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'Anime no Tane' Animator Training Program Reveals 4 Projects for 2021

posted on by Crystalyn Hodgkins
Imagica Digitalscape, Studio Elle, Production +h., Lesprit to each create anime shorts for project

The Japanese government's Agency of Cultural Affairs announced on July 12 the four studios that will participate in the latest round of its "Anime no Tane" program to train young animators.

The studios Imagica Digitalscape, Studio Elle, Production +h., and Lesprit will each produce an animation project from seven to 10 minutes in length. The works will aim to raise the skill level of existing animators, and educate aspiring animators.

The details of the works are as follows:

Studio: Imagica Digitalscape
Title: "Tenjin" (temporary title)
Director: Noriyuki Fukuda
Producer: Tomoya Iwasawa
Training Target: In-between animators, key animators, 3DCG animators

Studio: Studio Elle
Title: "Rockin' Oyone" (temporary title)
Director: Akira Shigino
Producer: Suguru Shakagōri
Training Target: In-between animators, key animators, production advancement, producers

Studio: Production +h.
Title: "Uchū Camper Chicchi" (temporary title)
Director: Masatsugu Arakawa
Producer: Fuminori Honda
Training Target: In-between animators, key animators, producers

Studio: Lesprit
Title: "Kirakira Kirari☆" (temporary title)
Director: Tomohiro Tsukimisato
Producer: Kanako Shimizu
Training Target: In-between animators, key animators, producers

The Agency of Cultural Affairs announced the project last year, and last year's project featured four works.

The initiative is the latest iteration of the Agency of Cultural Affairs' "Young Animator Training Project," which aims to train young animators on-the-job. The agency launched that project in 2010 under the "Anime Mirai" name, with the aim of fostering the growth of domestic animation studios, and tackling the concern that more of the Japanese animation process is being outsourced overseas. The project was later renamed to Anime Tamago. The project has spawned such works as Little Witch Academia, Death Billiards (which inspired the Death Parade television anime), and Ongaku Shōjo.

Sources: Agency of Cultural Affairs' website, Animation Business Journal (Tadashi Sudo)


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