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Dennō Coil Wins Award from Japanese Sci-Fi Writers (Updated)

posted on 2008-12-02 13:14 EST
Past winners included Barbara Ikai, Innocence, Mardock Scramble, Eva, Gamera, Domu

The Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of Japan have announced on Tuesday that Mitsuo Iso's Dennō Coil anime series and Yūsuke Kishi's Shin Sekai Yori (From the New World) novel series have won this year's 29th Nihon SF Taishō Awards. The Dennō Coil anime series adapted Yūko Miyamura's novel of the same name. The story centers on children who are drafted to investigate hackers in a future Japan transformed by augmented reality. Dennō Coil aired in Japan from May to December of 2007.

Dennō Coil already won a Seiun Award from the 46th Japan Science Fiction Convention (Nihon SF Taikai or Japan SF Con) in August. The Nihon SF Taishō Awards are the rough Japanese equivalent of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America's Nebula Awards, while the Seiun Awards are the rough Japanese equivalent of Worldcon's Hugo Awards. Previous winners of the Nihon SF Taishō Awards include Moto Hagio's Barbara Ikai manga, Mamoru Oshii's Innocence anime film, Tow Ubukata's original Mardock Scramble novels, Hideaki Anno's Neon Genesis Evangelion anime series, Shusuke Kaneko's Gamera 2 film, and Katsuhiro Otomo's Domu manga.

Dennō Coil director Iso also won an individual award at the anime industry's 13th Animation Kobe Awards in September. At the Tokyo International Anime Fair in February, Dennō Coil shared the honors in the television category in the 7th annual Tokyo Anime Awards with Gainax's Tengen Toppa Gurren-Lagann. It also won an "Excellence Prize" in the 2007 (11th) Japan Media Arts Festival Awards from Japan's Ministry of Cultural Affairs last December.

Source: animeanime.jp

Update: The anime version of Dennō Coil was released after screenwriter Yūko Miyamura's novel version, but the two versions were created simultaneously. Thanks, nargun.


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