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Blade of the Immortal Gets Official Sequel Manga in May

posted on by Rafael Antonio Pineda
Kenji Takigawa, Ryū Suenobu pen Bakumatsu-era story; "important announcement" teased

The June issue of Kodansha's Monthly Afternoon magazine revealed on Thursday that Hiroaki Samura's Blade of the Immortal manga is receiving an official sequel manga titled Mugen no Jūnin - Bakumatsu no Shō (Blade of the Immortal - Bakumatsu Arc). Kenji Takigawa is writing the story, and Ryū Suenobu is drawing the art, with Samura credited for collaboration. The current issue also shows a preview of the manga. It will launch in the magazine's next issue in May 25.

In addition, the magazine teases an "important announcement" for the Blade of the Immortal manga in the next issue.

The sequel is set in the Bakumatsu period in the 19th century (the original manga was set in the earlier Edo period), and follows the main character Manji, who starts the story in a life of seclusion in the Tosa domain, but heads to the capital for a certain reason. The story will have him confronting the strongest warriors of the time. The magazine's preview shows famous historical figures, such as Sakamoto Ryōma, as well as Shinsengumi members Okita Sōji, Kondō Isami, and Hijikata Toshizō:

Samura launched the Blade of the Immortal manga in Kodansha's Monthly Afternoon magazine in December of 1993, and he completed the series in 2012. The manga's 30 volumes have more than 5 million copies in print, and the series has been published in 22 countries and territories. The manga earned an Excellence Prize in the manga category of the 1st Japan Media Arts Festival Awards in 1997, and it won the Eisner Award for Best U.S. Edition of Foreign Material in 2000. Since ending Blade of the Immortal, Samura has published the historical manga Harukaze no Snegurochka (The Spring Breeze Snow Maiden) and the romance Nami yo Kiite Kure (Waves, Listen to Me).

Dark Horse Comics published the Blade of the Immortal manga in North America, and is rereleasing it in omnibus form. The manga already inspired a television anime in 2008, and Media Blasters released it in English.

Takashi Miike's live-action film adaptation of the manga premiered in Japan in April 2017. The film ranked at #6 in Japan in its opening weekend, selling 145,000 tickets and earning 189 million yen (about US$1.68 million). It premiered in North America at Fantastic Fest in Austin, Texas in September 2017. The film then had a wider theatrical release in November 2017.

Source: The Mainichi Shimbun's Mantan Web


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