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NEWS: Japanese Box Office, September 13-14




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Jayhosh



Joined: 24 May 2013
Posts: 972
Location: Millmont, Pennsylvania
PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2014 10:03 pm Reply with quote
Still sad about Marnie's low box office numbers. It was a beautiful film.
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MarshalBanana



Joined: 31 Aug 2014
Posts: 5404
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 2014 6:18 am Reply with quote
So has When Marnie Was There still not turned a profit?
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Polycell



Joined: 16 Jan 2012
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 2014 8:47 am Reply with quote
Not unless it was made for less than $16 million.
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Jayhosh



Joined: 24 May 2013
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Location: Millmont, Pennsylvania
PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 2014 9:23 pm Reply with quote
No, sadly. Neither did Kaguya, and from what I've heard, The Wind Rises either. Both of those films had extremely large budgets for Japanese animated films. And I'm assuming Marnie did too. That's why they have to restructure their business and production now. It's sad. Not even the most popular animated films in Japan can turn a profit anymore it seems. That, or maybe it was just Miyazaki's name the whole time. All I know is, Takahata is a master and deserves more recognition.
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enurtsol



Joined: 01 May 2007
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 2014 10:27 pm Reply with quote
Jayhosh wrote:

No, sadly. Neither did Kaguya, and from what I've heard, The Wind Rises either. Both of those films had extremely large budgets for Japanese animated films.


Wind Rises earned over $113 million with a budget of $30 million.

They always earn their money back when the discs come out locally and internationally, and Ghibli films tend to sell for years, long shelf-life.

'Spirit' fades for famed Japan animation studio after Miyazaki signs off

  • Besides the gaping hole left by Miyazaki, Ghibli, like Japanese companies in other industries, faces a range of challenges: high payroll costs, low productivity and the rise of new and cheaper hubs for production elsewhere in Asia.

    Senior producer Toshio Suzuki made waves last month when he said in a series of interviews that Studio Ghibli might have to dismantle the expensive production system set up under Miyazaki, which included employing full-time animators in Japan.

    Suzuki said the studio would take a break and could re-launch with a different and lower-cost business model that could shift production from Japan to Southeast Asia or Taiwan.

    QUALITY – AT A PRICE

    Famous for starting production without a complete script, Miyazaki insisted on working in pencil and spurned computer animation, resulting in intricately drawn frames and very long production spans. Some feature animations consist of about 10,000 drawings, but Ghibli’s sometimes exceed 80,000.

    In fact, Ghibli, under Miyazaki, made a virtue of its high-cost approach, doing everything - and working deliberately - from an ivy-covered, three-storey building in Tokyo's western suburbs.

    Ryusuke Hikawa, an expert on Japanese animation, estimates Ghibli was averaging just five minutes of animation production a month, given its recent pace of producing a feature every two years.

    That was sustainable when the studio, with Miyazaki at the helm, was turning out consistent hits. The nine Ghibli films that he directed averaged a box office take of $115 million.

    Box office takings are particularly important for Ghibli because the company has limited spin-off merchandising, another break from the approach of Hollywood studios which long ago abandoned hand-drawn animation for computers. In June, Suzuki, 66, told a podcast for fans he had cautioned staff to keep merchandising sales below $100 million to sharpen the focus on movie-making.

    In part, as a result, Ghibli has had a volatile earnings record, according to credit rating agency Tokyo Shoko Research, which audited the studio’s books. In the fiscal year that ended March 2012, it earned $9 million. That dropped to $5 million in 2013 and then jumped to $30 million in the just-ended fiscal year, reflecting the success of Miyazaki’s last film, “The Wind Rises”.


Without Hayao Miyazaki's earning potential, Ghibli can no longer sustain full-time animators - they'd have to go "project seasonal" (hiring animators when there's a film project, letting them go in-between projects).
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Jayhosh



Joined: 24 May 2013
Posts: 972
Location: Millmont, Pennsylvania
PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 10:21 am Reply with quote
I'm aware of that, but I think I saw somewhere (maybe an official statement) that it still didn't turn a profit for some reason. I don't know why it wouldn't. And unfortunately I don't have a link to prove it, but I'm pretty sure I saw an article about it.

Quote:
Without Hayao Miyazaki's earning potential, Ghibli can no longer sustain full-time animators - they'd have to go "project seasonal" (hiring animators when there's a film project, letting them go in-between projects).


That's what Takahata always does.
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