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Project Anima Announces Results of 'Kids/Game' Anime Contest

posted on by Egan Loo
Möbius Dust about police unit fighting terrorism after meteorites disrupt Japan

The official website for Project Anima announced on Wednesday that Hajime Shinagawa's Möbius Dust story is the grand prize winner for the "Kids/Game" category of the competition. Doga Kobo (Majestic Prince) will produce an anime adaptation of the work that is tentatively slated for after 2020.

Project Anima describes the story:

On February 29, 2000, the Möbius meteorites fell on Earth. These meteorites brought a new form of matter known as Möbius Dust to Earth. The dust permeated Earth's atmosphere, leading to a miracle. The day the meteorites fell, nicknamed "2.29," accelerated the economic disparity in Japan.

Before long, the Bloody War Alliance, discontent with this disparity, began committing acts of terrorism. Amidst all this, the police established the anti-RC special mobile unit and a joint anti-RC training school for the initial training of the unit members.

In addition to an anime adaptation, Shinagawa will receive a monetary prize of 1 million yen (about US$9,000) at an award ceremony that will be held at AnimeJapan 2019 in the Tokyo Big Sight venue on March 23.

The "Kids/Game" category accepted submissions with stories featuring protagonists who are 15 years old or younger, or stories ideal for development as role-playing games, adventures games, trading card games, and other kinds of games. The category was further divided into novels/scripts, manga, and story proposals or other forms of submission for judging. Submissions were accepted from both professional and amateur creators, as well as from both individuals and groups such as companies from August 1 to November 15.

The electronic and mobile commerce company DeNA's editors and producers were judges for the first phase. DeNA, advertising agency and sponsor Sotsu Co., Ltd., radio station Nippon Cultural Broadcasting, and radio and television company Mainichi Broadcasting System judged the second wave of the competition along with Doga Kobo producers. Directors joined the judges for the final stage of judging.

Each category of the project has different application and judging periods. The project announced the winner for the "Science-Fiction/Robot" category in August, with Nekotarō Inui's Sakugan Labyrinth Marker (Drilling Labyrinth Marker) novel as the runner-up. (The judges did not award the novel a grand prize.) An anime adaptation by Satelight is slated for 2020.

The project announced the winner for the "Alternate World/Fantasy" category in October, with Yuzuki Akasaka's Mahō Tsukai ni Narenakatta Onna no Ko no Hanashi. (The Story of the Girl Who Couldn't Become a Wizard, pictured left) novel as the grand prize. An anime adaptation by J.C. Staff (Revolutionary Girl Utena, Toradora!, Flying Witch) is slated for 2021.

Project Anima accepted story submissions from the general public through DeNA's MangaBox, Everystar, and similar user-submitted content platforms. The companies are hosting competitions in three categories.

Project Anima is a collaboration between companies to make three television anime in different genres for the 2020 broadcast season or later. Mengo Yokoyari (Scum's Wish) drew the project's main visual (pictured right).

The project allows submissions in the form of novels, scripts, manga drafts, thumbnail sketches, illustrations, videos, and other formats. The project also accepts submissions from both professional and amateur creators, as well as from both individuals and groups such as companies. In addition to the television anime adaptations, the three main partners and the collaborating productions companies will explore other adaptations for the winning entries such as books, manga, and games.

Sources: Project Anima's website, Comic Natalie


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