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NEWS: Academy Awards Revises Animated Feature Rule


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walw6pK4Alo



Joined: 12 Mar 2008
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:10 pm Reply with quote
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The definition now states that animated movies that are longer than 40 minutes but shorter than 70 minutes can be considered in the animated feature film category.


So what, movies longer than an hour and 10 minutes can go for the main Academy Awards? What exactly what the rule before?

Maybe this is just worded awkwardly.
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MorwenLaicoriel



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:17 pm Reply with quote
For a moment I was confused, but this just means that the minimum has been decreased, right? I don't know if this'll have a major impact on anime...however, it's good shorter features can be nominated now.
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Splitter



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:22 pm Reply with quote
I think they just lowered the minimum runtime limit... though I have no idea why or what for.

Toy Story 3 better be included for Best Picture when the noms come out. I don't care if the year is barely halfway through. I will cry foul if it is not in the running come February.
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enurtsol



Joined: 01 May 2007
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:23 pm Reply with quote
walw6pK4Alo wrote:
Quote:
The definition now states that animated movies that are longer than 40 minutes but shorter than 70 minutes can be considered in the animated feature film category.


So what, movies longer than an hour and 10 minutes can go for the main Academy Awards? What exactly what the rule before?

Maybe this is just worded awkwardly.


Yes, ANN should had made it clearer that this new rule is an addition to, not a replacement of, the old rule.

As the Hollywood Reporter clears it up:

Under the old rules, a film had to be at least 70 minutes to be considered. Under the new rule, an animated feature will qualify if it is longer than 40 minutes, which is consistent with the running time requirements for feature films in all other categories.

The running time for a motion picture to qualify as an animated, live action or documentary short film has been and continues to be a maximum of 40 minutes.

The previous 70-minute threshold for an animated feature had left a gap for ani films that ran between 40 and 70 minutes, effectively preventing them from being able to qualify as either features or shorts.


I wonder if this heralds the comeback of "double-bills." Laughing


Last edited by enurtsol on Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:27 pm; edited 1 time in total
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SoloButterfly



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:24 pm Reply with quote
less than 70 minutes? If I'm not mistaken most Disney films run in the 80+ minute range so all of them are out. I mean the standard for a film for a long time was around the 90 minute range. This sounds more like Animated Short Film rather than feature film Confused

Edit: ah, thanks enurtsol for clearing that up.


Last edited by SoloButterfly on Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:29 pm; edited 1 time in total
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lkmjr



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:25 pm Reply with quote
"Shorter than seventy minutes"? So anything longer than an hour and ten minutes is out? "Animated" does not mean "short". Anime aside, that kills the chances for way too many long animated films.

edit: Glad the above post explained that. it would have made more sense if they had just said "longer than forty minutes" and left it at that...
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Yuki_Kun45
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:29 pm Reply with quote
Other than now films barley at the feature length mark (45 minutes) can qualify this really doesn't mean much for anime. Currently most anime is still released 1-2 years AFTER it's debut in Japan. Even if the situation is best and it's picked up for distribution within months if it played in Japan first tough luck.

For a film to qualify it has to have played in the U.S. in LA for at least one week at general admission. So unless Japan makes an animated film and sends it to the states this means nothing.

Granted Disney usually gets a Miyazaki film in bending this rule (as to how is really beyond me other than they are Disney and probably have a few of their own in the Board.)

So yeah...slow news week?
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machetecat



Joined: 06 Jan 2010
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:34 pm Reply with quote
enurtsol wrote:


As the Hollywood Reporter clears it up:

Under the old rules, a film had to be at least 70 minutes to be considered. Under the new rule, an animated feature will qualify if it is longer than 40 minutes, which is consistent with the running time requirements for feature films in all other categories.

The running time for a motion picture to qualify as an animated, live action or documentary short film has been and continues to be a maximum of 40 minutes.

The previous 70-minute threshold for an animated feature had left a gap for ani films that ran between 40 and 70 minutes, effectively preventing them from being able to qualify as either features or shorts.


I wonder if this heralds the comeback of "double-bills." Laughing
I was about to completely flip out until I read this. Most animated films here are longer than an hour an 10 minutes, and to put them in the non-animated genres are unfair and would be a serious hindrance for potential Oscars.

Stupid Academy should have said the rule was extended to movies longer than 40 minutes, or said that movies longer than 40 minutes, but shorter than 70 minutes would also be included in the category.

Also, stop motion animation should be considered animation. It's no different than a 3D animated film, except they're built by hand instead of built in a computer program and a human is making them move instead of the program.
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enurtsol



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:37 pm Reply with quote
Yuki_Kun45 wrote:
Other than now films barley at the feature length mark (45 minutes) can qualify this really doesn't mean much for anime. Currently most anime is still released 1-2 years AFTER it's debut in Japan.


"1-2 years" after the J-theater release is still fine. IIRC, here's how the rules work:

If an anime film is released in Japan between Jan-1/Dec-31 2010, then it must be released in a L.A. theater for a week within Jan-1/Dec-31 2011 to qualify for the 2011 Academy Awards.
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RestLessone



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:45 pm Reply with quote
Good news for shorter films, and I agree about motion capture. It's fine when people add more to it and mess around with it, but by itself...Basically, look at Brad Bird's thoughts on the subject and you'll get mine.

Splitter wrote:

Toy Story 3 better be included for Best Picture when the noms come out. I don't care if the year is barely halfway through. I will cry foul if it is not in the running come February.

Seriously. It was so incredibly emotional and simply fantastic. I'm not sure if it stands a chance winning, though. What films have been just amazing this year? Are there any that sound promising? Not that there aren't great films, but either I haven't seen them or they're just not to the Best Picture award level.

machetecat wrote:

Also, stop motion animation should be considered animation. It's no different than a 3D animated film, except they're built by hand instead of built in a computer program and a human is making them move instead of the program.

Except it's not stop motion they're targeting, it's motion capture. Basically, it means recording movement and then digitally adding or translating it into 3D (and sometimes 2D) effects or with effects. What Avatar did. Motion capture is more a tool--people can use it, but should also add their own touches to perfect it (creating a sort of animation instead of relying solely on a person's movements). By itself, it's more like make-up.
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GATSU



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:48 pm Reply with quote
Would've been nice to give that allowance when Blood could compete. Rolling Eyes Though at least it kept Dead Leaves from being eligible.
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enurtsol



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 10, 2010 11:55 pm Reply with quote
machetecat wrote:
enurtsol wrote:

The previous 70-minute threshold for an animated feature had left a gap for ani films that ran between 40 and 70 minutes, effectively preventing them from being able to qualify as either features or shorts.
[/i]

Stupid Academy should have said the rule was extended to movies longer than 40 minutes, or said that movies longer than 40 minutes, but shorter than 70 minutes would also be included in the category.


Yeah, I noted that 40-70 min gap when I first read the rules when the Academy created a separate Best Animated Feature category. At least now, years later, they've finally fixed the gap. The old rule would had disqualified 50-60 minute animated films (like an anime movie based on a TV series), particularly those comprising one-half of a double-bill.


machetecat wrote:

Also, stop motion animation should be considered animation. It's no different than a 3D animated film, except they're built by hand instead of built in a computer program and a human is making them move instead of the program.


It always was. Note Wallace and Gromit and Caroline. What the new rule would disqualify may be Avatar.

Now, there's still the issue of rotoscoping.... Laughing
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Sovay



Joined: 17 Apr 2010
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 11, 2010 1:03 am Reply with quote
I doubt this will change much aside from expanding the nominations. Regardless, Toy Story 3 will probably win it this year. It'll suffer the same unfortunate fate as Up did last year, a nomination that no one will take seriously in the expanded best picture category and a win for best animated feature.
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Brack



Joined: 15 Oct 2005
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 11, 2010 2:11 am Reply with quote
The phrasing is really odd though - "motion capture alone" - are there any films that are using motion capture without using animators to process the movement captured? Or to animate the non mo-cap parts of the film?

Mo-cap is in a weird place, on one side you've got animation fans who don't want to see Robert Zemeckis' horrible mo-cap films nominated for Animation Oscars and on the other you've got people like Cameron downplaying animators impact on mo-cap films, claiming that the performance is all from the actors being mo-cap'd.

And what about actors doing mo-cap'd performances embellished by animators? Are they eligible for the performer awards?

I suspect we'll see these rules updated multiple times in the coming years.
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Ggultra2764



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PostPosted: Sun Jul 11, 2010 10:24 am Reply with quote
machetecat wrote:
Most animated films here are longer than an hour an 10 minutes, and to put them in the non-animated genres are unfair and would be a serious hindrance for potential Oscars.


Disney's Beauty and the Beast and Disney/Pixar's Up have received Academy Award nominations in the past for Best Picture which means that someone must have cared that they could be on par in quality with live-action works, even though they've never won the award. The big issue that's keeping any animated works from being treated equally as a live-action film is that many in the West don't see animation as a serious visual medium like live-action films, hence Animation Age Ghetto.
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