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NEWS: Oldest Surviving Japanese TV Anime's Film Discovered


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FlamingFirewire



Joined: 03 Jun 2013
Posts: 435
PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 9:04 pm Reply with quote
Wow, someone needs to screen cap this one so that we can all see what it's like over the pond! It's amazing something like this even exists considering how poorly materials back then were treated.

Always good to hear more about the history of anime and be able to relive the past just a bit.
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qashairy



Joined: 05 Nov 2008
Posts: 54
PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 9:04 pm Reply with quote
HD remaster possible?
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AiddonValentine



Joined: 07 Aug 2006
Posts: 1977
PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 9:07 pm Reply with quote
man, it is quite amazing at how much art has been lost due to time. If I remember right, roughly 70%+ of all films made before 1960 are gone. That is kind of terrifying.
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Otaku_X



Joined: 25 Nov 2008
Posts: 298
PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 9:19 pm Reply with quote
Oh, this BETTER get fansubbed. I want it so hard.
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mgosdin



Joined: 17 Jul 2011
Posts: 1299
Location: Kissimmee, Florida, USA
PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 9:23 pm Reply with quote
It's air date makes it 11 days older than me. Amazing that it survived being warehoused for so long.

It would be nice for it to eventually be streamed so we all can see it.

Mark Gosdin
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StormSky92





PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 9:53 pm Reply with quote
Damn, I hope this gets a fansub. I'd love to see it.
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walw6pK4Alo



Joined: 12 Mar 2008
Posts: 9321
PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 10:07 pm Reply with quote
AiddonValentine wrote:
man, it is quite amazing at how much art has been lost due to time. If I remember right, roughly 70%+ of all films made before 1960 are gone. That is kind of terrifying.


I'd imagine a good lot of those were lost in the wars, as Hugo demonstrates that nearly an entire man's work can be suddenly gone. None of Theda Bara's films are preserved. Post wars, I'm sure survival rates fare much better.

For those clamoring about fansubs, do you go out of your way to regularly watch ancient anime? Beyond historical appreciation, I find it kind of hard to really care about the stories and characters, it's just more about "wow, this was made in X year", which was most of what I got out of Hakujaden. Then again, 9 minutes is a small pill to swallow.
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PurpleWarrior13



Joined: 05 Sep 2009
Posts: 1910
PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 10:34 pm Reply with quote
I'm just interested in seeing it from a historical perspective.

For the record, pretty much all American films made after the silent era still exist, with some exceptions, but it's rare for a US film made after 1930 to be completely lost (a few early talkies are gone though, notably some Spanish-language ones). Now US silent films however...you'd be surprised at how few survive.
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dan9999



Joined: 25 Oct 2011
Posts: 648
PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 10:54 pm Reply with quote
walw6pK4Alo wrote:

For those clamoring about fansubs, do you go out of your way to regularly watch ancient anime? Beyond historical appreciation, I find it kind of hard to really care about the stories and characters, it's just more about "wow, this was made in X year", which was most of what I got out of Hakujaden. Then again, 9 minutes is a small pill to swallow.


What should we consider ancient? This kind of short film with historical value? If this, its more historical appreciation. I am positve you are referring to this.

Or ancient as in anime from them 60s, 70s, 80s? If this, then I love older anime, not because I was born in those eras thou, because I genuinely love them, my fav anime from the 80s without doubt.

I regularly watch as much older anime as I can and as time permits, I have watched quite a lot actually, starting indeed with the very same Atom series mentioned all they way back in the early 60s, and then to todays anime, even moe for good measure .... .... .... ....

The good thing is I dont need fansubs yes or yes, I can manage ok, so that helps to not skip lot of amazing anime, mainly older, that is not fansubbed, not even mentioning released outside Japan.


Last edited by dan9999 on Sat Jun 15, 2013 11:03 pm; edited 1 time in total
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mdo7



Joined: 23 May 2007
Posts: 5995
Location: Cypress, Texas, USA
PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 10:59 pm Reply with quote
AiddonValentine wrote:
man, it is quite amazing at how much art has been lost due to time. If I remember right, roughly 70%+ of all films made before 1960 are gone. That is kind of terrifying.


Not all of it, luckily couple of anime from 1930's did survived I know because have you seen The Roots of Japanese anime, this one has the oldest anime going back to 1930's.

PurpleWarrior13 wrote:
I'm just interested in seeing it from a historical perspective.

For the record, pretty much all American films made after the silent era still exist, with some exceptions, but it's rare for a US film made after 1930 to be completely lost (a few early talkies are gone though, notably some Spanish-language ones). Now US silent films however...you'd be surprised at how few survive.


Yes it's unfortunate, a lot of silent era films were either lost or scrapped for couple of reasons. I'll quote Wikipedia about lost films

Wikipedia wrote:
Many early motion pictures are lost because the nitrate film used for nearly all 35 mm negatives and prints made before 1952 is highly flammable. When in very badly deteriorated condition and improperly stored (e.g., in a sun-baked shed), it can even spontaneously combust. Fires have destroyed entire archives of films. For example, a storage vault fire in 1937 destroyed all the original negatives of Fox Pictures' pre-1935 films. A 1967 MGM Vault fire resulted in the loss of hundreds more silent films and early talkies. Nitrate film is chemically unstable and over time can decay into a sticky mass or a powder akin to gunpowder. This process can be very unpredictable: some nitrate film from the 1890s is still in good condition today, while some much later nitrate had to be scrapped as unsalvageable when it was barely twenty years old. Much depends on the environment in which it is stored. Ideal conditions of low temperature, low humidity and adequate ventilation can preserve nitrate film for centuries, but in practice the storage conditions were usually far from ideal.

Before the eras of television and later home video, films were viewed as having little future value when their theatrical runs ended. Thus, again, many were deliberately destroyed to save the space and cost of storage; many were recycled for their silver content. Many Technicolor two-color negatives from the 1920s and 1930s were thrown out when the studios refused to reclaim their films, still being held by Technicolor in its vaults. Some prints were sold either intact or broken into short clips to individuals who bought early novelty home projection machines and wanted scenes from their favorite movies to play for guests or family members.



This is why a lot of films back during the silent era and before VHS, DVDs, Blu-rays existed was lost.

Anyway back on topic: Glad they found another lost anime, it's amazing they found it intact. Very Happy


Last edited by mdo7 on Sun Jun 16, 2013 11:28 am; edited 1 time in total
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rheiders



Joined: 05 Jul 2011
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 11:13 pm Reply with quote
I am very interested in seeing this from a historical and artistic perspective. Learning more about the history of this art form I love so much is always great! I hope it gets fansubbed.
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Apollo-kun



Joined: 11 Feb 2010
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 12:05 am Reply with quote
Huh, wasn't "Hermit's Village" considered to be the earliest before this? I read about that when I was 12-ish in a Fred Patten book back in the mid-2000's.
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Snomaster1
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Joined: 31 Aug 2011
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 12:16 am Reply with quote
Incredible! The new oldest surviving TV anime is going to be a fascinating find. I hope it comes here. I'd love to see it.
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Jayhosh



Joined: 24 May 2013
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Location: Millmont, Pennsylvania
PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 1:12 am Reply with quote
dan9999 wrote:
walw6pK4Alo wrote:

For those clamoring about fansubs, do you go out of your way to regularly watch ancient anime? Beyond historical appreciation, I find it kind of hard to really care about the stories and characters, it's just more about "wow, this was made in X year", which was most of what I got out of Hakujaden. Then again, 9 minutes is a small pill to swallow.


What should we consider ancient? This kind of short film with historical value? If this, its more historical appreciation. I am positve you are referring to this.

Or ancient as in anime from them 60s, 70s, 80s? If this, then I love older anime, not because I was born in those eras thou, because I genuinely love them, my favorite anime from the 80s without doubt.

I regularly watch as much older anime as I can and as time permits, I have watched quite a lot actually, starting indeed with the very same Atom series mentioned all they way back in the early 60s, and then to todays anime, even moe for good measure .... .... .... ....

The good thing is I don't need fansubs yes or yes, I can manage ok, so that helps to not skip lot of amazing anime, mainly older, that is not fansubbed, not even mentioning released outside Japan.


Have you seen Future Boy Conan? That's a fantastic late 70's anime that definitely does not get the recognition it deserves. Too many people who watch anime are afraid to venture out past anything pre 2000's anymore (except for the obvious popular titles like DBZ, Sailor Moon, Pokemon, Evangelion etc.). They're too "hip" for that I guess. They'd be surprised at how many classics they miss out on.
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E-Master



Joined: 21 Aug 2005
Posts: 471
PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 1:44 am Reply with quote
Great discovery! I like it when an incredibly rare anime from the past is found so that way we and future generations can be able to watch it. It's a real blessing that this film was not forever lost in time. It be even more super if the live action films "Japanese King Kong" & "King Kong Appears in Edo" were discovered. An unlikely chance for those two films to be found, but you can never know cause there's no solid evidence that either film was destroyed.
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