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EP. REVIEW: Angolmois: Record of Mongol Invasion


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Lemonchest
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 10:49 am Reply with quote
"Hey guys: you know how some shows use that filter to show a scene is taking place in the past? Well since our show is set in the past; what if we used it for the whole thing!? There isn't a single thing wrong with this idea!"
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S0crates
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 11:03 am Reply with quote
"That moment you seduced a guy to your will, but it turns out he just said yes to get you out of his face"
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Joshua Zarate
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 12:52 pm Reply with quote
I’m having an enjoyable time with this series. The characters are engaging, the animation during fight scenes is nicely detailed and the plot is intriguing. I don’t watch a lot of period pieces for any kind of media, but I’m liking this one so far and I hope that the staff can keep it up. I personally didn’t even notice the filter until it was mentioned in the reviews, so I guess it’s not a big issue for me.
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Key
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 23, 2018 9:58 pm Reply with quote
Finally got to watching the second episode, and noticed a distinct error in Crunchyroll's subtitles. At the 13:08 mark they list this as the "11th year of the Bumei era," but that would be at least two centuries off since it would be referring to 1479. It's actually supposed to be Bun'ei era, as the 11th year of that would be 1274, which is when the first Mongol invasion was attempted. It even sounds more like they're saying Bun'ei in the Japanese dub.

Other than that, I'm liking this series quite a bit so far. They're sticking pretty close to the actual history. (Sou Sukekuni went down just as the histories dictate, and that was the first experience of the Japanese with the both the Mongol's "hail of arrows" tactic and their bombs.)
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SHD



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PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2018 4:15 pm Reply with quote
Key wrote:
Finally got to watching the second episode, and noticed a distinct error in Crunchyroll's subtitles. At the 13:08 mark they list this as the "11th year of the Bumei era," but that would be at least two centuries off since it would be referring to 1479. It's actually supposed to be Bun'ei era, as the 11th year of that would be 1274, which is when the first Mongol invasion was attempted. It even sounds more like they're saying Bun'ei in the Japanese dub.

They do say "Bun'ei" in Japanese, not Bumei (that should be Bunmei, anyway). Someone should let them know.

I'm also enjoying the show so far, although 3 episodes in I'm not much of a fan of the shoehorned in romantic tension between Jinzaburou and Teruhi... I also got to realize that I liked Jinzaburou a lot more when he was called Shimazu Toyohisa and starred in Drifters. I hope Jinzaburou will find his own personality as time goes on because as far as unlikely heroic(?) murder machines who are natural born leaders with a taste for blood, talent for inspiring speeches, and fondness for red clothing go, Jinzaburou is no match for Toyo so far.
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Yttrbio
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2018 5:28 pm Reply with quote
I was a little disappointed at the portrayal of the exiles fighting as being practically supernatural. Given that the story is about facing overwhelming odds, our lead needs to be shown to have at least some vulnerability to massive opposition, as opposed to being an excellent horse archer and unstoppable killing machine.
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brynhild



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PostPosted: Tue Jul 24, 2018 11:47 pm Reply with quote
Key wrote:
Finally got to watching the second episode, and noticed a distinct error in Crunchyroll's subtitles. At the 13:08 mark they list this as the "11th year of the Bumei era," but that would be at least two centuries off since it would be referring to 1479. It's actually supposed to be Bun'ei era, as the 11th year of that would be 1274, which is when the first Mongol invasion was attempted. It even sounds more like they're saying Bun'ei in the Japanese dub.

Other than that, I'm liking this series quite a bit so far. They're sticking pretty close to the actual history. (Sou Sukekuni went down just as the histories dictate, and that was the first experience of the Japanese with the both the Mongol's "hail of arrows" tactic and their bombs.)


I just got around to watching the second episode, and it looks as if they've since corrected that subtitle: Screenshot
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yuna49



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PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2018 7:31 am Reply with quote
Lemonchest wrote:
"Hey guys: you know how some shows use that filter to show a scene is taking place in the past? Well since our show is set in the past; what if we used it for the whole thing!? There isn't a single thing wrong with this idea!"


What's especially annoying is that there are much less distracting ways to include this "parchment" effect. Nakamura Kenji used this technique in Mononoke. He blended the filter into the background so it was much more subtle. These guys just drop the filter on top of the whole image. It's especially annoying when they pan the camera and the filter remains fixed.
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phia_one



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PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2018 9:15 am Reply with quote
Episode 3

I'm guessing they decided not to show Kuchii and Co. trying to recover the heads for budget reasons. Thought that was a cop out. "Let's show this really tense moment where our heroes have to get to the center"... Only to cut away and then have someone else go "Hey guys they did it!"

Teruhi appears to be fascinated and afraid of Kuchii at the same time, but the show doesn't make this the main focus of her character which I appreciate. But damn, what a way to end an episode!
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Gina Szanboti



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PostPosted: Fri Jul 27, 2018 7:18 pm Reply with quote
Key wrote:
Finally got to watching the second episode, and noticed a distinct error in Crunchyroll's subtitles.

I pointed out the same error in the first episode in the Preview Guide ("Speaking of the subs, they say, "The 11th year of the Bunmei era," but the Bunmei era was 1469–1487. The first invasion was during the Bun'ei era (also not the "Ben'ei" era in the Guide's series' synopsis)."). Did Crunchyroll go back and change that as well (I don't feel like looking it up)?

Kuchii, episode 3 wrote:
He fought with all his strength to win the victory and then he failed and died. It was a proud death, but he did not die for pride.

This kind of leaped out at me, since just yesterday I was reading about "The Nobility of Failure: Tragic Heroes in the History of Japan" by Ivan Morris, discussing the Japanese love of lost causes. Smile
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yuna49



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2018 9:01 am Reply with quote
phia_one wrote:
Teruhi appears to be fascinated and afraid of Kuchii at the same time, but the show doesn't make this the main focus of her character which I appreciate. But damn, what a way to end an episode!

She approaches Kuchii while he is sleeping, and it looks as though she is about to kiss him. Then the camera cuts away leaving us wondering what the hell she was doing.

Isn't she like 16 and he 30-something? These age-gap romances are pretty common in anime, but probably less common in real life. At least the current Lupin writers know to spoiler[depict Ami's crush on Lupin for what it is, not a serious romance. And, of course, there's always Fujiko.]
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Key
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2018 10:01 am Reply with quote
^
You're forgetting the relative time periods, which is why the comparison you make isn't valid. In many earlier eras all across the world, age gaps like that would have been commonplace for practical reasons. These days we look more askance at it because the political and economic motivations for it aren't (usually) as compelling.
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yuna49



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PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2018 10:21 am Reply with quote
No, I realize that age gaps were more common in earlier historical periods, but even modern shows include such pairings. Think back to Hibito and the Russian girl in Uchuu Kyoudai. In Amaama to Inazuma the relationship between the male teacher and his female student apparently progresses in the manga. (Not to mention the more controversial stories like Usagi Drop and Kurenai.) If anime illuminates Japanese culture, it suggests that they are more open to these sorts of relationships than in the West.

My parents, as it turns out, had a twelve-year gap. He was thirty, and she eighteen, but they met in 1930. I wondered about this more and more as I aged; when I was thirty in 1979, I didn't see the appeal. I think that experience is why I'm more attuned to this trope than other viewers.
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Lemonchest
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2018 4:36 am Reply with quote
You could argue it's meant to reflect the social mores of the time. Alternatively
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Key
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 29, 2018 9:39 am Reply with quote
yuna49 wrote:
No, I realize that age gaps were more common in earlier historical periods, but even modern shows include such pairings. Think back to Hibito and the Russian girl in Uchuu Kyoudai. In Amaama to Inazuma the relationship between the male teacher and his female student apparently progresses in the manga. (Not to mention the more controversial stories like Usagi Drop and Kurenai.) If anime illuminates Japanese culture, it suggests that they are more open to these sorts of relationships than in the West.

My parents, as it turns out, had a twelve-year gap. He was thirty, and she eighteen, but they met in 1930. I wondered about this more and more as I aged; when I was thirty in 1979, I didn't see the appeal. I think that experience is why I'm more attuned to this trope than other viewers.

For modern stuff you have to factor in the "writer's fantasy" factor.
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