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Experiments in the Anime Industry - noitaminA


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ikillchicken



Joined: 12 Feb 2007
Posts: 7271
Location: Vancouver
PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2010 8:04 pm Reply with quote
Quote:
Leavitt then noted that the Noitamina experiment worked, and showed a slide of the ratings of each show. The highest rating for each show peaked out between 3.7 and 6.6 percent. Leavitt noted that 6.6 percent is an average rating for television dramas and news shows, and that comparitively, most ratings for late night anime are between 0 and 1 percent.


That's really great to hear. I've always believed that there was still a lot of unmet demand for real high quality, experimental and innovative anime and this seems to support that idea.
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dtm42



Joined: 05 Feb 2008
Posts: 14082
Location: currently stalking my waifu
PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2010 9:01 pm Reply with quote
Just look at those titles there. Tokyo Magnitude 8.0 is one that I absolutely love, and Eden of the East, House of Five Leaves and The Tatami Galaxy were all okay. I've heard good things about Honey and Clover, Nodame Cantabile, Moyashimon and Trapeze, and the first two are on my "to watch" list.

Basically, the success rate for this block is extraordinary, and it is one of the best bastions of quality Anime left. It might only produce a few titles a year, but quality is a wonderful yet underrated thing.
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RedTail



Joined: 25 Aug 2004
Posts: 176
PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2010 11:38 pm Reply with quote
I honestly felt the Goblin Cat arc of Ayakashi: Japanese Classic Horror was brilliant. Mononoke, the spin-off series, is pretty damn good as well. I'm hoping FUNi can license rescue Ayakashi and grab Mononoke too. They'd be a good double feature-type release.
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reanimator



Joined: 25 Nov 2007
Posts: 1306
PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2010 11:40 pm Reply with quote
For anyone who is interested in Noitamina's 2005-2008 list of ratings, please check the following link:

http://www.pelleas.net/aniTOP/index.php?title=the_new_season&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1#c10935

For people who like behind-the-scene stuffs, Anime Style (Japanese) did in-depth interview with Noitamina's producer, Koji Yamamoto

Interview part 1
http://www.style.fm/as/13_special/mini_interview/noitamina_1.shtml

Interview part 2
http://www.style.fm/as/13_special/mini_interview/noitamina_2.shtml
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Pandadice



Joined: 17 Dec 2008
Posts: 181
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 8:19 am Reply with quote
ikillchicken wrote:
Quote:
Leavitt then noted that the Noitamina experiment worked, and showed a slide of the ratings of each show. The highest rating for each show peaked out between 3.7 and 6.6 percent. Leavitt noted that 6.6 percent is an average rating for television dramas and news shows, and that comparitively, most ratings for late night anime are between 0 and 1 percent.


That's really great to hear. I've always believed that there was still a lot of unmet demand for real high quality, experimental and innovative anime and this seems to support that idea.


Wow, it seems almost ridiculous to me that someone would call humdrum slice-of-life anime "experimental".

"a series about a workaholic's job and her love life? what a zany and out of the box concept!"

I mean sure, sure it's got Yojouhan which is totally experimental. But you can't judge the success of the block based on one of the most recent titles..

I mean honestly, if there was a call or demand for real experimental anime, then we'd probably see more from Studio 4°C. and they wouldn't be left doing in-between works and outsource jobs like Transformers the Aniamted Series.
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minakichan



Joined: 12 Nov 2003
Posts: 1101
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 12:54 pm Reply with quote
Pandadice wrote:
Wow, it seems almost ridiculous to me that someone would call humdrum slice-of-life anime "experimental".

"a series about a workaholic's job and her love life? what a zany and out of the box concept!"

I mean sure, sure it's got Yojouhan which is totally experimental. But you can't judge the success of the block based on one of the most recent titles..

I mean honestly, if there was a call or demand for real experimental anime, then we'd probably see more from Studio 4°C. and they wouldn't be left doing in-between works and outsource jobs like Transformers the Aniamted Series.


CLEARLY YOU HAVE NOT SEEN KUCHU BURANKO.

http://aninomiyako.files.wordpress.com/2009/10/kuchu-buranko.jpg

Craziest s--- in existence.
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AlexLeavitt



Joined: 02 Apr 2009
Posts: 3
Location: Boston
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 1:08 pm Reply with quote
Thanks for the article write-up.

If anyone has questions, check out my blog -- http://doalchemy.org -- where you can find my contact info.

I'm hoping to put this panel on again at New York Anime Festival, if anyone will be there.

(And, just for clarification, I'm a researcher in the CMS department at MIT, not a grad student.)
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yuna49



Joined: 27 Aug 2008
Posts: 3155
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 1:32 pm Reply with quote
Noitamina's primary rationale was to showcase anime productions that targeted adults, particularly college-aged and older women. The original spate of titles like Honey and Clover, Nodame Cantabile, Paradise Kiss, and Hataraki Man all fit that concept.

I think it was the success of Ayakashi Horror Tales, particularly the Bakeneko arc and its successor Mononoke by Nakamura Kenji, that established noitaminA as a place for more experimental works. As was just mentioned, Nakamura's latest work, Trapeze, follows in that tradition; Hakaba Kitaro and Moyashimon both have some unusual animation in them as well.

Still I wouldn't call noitaminA primarily a place for "experimental" works as much as a series of shows for adults. It certainly continues to be one of the few sources of anime I watch regularly.
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omoikane



Joined: 03 Oct 2005
Posts: 428
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 1:32 pm Reply with quote
You guys should see the ratings for Trapeze and Tatami Galaxy. They're not very high compared to shows like Nodame and Honey & Clover.

there's a particular audience that noitamina draws from and it's nothing very special once you boil it down. they got their start pandering to girls, it's that simple. it's only recently they've been trying to broaden the lineup, with mixed results.
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yuna49



Joined: 27 Aug 2008
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 1:40 pm Reply with quote
Mononoke drew audiences rather comparable in size to Nodame and sold around 12-15,000 units per DVD release. Now I suppose you could attribute the success of this show to its bishie lead, the Apothecary, but I don't think fangirling alone was the cause for its success both on television and when sold as DVDs.
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Megiddo



Joined: 24 Aug 2005
Posts: 8038
Location: IL
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 1:50 pm Reply with quote
Woah, do you have a source for those numbers of Mononoke? Unfortunately the only thing ANN has with numbers is the DVD box set that also had the Bakeneko part of Ayakashi which sold 5k.

But when you look at this and see that Mononoke was 10th on the list on its debut week, I find it hard to believe that it sold over 10k units per volume. The Bakeneko story may have sold 12-15k, but that's because it was easily the best part of Mononoke. The arc about the game involving different scents and such sold much worse I would think.
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PetrifiedJello



Joined: 11 Mar 2009
Posts: 3782
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 2:23 pm Reply with quote
Quote:
Leavitt noted that the type of anime helps determine how it is made and what kind of profits companies may get out of it.

Which appears to be excluded from the article. Can we get more info on this, if it's available?

Quote:
Leavitt explained that many of the top-ranking titles shown on television are not usually the titles popular in America (ie: Sazae-san and Doraemon).

How can these two series even be exampled when there's nothing like them currently (or historically?) in distribution to support a statement like this?
*pulls out a yellow card

Quote:
Noitamina ("Animation" spelled backwards)

A name probably suggested by Toshiharu Murata.

Quote:
Leavitt compared the Noitamina block to "Toonami" and "Adult Swim" on American TV, and gave a brief history of each.

I get the gist on why the Noitamina block was compared, but I would think the results wouldn't include any useful results.

Firstly, there would only be three years of data regarding the Toonami comparison, given its life ended in 2008 and many would challenge the content offered (ie, Teen Titans) prior to its demise.

Secondly, the lineup of Adult Swim changed so often, DVRs just gave up trying to record. If the results of the comparison was tracking ratings on specific blocks of time, this could be very misleading since the content change would have an affect on the ratings. In addition to this, not all content was anime.

It would be interesting to see what conclusions were drawn from this comparison.

Quote:
Leavitt concluded the panel by talking about another recent experiment in anime, the "Anime no Chikara" block, which has aired So-Ra-No-Wo-To, Senkō no Night Raid, and Occult Academy.

In reading the descriptions of each of these series, I couldn't help but get a feeling fans would say they're experiencing an "endless 8"-ish feel to the block. 3 series which borderline a similar theme. What an odd experiment to run.
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Megiddo



Joined: 24 Aug 2005
Posts: 8038
Location: IL
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 2:26 pm Reply with quote
What's the "similar theme" between the three series PJ? Cause I don't really see any.
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PetrifiedJello



Joined: 11 Mar 2009
Posts: 3782
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 2:39 pm Reply with quote
Megiddo wrote:
What's the "similar theme" between the three series PJ? Cause I don't really see any.

The military-esque theme was what caught my attention.

Not that the delivery is the same, but it would be like watching 3 different magical girl shows back-to-back. I would think the lack of variety would fizzle out quickly.
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Megiddo



Joined: 24 Aug 2005
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 2:45 pm Reply with quote
I can't say I know of any military influence in Occult Academy. The other two, obviously yes.
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