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INTEREST: Black Clover Spinoff Artist: 'Most Manga Artists Don't Realize What Their Work Means to Ot




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GoldCrusader



Joined: 25 Apr 2017
Posts: 952
PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 4:19 pm Reply with quote
I'm sure he is speaking for many mangaka.

I actually interacted with this mangaka on Twitter. I said I was hoping Viz would license the series here and he responded with a big thank you. Seems like a very nice person. I wish him success.
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OjaruFan2



Joined: 09 Jul 2018
Posts: 133
PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 4:20 pm Reply with quote
Dang. Never knew these situations happened to manga artists. The only thing I already knew was this:
Quote:
They live alone in a tiny apartment, hardly eating or sleeping.
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samuelp



Joined: 25 Nov 2007
Posts: 2081
Location: San Antonio, USA
PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 5:16 pm Reply with quote
OjaruFan2 wrote:
Dang. Never knew these situations happened to manga artists. The only thing I already knew was this:
Quote:
They live alone in a tiny apartment, hardly eating or sleeping.

To be brutally honest, this statement applies to quite a number of Japanese people, whether or not they are a manga artist.
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Яeverse



Joined: 16 Jun 2014
Posts: 726
Location: Indianapolis
PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 7:42 pm Reply with quote
I wish they all have twitters. Then again some twitter fans are pretty rude and mean and I can only imagine sometimes so artists driven to despair over twitter.
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SWAnimefan



Joined: 10 Oct 2014
Posts: 615
PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 8:03 pm Reply with quote
Яeverse wrote:
I wish they all have twitters. Then again some twitter fans are pretty rude and mean and I can only imagine sometimes so artists driven to despair over twitter.


Probably best they don't go on social media. Too much negativity with criticisms and false praise. And say one wrong thing, could end your career.
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Kyo Hisagi



Joined: 01 Jul 2017
Posts: 98
PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 8:35 pm Reply with quote
Яeverse wrote:
I wish they all have twitters. Then again some twitter fans are pretty rude and mean and I can only imagine sometimes so artists driven to despair over twitter.

Some artists do have twitter (ONE, Yuusuke Murata for example). But they don't understand English so me and other fans can't reach them anyway.
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Blackiris_
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Joined: 06 Sep 2013
Posts: 413
PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 9:37 pm Reply with quote
^While most Japanese are not great at English, most of them will be able to understand messages of gratitude sent to them.
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TdFern 87



Joined: 03 Jun 2017
Posts: 148
PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 11:31 pm Reply with quote
Man Manga Artists deserve a holiday in their honor or something that shows the appreciation they deserve. I feel so bad since they & pretty much many other Japanese workers who have to work in such twisted conditions
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Juno016



Joined: 09 Jan 2012
Posts: 1865
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 11:05 am Reply with quote
Blackiris_ wrote:
^While most Japanese are not great at English, most of them will be able to understand messages of gratitude sent to them.


This! I can't emphasize this enough!

I only use twitter for work and to follow my favorite industry people (manga, doujin, animators, directors, etc.), but several of them have become aware of their global fanbase through twitter and they're shocked. Konaka Chiaki (writer; Digimon Tamers, Serial Experiments Lain) recently joined twitter and realized his Western fame when hundreds of non-Japanese followers started responding to his tweets and following them. He even decided to stay on twitter after he originally intended his stay to be temporary and started making lots of English posts. Porigoshi (key animator for Trigger) was a guest artist on Steven Universe and has since dedicated a lot of his time happily interacting with and posting for his newfound global audience. Neither speak particularly great English, but that doesn't stop them. Other doujin artists, like Sayori (Nekopara) and Oyari Ashito (Littlewitch Academy Romanesque), have gained global followers on twitter and facebook that they regularly post for, and now I work as a translator for a doujin artist's work myself.

Seriously, the surprise these creators have and the joy it brings them that their work is recognized around the world and not just locally is... important to them. Enough that many go out of their way to say hello and create custom sakuga animation videos or artworks for these fans in their excitement. One of the artists I met through this has been suffering from what seems like depression for a while. When I met him, he told me he cried for a whole day and cooked his first full meal in a few months to celebrate. Now he does so regularly and is focusing on his own health over pleasing his boss because I helped his followers become aware of his dilemma. He was given courage by them to stand up for himself, even at the cost of deadlines or efficiency. His boss even got on twitter and posted publicly on his page that he was happy to give him time to recover, which he since has. One of my favorite personal humanitarian stories I'll never forget.

(hopefully I'm not exposing who I am on twitter or who I work for--I still want to share, but if you know, please keep it to yourself since my twitter account is tied with my work)
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Fuzzy Pickles!



Joined: 30 Jan 2013
Posts: 25
PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 2:48 pm Reply with quote
Agreed wholeheartedly. This is why people in art industries in Japan, especially manga and anime, put up with horrific working conditions and unforgiving bosses, because their work brings satisfaction and happiness to their fans. It's not like they receive any other perks.

I respect any professional mangaka who sacrifice their livelihood for the arts even if I have no interest in their works.
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Agent355



Joined: 12 Dec 2008
Posts: 4472
Location: Crackberry in hand, thumbs at the ready...
PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 12:58 am Reply with quote
It's not that I doubt him, but as awful as the punishing schedules of manga-ka are known to be, don't most manga-ka work with art assistants in a studio? At least, the moderately successful ones?
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