writer and does not necessarily reflect the views of Anime News Network or its affiliates.
日本語

These are good times to be an anime fan. DVD's have never been cheaper. If you're not into buying DVD's or don't have the money, you can download DVD-quality copies over the internet for free and never have to worry about anything bad ever happening to you, ever.

Consequently, these are downright terrible times for anybody in the anime industry. DVD sales are way down, profits are even lower, and a good number of companies are losing money hand-over-fist. Even in Japan, many productions aren't breaking even. People in both the US and Japan are feeling like it's the apocalypse.

The decline of the anime industry and the influence of fansubs on said decline is probably the most talked-about issue in the scene today. The pros have discussed it worriedly amongst themselves for years, but only recently are they speaking out about its damaging effects. Every time they do, and we post about it here on ANN, there's a firestorm of debate about exactly how bad fans should feel about downloading. Occasionally, industry people will pop in to argue for more guilt.

I understand the panic going on. I've seen the numbers myself. They're terrifying. It's not uncommon now for a DVD to not even make back the cost of the dubbing, let alone the license fee. When only a few years ago it was commonplace for shows to get licensed for $70,000 or more per episode, today a show can be licensed for less than half of that. And they're still not profitable.

Clearly, the business model is failing. People realize this, but nobody's actually doing anything about it. Rather than take decisive action, the industry keeps trying the same things it's been doing for years, and when that inevitably doesn't work, the fans who download are blamed. Which makes sense. After all, they're getting the product but not paying for it. Most people would call that stealing.

Now, if this was something new, perhaps I'd have a little more sympathy when the rights holders cry victim. However, the fansub scene is approaching voting age at this point, and digitally transmitted fansubs started circulating about a decade ago. Every year they've gotten more and more widespread (with the historic popularity of Naruto pushing them into complete prominence). And to date, those rights holders have done very little to stop them. There is now an entire generation of anime fans who have never been forced to pay a single dime to get their anime fix.

I do not blame the fans who download with impunity and don't buy a thing. Their attitudes, while damaging, are simply a reflection of the value of anime, which these days, is about $0.00.

That's right. Anime that has been fansubbed is effectively worthless. It's being given away for free. In terms of supply and demand, there is an infinite supply, and therefore the product is worthless regardless of how many people want it – it's like trying to sell buckets of sea water to people on a beach. The only people who would pay for it are either older fans who are attached to the old ways of consuming media, or worse, are doing so out of charity.

That is the state of this industry. And the companies who depend on anime for their livelihood let this happen.

 

HOW DID WE GET HERE?

When I was a fansubber back in the VHS days, fansubbers felt lucky if more than a few hundred people saw their fansubs. Copies degraded with every generation, tapes wore out (and never looked great to begin with), and the whole thing was very ephemeral. You had to have connections to get fansubs, or be one of the few that knew how to use the internet to make contact with a distributor. Even if you already had a fansubbed anime when it was licensed, the legal copies were usually far superior in quality.

Digital fansubbing changed everything. Suddenly, an infinite number of very high quality copies could be made. Advances in data compression, computer horsepower and broadband connectivity over the years means that now even the least motivated fan can easily find, in English, whatever new is coming out in Japan merely days after it airs on TV.

The internet, that strange beast that now shapes our modern world, effectively takes distribution out of the hands of the rights holder and puts the consumer in charge. Now, even the smallest release – an airing on a satellite TV channel in a small island country, for example – can be put on the internet and distributed to millions of people, should somebody be motivated enough to upload it. Anime fans, being younger and more technically savvy than most demographics, quickly adopt these new methods. And since the internet is global, so is the fansub market.

That few hundred people from the early days has now become hundreds of thousands of people worldwide. However, fansubs are not like music in that anybody can rip a CD and upload it; they take quite a bit of work (and usually a small group of people) to produce. As those fansub groups have to then upload to everybody else, they should make for an easy legal target.

The domestic distributors, to their credit, have made limited attempts to get shows they've licensed taken offline, but their legal arsenal is limited to a Cease and Desist letter. Many of the more self-serving groups have discovered that these can safely be ignored, and little else will ever happen. Worse, by the time a domestic distributor licenses a show the fansub is likely to have been circulating for months. The damage is already done. With few exceptions, the Japanese side of the industry has not even done this much.

Legal rights, such as copyright to an anime, must be defended if they're to be recognized. Anime has not been defended to any effective degree.
 
Arthur Smith, president of Gonzo Digital Holdings International, recently compared the downloading of fansubs to breaking into the Apple Store and stealing an iPhone the day before it's released. This is incorrect for several reasons. Debate on physical property versus digital copies aside, if one breaks into an Apple Store, an alarm goes off, the police come, and if you're caught you go to prison. There's also a window and a few locks you'd have to break, and you could injure yourself in the process.

If we're to adjust Smith's statement to be truly factual, downloading a fansub would be something more akin to Apple leaving their entire stock of iPhones on a busy street corner with no locks, no guards, and a big sign that says “iPhone”. If the Apple store manager came in the next day and saw that all of them were stolen, he would file a police report and the police would laugh at him. If he then REFILLED the entire stock, still did not buy any locks or hire any guards (but added a small sign that says “please don't take me”), a couple people might start to feel a little bad, but they're still going to come back for more, and probably bring some friends too. Eventually that Apple store would go out of business, and most people would agree that they deserved to.

The point is this: You can't guilt people into buying something they don't want. If you can't make them want it, you simply don't have a business.


GETTING OUT OF THE RUT

To effectively understand the problem, one must understand two things: why people make fansubs, and why people download fansubs.

People make fansubs for one reason: to share cool new shows they like. (There are other personal reasons, of course, such as improving their Japanese skills and braging rights.) People watch fansubs because the American releases take years to come out (if they come out at all). Once on DVD, they often have to be bought sight-unseen, which sometimes works for movies on DVD but is an unrealistic commitment for TV series. To younger fans, DVD's are also very expensive.

There is currently no legal way for any of these needs to be met. As the anime industry has not given these customers what they want, these freshly empowered consumers are taking it themselves. Therefore, even if massive, expensive lawsuits were filed against fansubbers, the problem would not stop. Stopping current fansubbers would create a market vacuum. Fans would just find another way (and, as Odex recently discovered, they'd be very angry as well).

Before legal action will be effective, fansubs must be replaced. THERE HAS TO BE A LEGAL, INEXPENSIVE WAY TO WATCH NEW ANIME IN ENGLISH. Not necessarily own, but at least watch.

ADV Films and Funimation know this and have both attempted to fill this void with television networks, streaming and download services. However, neither can offer a show newer than a year old.

There are myriad ways of supporting such a venture. A low subscription price. Advertising. But it has to exist, and it has to be easier to use than bittorrent. It has to show new anime DAYS after it airs in Japan. It has to be available to most of the world. It can't lock out Mac or Linux users. All of these are reasons people will use to justify continued piracy.

Only then, after there is no reason for a fansub to exist other than pure greed, can a few choice lawsuits against a few prominent fansubbers scare the rest of the scene into compliance.

DVD sales would also return to their proper place, as the collectable for fans who really liked the show and want to keep their own copy. However, as packaged media declines, media companies must stay light on their feet so they can quickly adjust to new technologies as they start becoming more commonplace.

This is merely step one of a long road to recovery. But it's not a step that can be avoided.


DRAGGING THEIR FEET

This is easier said than done. The Japanese entertainment industry is infamous for being a labyrinthine, Brazil-esque muddle of red tape. Only the very highest executives of the producing companies can cut through the red tape, and to date they have shown little intention of doing so.

I can't name specifics here, as I don't wish to betray my confidences, but so far I've been given two primary reasons for this seemingly obvious solution not being put into action already.

The first is fear of change. Simply, the older companies that made their bones in the publishing business are scared to death of the internet and the threats it makes to their existing business. The logical fallacy here is that the internet has already impacted their existing business, and by not taking advantage of new technology, there's no new revenue to compensate for the lost old revenue.

More than anything, the rights holders are terrified that by allowing internet distribution, they might cut into the domestic Japanese market, upon which the entire industry now depends. This would be a valid fear if it weren't for the fact that everybody in Japan can already download HD-quality raw files (illegally) if they want to. If the otaku are still buying DVD's, an English subtitled stream would not make a difference. And even if they did watch (and weren't blocked), wouldn't many of those viewers want to buy the DVD as well?

The other reason is that these companies seem to be under the mistaken impression that American anime fans and their buying practices are nearly identical to Japanese otaku. Of course, nothing could be further from the truth. American fans are younger, and are usually not nearly the “collectors” that their Japanese brethren are. Few will pay $55 for a half hour OAV, or even two TV episodes. But more importantly, they're not getting the TV airing that allows them to watch the show in the first place.

To make matters worse, as budgets have fallen the producers have compensated by making more shows that appeal to very specific niche audiences. (Moe, anyone?) While these shows will never be big, they're a short-term solution to keeping the all important Japanese otaku market paying the bills. Their audience in the States, while vocal, is even smaller.


LAST CHANCE

No matter how many appeals the industry makes to fandom, nobody is going to stop downloading. If something is free and available, people are going to take it. That's a fact of life, and no amount of guilt and blame will change that.

The industry is now at a crossroads, where the effects of all this is finally causing significant financial problems before new anime even gets made. The jobs of many talented artists and the countless other people that make up the Japanese animation industry are on the line. The current system is broken beyond repair, and to make money again, the entire way things work needs to be rethought from the ground up.

And those in charge can do it now, or watch their companies and a once thriving, fascinating creative landscape slowly die out.

But it has to be now.




「アニメ業界へ」:公開書簡

ジャスティン・セバキス


現在はアニメファンにとってとてもいい時期だ。DVDの値段がここまで下がったことはないし、DVDが買えない(又は買いたくない)場合でも悪いことが起こる心配もなくインターネットから無料ダウンロードすることができる。

その結果アニメ業界で活動している人にとって今はかなり悪い時期になっている。DVDの売り上げは急減し、利益はそれよりも急減しているせいで業界の会社は赤字を抱えている。日本でも数多くの作品は収支が合っていない。米国でも日本でも業界はもうおしまいだと感じている人が多い。

ファンサブ(日本製アニメにファンが英語等の字幕を付けたもの。基本的に違法)が影響するアニメ業界の衰退は業界の最大な話題になっているといって間違いない。ここ数年業界ベテラン達の間での不安そうな会談はあったが、ファンサブの悪影響について公に話すようになったのはほんの最近である。アニメ・ニューズ・ネットワーク(米国の大手アニメ情報サイト)の掲示板(フォーラム)では「アニメファンはダウンロードに関してどれぐらい罪悪感を持てばいいのだろう」という激しい論争が毎回巻き起こる。たまに、業界の一員が話に参加し、「ファンが悪い」と叫ぶ。

私には業界のパニックが分かる。業界の一員として、数字が非常に悪くなったのも理解している。今の業界でDVDではもうアフレコのコストさえ賄えないし、ライセンス費が賄えるということなど益々考えられない。ほんの数年前までアニメ一話のライセンスは約7万ドルで買われていたのに、現在ではその半分以下で買える。それでもまだ利益が出ない。

明らかに業界の今のビジネスモデルはだめになってきている。それを理解している人もいるが、解決に向かって誰も動いていない。断固たる行動を取るよりも今までのビジネスモデルをただ繰り返し、予想どおりに失敗してから「ダウンロードするファン」のせいにする。確かに無料で作品を手に入れればただの盗みにはなるのだが。

もちろん「ファンサブ」がまだ新しい問題であったならばもっと著作権保持者の苦情に関する同情を喚起するかもしれない。しかし「ファンサブ」は以前からあったもので、インターネットによるファンサブ配信など10年の歴史がある。年々大きくなってきた「ファンサブ」は、爆発的な人気の「ナルト」の影響で顕著な業績を上げた。しかし今まで著作権保持者は「ファンサブ」を拒否する動きをひとつも見せなかった。その結果アニメを見るためにお金を払ったことがない世代が育ってきた。

私は著作権を無視してアニメを無料でダウンロードするファンを責めない。彼等の態度はアニメの現行価格を反映しているからだ。今アニメの価値はゼロである。

そう、「ファンサブ」されタダで配られているアニメに価値はない。需要供給の法則に例えると、どんなに沢山の人たちが欲しがっていても、無限に供給があるアニメの価値はゼロ、いってみれば海辺にいる人達に海水を販売しているような状態だ。実際買ってくれるのは、購買動向に慣れている年配のファンと、チャリティーと思ってくれるファンに限定される。

これが今のアニメ業界状態である。しかもこういうふうにしたのはアニメに頼る業界の会社だ。


どうやってここまで来たのか?

私が「ファンサブ」を作っていたVHS時代では、数百人がそのファンサブを見てくれればいいほうであった。コピーしたファンサブはVHSテープの古さや世代とあわせて質が低下し、また、最初からそんなにうまくできていなかった。その上その時代のファンサブは短命なもので、ファンサブを作る人の知り合いやその時代に珍しかったインターネットを使用できたファンのみが見られた。そしてそのアニメがもしアメリカ国内で後正当に販売されることが決まった場合、当然だが販売されたアニメはファンサブ済アニメより品質がかなりよかった。

「デジタル・ファンサブ」がそのシステムを全体的に変えた。突然上質コピーが無限に作れるようになった。データ圧縮、パソコン馬力、広帯域(ブロードバンド)アクセスの進歩によって、今ではアニメが日本での放送後ほんの数日(あるいは数時間)後に誰でもインターネットでそのアニメの英語版を簡単に手に入れることができるようになった。

我々の世界を変えたインターネットという不思議な怪物が「配信プロセス」を著作権保持者の手から消費者の手へと渡した。その結果アップロードをしたいと思えばどんな作品でも(例えば小さな島国のサテライト放送番組でも)数百万人に配信することが可能になった。一般の年齢層より若く技術的心得があるアニメファンはこの配信方法にすぐ慣れた。全世界につながっているインターネットと同じくファンサブ市場も全世界的だ。

昔の数百人が急に数百万人になったと言って間違いはない。しかしファンサブはCDをコピーしてアップロードするだけのような誰にでもできる音楽とは違い、団体で沢山の時間を使ってする大変な作業である。それに完成したファンサブをインターネットにアップロードするのはもちろん必要なわけだから、その団体に対して法的措置を取るのは難しくないはずである。

アメリカ国内販売業者が許諾した製品の不法インターネット配信を止めるための動きを少しでもしていることは称賛に値するが、彼等の法律行為能力は使用停止を願う文書の提出に限られている。利己的なファンサブ団体が文書を無視すればそれ以上何もならないケースが多い。その上大抵アメリカ国内販売業者がライセンスを買う時ファンサブ版はもう何ヶ月もインターネット上で流通されていることが多い。ほとんどの日本アニメ会社もこの問題を無視してきたので、もう後の祭りである。

法的権利(アニメの著作権など)は主張されないと認識されないものである。今までアニメの権利は効果的に主張されてこなかった。

最近のインタービュー記事で株式会社GDH(ゴンゾ・デジタル・ホルディングス)の社長アーサー・スミス氏は、ファンサブのダウンロードとアップル・ストアから販売開始前のiPhoneを盗むこととを比べた。この類推はあっていないと思う。物質的かデジタルかの違いはさておき、もしアップル・ストアから物を盗んだ場合、アラームが鳴り、警察が現われ、捕まったら牢屋に連れて行かれること間違いない。ドアや窓ガラスも割れば、怪我もするかもしれない。

スミス氏の類推をもっと現実的にファンサブのダウンロードと比べられるものに変更すると、アップル・ストアの店長がロックもない警察もいない人通りの多い街角に「iPhone」と書いた看板と在庫すべてのiPhoneを置く、ということになる。もしその店長が翌日その街角に戻りiPhoneが全部盗まれたことに気付いて警察に苦情を訴えれば笑われるだけだろう。もしその店長がロックも付けず警察もいない街角に再びiPhoneを置き、看板に「盗まないでください」と付け足したとしたら後ろめたく思う人が少しでも現われるかも知れない。が、ほとんどが友達を連れて盗みに戻って来るはずだ。その後そのアップル・ストアが倒産してもほとんどが「当然だ」と言うだろう。

つまり人に罪悪感を抱かせても買いたくないものを買わせることはできない。客が製品を欲しがらなければ「ビジネス」はない。


マンネリを越える方法

この問題を理解するためには、まずこの二つを知る必要がある:なぜファンサブは作られるか、そしてなぜファンサブはダウンロードされるか。

アニメファンがファンサブを作る理由は一つ:気に入った新アニメを他のファンに見せたいため(日本語能力を高めたい、太鼓判を押さえたいという個人的な理由もたまにある)米国版は日本版の数年後にならないと発売されないし、ライセンスを買った会社がそのまま作品を売らないケースもあるから、人はファンサブを見る。それに、予告編も見ていないのにテレビアニメのDVDを買うのは非現実的なシステムである。特に若いファンにとってDVDの値段は高すぎる。

現在、この消費者のニーズを満たす合法的な方法はない。アニメ業界から欲しいものを貰えない消費者は新しく身に付けたパワーを使い自分自身で欲しいものを取っている。その結果もしファンサブ団体を相手に莫大な費用をかけて訴訟を起こしたとしてもこの問題は終わらないだろう。ファンサブ団体を取り除いたところに真空効果が起こるし、ファンはどうせほかの方法を考え出すだけなのだ。その上、シンガポールの販売業者Odexの事件でもあったように、彼等はとても怒るだろう。

ファンサブ団体に対する訴訟を有効にするためには、ファンサブの代わりを作る必要がある。合法的で安く最新アニメ作品を英語で見られる方法だ。所有方法でなくても、見ることだけでもできる方法を考えないといけない。

アニメ販売業者ADV FilmsFunimationはこの事情を把握し、テレビ・ネットワーク、ストリーミング、デジタル・ダウンロードという方法で真空を埋めようとしている。しかし両社とも1年以上も古いアニメしか提供できない。

低料金での購読、宣伝など新ビジネスプランの運営を支援する方法は沢山ある。しかしその方法はBittorrent(現在ファンサブ流通に最も好まれているファイル共有法)より使いやすくないといけない。新番組も日本放送の数日後には世界各国から見られるようにしなくてはいけない。マッキントッシュやリナックス使用者を追い出さない方法も必要だ。そうしないとファンサブは続く。

ファンサブ団体が存在する理由が強欲のみになった地点で目立つファンサブ団体に対し訴訟を起こし、その他を怖がらせ規則に従わせることができるようになる。

その後DVDも、ファンが作品を気に入ったときに買う製品として市場に戻ってこられる。しかし包装メディアの人気さが下がってきているため、メディア会社もすぐ新しい技術になれることができるような柔軟性が必要だ。

この企画は復活への長い道のりのたった一歩である。しかし避けられる一歩ではない。


わざと遅らせている

もちろん、口で言うのは簡単だ。日日本芸能業界は迷路のように複雑な手続きが多いことで評判が大変悪い。そこを通れるのは制作会社の最高幹部のみなのだが、未だに迷路を通る様子は見せていない。

信頼を裏切りたくないので詳細は公表できないが、この問題がなぜまだ解決されないのかということに対して理由を二つもらった。

その一つは新しい方法への懸念である。簡単に言うと、古い出版社にとってインターネットは恐ろしいものであり、今のビジネスプランの存在を脅かしているものとしている。もちろん残念ながら同インターネットは既に今のビジネスプランに影響を及ぼしているので、この新技術の利点を生かさない場合、無くなる利益はあっても新しい利益は入ってない。

何よりも権利者にはもしインターネット配信を許可すれば、全業界が頼る日本国内のアニメ業界にまでひずみがくるのではないかという恐怖心がある。しかしその気になれば誰にでも日本で(違反で)HDデジタル・ダウンロードが既にできるため、これはあまり意味のない恐怖心だ。オタクがまだDVDを買っているのだから、英語字幕付きのストリーミングをしたところで何も変わらない。それに、そのストリーミングを見たおかげでDVDを買いたくなるかもしれない。

もうひとつの理由は日本のアニメ会社がアメリカのアニメファンと日本のオタクは同じだと勘違いしていること。これは全く不正確。アメリカのアニメファンは日本のオタクより若く、日本人のように収集家みたいなファンではない。テレビアニメ2話か30分のOAVのために55ドルを払う人はほとんどいないし、大体アニメのテレビ放送が見られないからアニメに関する判断ができない。

さらに、下がる予算に合わせプロデューサーは「萌」のような小人数にしかアピールしないアニメを作る。このような番組が大人気になる可能性はないのだが、これは短期的解決で、大切な日本人オタクに市場の請求書を払ってもらうための手段だ。アメリカにもこのような番組のファンはいるが数は益々少ない。


最後のチャンス

どれだけ業界がファンに訴えても、ダウンロードは止まらない。無料で手に入れられるのであればもちろん人は持っていく。これは人生の現実で、どれだけ罪悪感や非難があっても変わることではない。

アニメ業界は今問題の岐路に立っている。この問題の影響がいよいよ新アニメ制作前からも大きな予算問題をつくっている。有能な漫画家、その他アニメ業界で働いている沢山の人達の仕事の有無がかかっている。現在のビジネスモデルは修理不可能だ。利益を再び出すためには、ビジネスモデルを最初から再考する必要がある。

最高幹部が行動を開始するか、それとも作り上げた会社と一度は繁盛だったアニメ業界がだんだんなくなっていくのを見ていなければならない。

行動の時は今だ。

Translation by Evan Miller.

Around The Web