Review

by Rebecca Silverman, Apr 17th 2012

Brave10

Episodes 7-12 streaming

Synopsis:
Brave10 Episodes 7-12 streaming
Sanada continues to assemble his ten brave warriors before finally announcing just why it was that he needed that specific number – each brave represents a specific element necessary to offset the others and the group is a mix of complimentary types intended to work together. This is all well and good until one of the group does something unexpected, resulting in a desperate battle to save not only the country, but each other as well. Will Sanada's goal for his Brave 10 pan out?
Review:

In some ways, it is hard to believe that Brave10 was not based on an otome game. The central cast is primarily comprised of attractive men, none of whom are blood related to our plucky heroine, and everyone has a unique visual style and set personality type, from “dark and brooding” all the way down to “shota bait.” But then there's Ana and some of the villainous women – with their oversized bosoms and underclothed other body parts, surely they were meant to appeal to the same sort of audience that enjoys watching buxom babes commit violent acts? Of course, then we go back to heroine Isanami. With her name a barely concealed reference to Shinto creation goddess Izanami, ruler of the land of the dead, she has all the hallmarks of an otome game heroine but all the annoying perkiness of the token girl in a cookie cutter shounen action show. And let us not forget Sasuke the ninja, who is never without his cute forest friends, or Kamanosuke the androgynous who is just a doujinshi waiting to happen, or the token pirate...What all of this is getting at is that, for its attractively animated fights and creative costumes, Brave10 is a show that remains unsure of its audience to the end. Nice to look at but light on plot, it never quite manages to live up to its potential.

The second half of Brave10 picks up right where the first left off – by continuing to assemble its ten warriors. In a twenty-four episode show, this might be permissible, but when you only have half that many to tell your story, such pacing is, if not unforgivable, at least highly inadvisable. Brave10 is so concerned with its title, in fact, that it leaves out little details like character development and major plot points, giving most of these episodes the feel of some sort of bishounen Pokémon game as Sanada scrambles to catch 'em all. While small efforts at characterization and development are made – Sasuke clearly has feelings for Isanami, for example, and Saizo and Ana share a past – by the time the big reveal comes in episode nine, we don't care enough for the characters to care that one of them has done something unexpected. The story tries to give us reasons to feel some empathy for at least one of the players, but it has spent so long just gathering the cast that even those whom we have known from the first episode seem a bit cardboard, robbing the fighting that takes place from episode ten to the end of any great impact. It is hard to be invested in a life-or-death battle if you do not have any emotional stock in the combatants living.

Fortunately the fighting looks good. The animation is fluid and swift, with dazzlingly impossible moves performed by ninja and samurai of all stripes as they do their level best to kill each other. Obvious CG intrudes in some battles, particularly those involving insects, and this doesn't work as well as the high flying action, but overall it is easy to admire the fights even if you aren't invested in their outcomes. Nonfighting animation is less impressive, with static props and Sanada looking decidedly bosomy in the last episode through the gap in his kimono. Blood is present when characters are wounded, but it is not gushing madly, serving instead as a reminder that somewhat has been injured. At times it feels a bit lacking, but the fact that it remains on clothing long after the injury is important to the scene is a good touch.

Had Brave10 had more episodes, it could have been a much more enjoyable show. As it stands, however, it is unevenly paced and unreliably plotted and peopled, making it less than excellent. After taking too long to assemble a too large cast and throw some bad guys at the viewer, the ending fight, which is presumably supposed to be pivotal, proves less than enthralling, mostly because we simply don't care enough about Isanami and Saizo, or, for that matter, Sanada. Viewers with a firm historical background will probably get more out of the final episodes than those without, although those same historically informed viewers may find themselves groaning at the creative interpretation of the times. So once again, we are left with what we began with – Brave10 is a show that looks good and sounds good, but when it comes time to watch it, it falls far short of any of the many marks it could have set for itself.

Grade:
Production Info:
Overall (sub) : C-
Story : D
Animation : B-
Art : B-
Music : C+

+ Attractive animation and artwork, some nice voicework provided as well. Good fight scenes.
Spends too long on character gathering and not long enough on plot, leaving us with an unevenly paced show it is difficult to invest in.

Director:Kiyoko Sayama
Series Composition:Mamiko Ikeda
Script:
Mitsutaka Hirota
Mamiko Ikeda
Michiko Yokote
Storyboard:
Akitaro Daichi
Yukio Nishimoto
Kiyoko Sayama
Episode Director:
Takayoshi Morimiya
Takayuki Murakami
Yūsuke Onoda
Kiyomitsu Sato
Kiyoko Sayama
Kaoru Yabana
Yorifusa Yamaguchi
Risako Yoshida
Music:Seikou Nagaoka
Original creator:Kairi Shimotsuki
Character Design:Yukiko Ban
Chief Animation Director:Yukiko Ban
Animation Director:
Mariko Emori
Kazuyuki Igai
Kensuke Ishikawa
Yūsuke Isouchi
Maki Kawano
Satomi Matsuura
Minoru Morita
Maki Murakami
Junko Nakamura
Mutsumi Sasaki
Shuuji Takahara
Ken Takahashi
Yuka Takemori
Hitomi Tsuruta
Hideyuki Usutani
Yuuko Yamada
Nanae Yonemoto
Naoto Yoshida
Sound Director:Satoshi Motoyama

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Brave10 (TV)

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