Forum - View topic
NEWS: Anime Production Firm Office Ao Filed for Bankruptcy


Goto page 1, 2  Next

Note: this is the discussion thread for this article

Anime News Network Forum Index -> Site-related -> Talkback
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Big Hed



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 1607
Location: Melbourne, Australia
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 6:55 am Reply with quote
From the looks of things in the encyclopedia, most of AO's work was on in-between animation. Not exactly comforting to see another studio file so quickly after TAC, but at least in both instances neither seems to have done any major work recently. Seems like a case of the fat being trimmed to me.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message My Anime My Manga
KAtchan15



Joined: 22 Dec 2006
Posts: 460
Location: NYC
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 7:04 am Reply with quote
Oh my...another one. This is really upsetting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jlaking



Joined: 02 Mar 2008
Posts: 212
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 7:28 am Reply with quote
Big Hed wrote:
Not exactly comforting to see another studio file so quickly after TAC


Actually AO's filing was 20 days before TAC's.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website My Anime
Big Hed



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 1607
Location: Melbourne, Australia
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 7:32 am Reply with quote
Oops, neglected to check the dates.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message My Anime My Manga
Paploo



Joined: 21 Nov 2006
Posts: 1875
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 9:27 am Reply with quote
I recall Justin mentioning in different ANNCasts that a number of Japanese animation companies were heading towards closing. Sad to see that coming true. Even if a company does focus on inbetweening, that's still problematic considering how many studios you'll see in a show's credits- most anime seem to be the result of one or two studios doing the preproduction work and several working together to get the actual production [inbetweeninging, colouring, editing, distributing etc] done.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Gasero



Joined: 24 Jul 2009
Posts: 843
Location: MI, USA
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 9:45 am Reply with quote
I was hoping this wouldn't be a trend, but it seems like it could be becoming one if this keeps up. The sad part is that they filed before TAC and its just not becoming known afterward.

Hopefully animation studios in Japan will be more inclined to focus on quality over quantity real soon. A couple years have gone by without any new anime keeping my interest.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address MSN Messenger
Muppe



Joined: 09 Dec 2007
Posts: 23
Location: Norway
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 9:59 am Reply with quote
Gasero wrote:
Hopefully animation studios in Japan will be more inclined to focus on quality over quantity real soon. A couple years have gone by without any new anime keeping my interest.


Personally I think they will focus even more on shows that sell enough to keep them up and running, playing it safe with shows that atleast the otaku crowd will pick up. So Look forward to even more fanservice and moe shows,
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Tyrenol



Joined: 13 Sep 2005
Posts: 398
Location: Northern California
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 10:03 am Reply with quote
Gasero wrote:
Hopefully animation studios in Japan will be more inclined to focus on quality over quantity real soon. A couple years have gone by without any new anime keeping my interest.


I'm at the crossroad between agreeing with you and saying "And Nothing Of Value Had Been Lost."

But it goes back to one of my earlier arguments: None of this would've happened if people actually spent their money on actual MARKET RESEARCH, finding out what people want overall (and especially finding out what people outside of Asia want overall) as oppose to making money off the pessimism and "escapaholism" of NEETs and hikkikomori-tachi; then hoping it would last. Idea

I thought Grenadier was a good show, so of course it's sad to see companies with that much potential go.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
walw6pK4Alo



Joined: 12 Mar 2008
Posts: 9294
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 10:47 am Reply with quote
Gasero wrote:
I was hoping this wouldn't be a trend, but it seems like it could be becoming one if this keeps up. The sad part is that they filed before TAC and its just not becoming known afterward.

Hopefully animation studios in Japan will be more inclined to focus on quality over quantity real soon. A couple years have gone by without any new anime keeping my interest.


This is hardly the first time that the anime industry has seen so many studios closing.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
ArsenicSteel



Joined: 12 Jan 2010
Posts: 2370
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 11:43 am Reply with quote
Quote:

But it goes back to one of my earlier arguments: None of this would've happened if people actually spent their money on actual MARKET RESEARCH, finding out what people want overall (
Quote:
and especially finding out what people outside of Asia want overall
) as oppose to making money off the pessimism and "escapaholism" of NEETs and hikkikomori-tachi; then hoping it would last. Idea


I guess you are not even talking about AO at all since their catalog is not really reflective of your supposed problems.

Good luck with the bolded part. If people outside of Japan want something specifically that anime does not offer then those people best go after their domestic producers of animation.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Gasero



Joined: 24 Jul 2009
Posts: 843
Location: MI, USA
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 12:21 pm Reply with quote
walw6pK4Alo wrote:
Gasero wrote:
I was hoping this wouldn't be a trend, but it seems like it could be becoming one if this keeps up. The sad part is that they filed before TAC and its just not becoming known afterward.

Hopefully animation studios in Japan will be more inclined to focus on quality over quantity real soon. A couple years have gone by without any new anime keeping my interest.


This is hardly the first time that the anime industry has seen so many studios closing.

Sure, but it might be the first time the economy doesn't allow a healthy recovery from it. Times have changed greatly.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address MSN Messenger
agila61



Joined: 22 Feb 2009
Posts: 3213
Location: NE Ohio
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 12:34 pm Reply with quote
Big Hed wrote:
From the looks of things in the encyclopedia, most of AO's work was on in-between animation. Not exactly comforting to see another studio file so quickly after TAC, but at least in both instances neither seems to have done any major work recently. Seems like a case of the fat being trimmed to me.


Studios relying primarily on work outsourced from lead production studios are exactly where we'd expect a shake-out to hit first, as the lead production studios have less need to outsource if their total output drops.

And of course, inbetween animation is normally where key animators come from, so evidence that there is less work for inbetween animators in Japan is hardly comforting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Big Hed



Joined: 04 May 2006
Posts: 1607
Location: Melbourne, Australia
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 1:03 pm Reply with quote
agila61 wrote:
Studios relying primarily on work outsourced from lead production studios are exactly where we'd expect a shake-out to hit first, as the lead production studios have less need to outsource if their total output drops.


Precisely what I meant. And while I agree that the loss of work is not a good thing, as I think was said in the TAC thread, this may simply be a result of competition reacting to the realities of consumer demand. Something's got to give, and better it be an in-between studio than something larger.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message My Anime My Manga
agila61



Joined: 22 Feb 2009
Posts: 3213
Location: NE Ohio
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 1:27 pm Reply with quote
Big Hed wrote:
agila61 wrote:
Studios relying primarily on work outsourced from lead production studios are exactly where we'd expect a shake-out to hit first, as the lead production studios have less need to outsource if their total output drops.


Precisely what I meant. And while I agree that the loss of work is not a good thing, as I think was said in the TAC thread, this may simply be a result of competition reacting to the realities of consumer demand. Something's got to give, and better it be an in-between studio than something larger.


Better in the sense that a later industry collapse from a lack of people able to do the core work is better than a quick industry collapse from financial crisis in the biggest studios?

Yes, but a choice between long term chronic decline and immediate collapse is not a happy one.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
matrixdude



Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 71
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2010 1:55 pm Reply with quote
It sucks that more in-between anime firms are going out of business, but maybe it'll help reduce the amount of anime made every season. Who really needs more moe every season? Given the choice between a long term decline and an immediate collapse I'd say the collapse is a better one because it gets rid of all the old companies that are well established and just churn out whatever is in fad, like moe or generic shonen fantasy. That, and it allows for a faster recovery.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic    Anime News Network Forum Index -> Site-related -> Talkback All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group