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Lord Geo



Joined: 18 Sep 2005
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Location: North Brunswick, New Jersey
PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 11:26 am Reply with quote
The anime industry in Japan is intensely risk-averse at times, so it only made sense that late-night wound up becoming the de facto home for the majority of productions. I've been working on a panel about how the late-night anime infomercial became what it is now, and I've definitely learned some interesting things. For example, while this concept didn't really start until late-1996 (with Those Who Hunt Elves), it wasn't until 2004 that it really became a regular thing. Simultaneously, 2004 was also the last year that late-night actually was the home to year-plus long series debuting, with stuff like Monkey Turn & Monster being some of the last ones (& even then Monkey Turn was split up into two seasons, even though there was no gap in airing). Ever since then, late-night's mainly been for 1 or 2 cour series, with only the past few years having seen a slight resurgence in longer series, like Ushio & Tora or JoJo Part 4.

Also, Justin didn't really bring up the prime time slots, which are more or less the middle ground, as they likely are produced more like daytime slots, unlike late-night, but tend to only plan out for either six months or an entire year at a time, instead of the "as long as it sells" methodology. I remember back when series like Fullmetal Alchemist [2003], Gundam Seed, & Blood+ were airing, and the time slot that they all ran in was considered this holy grail time slot, because it was a 6 p.m. prime time slot on Saturdays, i.e. this was "mainstream television" in Japan. Technically, this slot still exists, though it moved over to Sundays at 5 p.m. years back, but it's interesting that no one has since given titles like FMA: Brotherhood, Magi, Yamato 2199, Arslan, Haikyuu!, or My Hero Academia (the 1st season, at least) the same kind of reverence, even though they have essentially are the successors to that same "mainstream" time slot that FMA, Seed, & Blood+ ran in.
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Scalfin



Joined: 18 May 2008
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 12:04 pm Reply with quote
I'm more surprised that the extreme shonen successes like MHA and AoT aren't converted to continuous production and daytime slots after their first seasons.
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Lord Geo



Joined: 18 Sep 2005
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 1:05 pm Reply with quote
I'd imagine that the shift from production committee style to daytime style is just too difficult to transition to, at least without any sort of break needed. Madhouse's Hunter X Hunter anime did the reverse, switching from daytime to late-night for it's last six months or so, but that was moving from a long-running engagement to just a few more months to finish things up. Moving from a short-term plan to a long-running one would pretty much require instantaneous success from Episode 1 or so, if only to give the switch time to actually happen.
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Pepperidge



Joined: 13 Sep 2003
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 1:14 pm Reply with quote
Scalfin wrote:
I'm more surprised that the extreme shonen successes like MHA and AoT aren't converted to continuous production and daytime slots after their first seasons.


Probably worth mentioning that MHA is not a late night show and runs in an early evening slot. It seems to be an interesting exception in that regard as a multi-season production. AoT is actually moving to an 11:00pm or 11:30pm slot on NHK for its third season, which I understand is a bit of a different situation compared to regular late night shows.
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bigivel



Joined: 05 Nov 2007
Posts: 532
PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 1:18 pm Reply with quote
Again with the wrong equivalence. Night time anime being so much more than long running anime isn't equivalent to long running anime being scarce or a dying thing.

In fact right now(with 1 to 3 series margin of error) is the time with most long running anime. In fact at any given time the number of long running is close to the same as short running. Is just the case that as the number of long running have increased, the number of short running have also increased, but around 4 times more.

About the particular case of shonen jump magazine case, they have in fact decreased a little the number of long running, but not as much as people think(around less 2 series in a given time), the other difference is that right now more anime are being made of series of the magazine, and this new numbers are short running.
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AksaraKishou



Joined: 16 May 2015
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 2:00 pm Reply with quote
Quote:
informercials for for


Just a heads up.
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ultimatehaki



Joined: 27 Oct 2012
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 2:11 pm Reply with quote
Pepperidge wrote:
Scalfin wrote:
I'm more surprised that the extreme shonen successes like MHA and AoT aren't converted to continuous production and daytime slots after their first seasons.


Probably worth mentioning that MHA is not a late night show and runs in an early evening slot. It seems to be an interesting exception in that regard as a multi-season production. AoT is actually moving to an 11:00pm or 11:30pm slot on NHK for its third season, which I understand is a bit of a different situation compared to regular late night shows.


Also AoT is a monthly manga, there's no way it could run continuously week after week until it ends. One piece has had horrendous pacing problems for years now and it's a weekly manga.
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Jonny Mendes



Joined: 17 Oct 2014
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 2:24 pm Reply with quote
Scalfin wrote:
I'm more surprised that the extreme shonen successes like MHA and AoT aren't converted to continuous production and daytime slots after their first seasons.


Because One Piece have a direct involvement of Fuji TV is easy because the time slot already belongs to Fuji TV and Fuji TV is the main producer and can maintain the anime going as long they want.

MHA is more dependent of the wishes of Shueisha, manga sales, BD sales, etc. They don't have a big TV production partner like Fuji TV. So is safer to make season by season production than continuous production.

If one season is a bust in terms of manga sales, BD sales, etc the probability of another season is less.
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bigivel



Joined: 05 Nov 2007
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 2:48 pm Reply with quote
Jonny Mendes wrote:
Scalfin wrote:
I'm more surprised that the extreme shonen successes like MHA and AoT aren't converted to continuous production and daytime slots after their first seasons.


Because One Piece have a direct involvement of Fuji TV is easy because the time slot already belongs to Fuji TV and Fuji TV is the main producer and can maintain the anime going as long they want.

MHA is more dependent of the wishes of Shueisha, manga sales, BD sales, etc. They don't have a big TV production partner like Fuji TV. So is safer to make season by season production than continuous production.

If one season is a bust in terms of manga sales, BD sales, etc the probability of another season is less.


Nope, it doesnt has nothing to do with fuji tv, but toei animation. The timeslot of One Piece, gegege no kitaro(before dragon ball super) and precure are toei animation exclusive timeslots. Also normally toei animation has long running anime. My hero academia is made by Bones that really doesnt have the capacity for long running series. Note that the timeslot where my hero academia is, is a long running timeslot(right before Detective Conan) , that right now is doing 2 season series interchangeable. My hero academia and Time Bokan 24.
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Jonny Mendes



Joined: 17 Oct 2014
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 3:02 pm Reply with quote
bigivel wrote:
Jonny Mendes wrote:
Scalfin wrote:
I'm more surprised that the extreme shonen successes like MHA and AoT aren't converted to continuous production and daytime slots after their first seasons.


Because One Piece have a direct involvement of Fuji TV is easy because the time slot already belongs to Fuji TV and Fuji TV is the main producer and can maintain the anime going as long they want.

MHA is more dependent of the wishes of Shueisha, manga sales, BD sales, etc. They don't have a big TV production partner like Fuji TV. So is safer to make season by season production than continuous production.

If one season is a bust in terms of manga sales, BD sales, etc the probability of another season is less.


Nope, it doesnt has nothing to do with fuji tv, but toei animation. The timeslot of One Piece, gegege no kitaro(before dragon ball super) and precure are toei animation exclusive timeslots. Also normally toei animation has long running anime. My hero academia is made by Bones that really doesnt have the capacity for long running series. Note that the timeslot where my hero academia is, is a long running timeslot(right before Detective Conan) , that right now is doing 2 season series interchangeable. My hero academia and Time Bokan 24.


Fuji TV is one of the main Production partners like the studio Toei and the publisher Shueisha (Fuji TV is also one of the owners of Toei), So yes, Fuji TV is heavily involved in One Piece.

If Shueisha partner with a big tv station so that MHA become continuous production, and if Bones don't have the capacity, they would turn to another studio. But with Japanese TV disinvestment on anime time slots, the possibility is very thin. So we can only hope the new seasons can continue to appear.


Last edited by Jonny Mendes on Wed Apr 18, 2018 3:13 pm; edited 1 time in total
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MarshalBanana



Joined: 31 Aug 2014
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 3:03 pm Reply with quote
I wish One Piece took breaks between seasons, it got so bad there that they had to fit 1 chapter into an entire episode, because they didn't want to catch up and have to go on break.
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bigivel



Joined: 05 Nov 2007
Posts: 532
PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 3:16 pm Reply with quote
Jonny Mendes wrote:
bigivel wrote:
Jonny Mendes wrote:
Scalfin wrote:
I'm more surprised that the extreme shonen successes like MHA and AoT aren't converted to continuous production and daytime slots after their first seasons.


Because One Piece have a direct involvement of Fuji TV is easy because the time slot already belongs to Fuji TV and Fuji TV is the main producer and can maintain the anime going as long they want.

MHA is more dependent of the wishes of Shueisha, manga sales, BD sales, etc. They don't have a big TV production partner like Fuji TV. So is safer to make season by season production than continuous production.

If one season is a bust in terms of manga sales, BD sales, etc the probability of another season is less.


Nope, it doesnt has nothing to do with fuji tv, but toei animation. The timeslot of One Piece, gegege no kitaro(before dragon ball super) and precure are toei animation exclusive timeslots. Also normally toei animation has long running anime. My hero academia is made by Bones that really doesnt have the capacity for long running series. Note that the timeslot where my hero academia is, is a long running timeslot(right before Detective Conan) , that right now is doing 2 season series interchangeable. My hero academia and Time Bokan 24.


Fuji TV is one of the main Production partners like Toei and Shueisha (Fuji is also one of the owners of Toei), So yes, Fuji TV is heavily involved in One Piece.


Fuji tv isnt one of the owners of Toei animation, Toei animation only has one owner, and right now it could be said that is just a formality, its parent company "Toei company".

Toei animation is in the public market and Fuji Tv bought some of its shares, 10% of them. Tv Asahi, the channel of Precure has 15% of the public shares, the parent company has 33.5%.

also there is no main production partners for One Piece, because there is only 3 production companies for the series: Toei animation, Fuji Tv, and an advertising company(dont remember the name righr now), this 3 are the only One Piece producers.
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Jonny Mendes



Joined: 17 Oct 2014
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 3:28 pm Reply with quote
bigivel wrote:

also there is no main production partners for One Piece, because there is only 3 production companies for the series: Toei animation, Fuji Tv, and an advertising company(dont remember the name righr now), this 3 are the only One Piece producers.


Shueisha is also one of the production companies. So that make 4 production companies (partners).
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bigivel



Joined: 05 Nov 2007
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 3:30 pm Reply with quote
MarshalBanana wrote:
I wish One Piece took breaks between seasons, it got so bad there that they had to fit 1 chapter into an entire episode, because they didn't want to catch up and have to go on break.


If One Piece had breaks it wouldnt adapt what is adapting, even less go what it seems to be the objective of the anime, full completion. There is only two examples of full completion of big series(none of them as big as One Piece), with breaks, one assured to have full complete adaptation but it started when the manga was almost at the end(Major) and the other was on the chopping block but luckily was popular enough during its breaks to have various continuations(Gintama). Ah you ja e a third, Fairy Tail, that was plannwd to not have breaks, but a producer(satelight anime studio) left the projecy and they had to find a replacement(bridge), then it ended again, and luckily will get a final season to complete the series.

Though, none of these have 88 volumes of material and continuing, and the adaptation started as earlier as the 10th volume.
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bigivel



Joined: 05 Nov 2007
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 18, 2018 3:33 pm Reply with quote
Jonny Mendes wrote:
bigivel wrote:

also there is no main production partners for One Piece, because there is only 3 production companies for the series: Toei animation, Fuji Tv, and an advertising company(dont remember the name righr now), this 3 are the only One Piece producers.


Shueisha is also one of the production companies. So that make 4 production companies (partners).


Nope, Shueisha isnt one of the producers for One Piece anime, but a right owner that gave the adaptation rights to Toei animation. The only thing they are obliged to do is receive royalties from Toei animation.
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