Forum - View topic
NEWS: Anime Architecture Book Available For Pre-Order




Note: this is the discussion thread for this article

Anime News Network Forum Index -> Site-related -> Talkback
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
AkumaChef



Joined: 10 Jan 2019
Posts: 583
PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2020 2:22 pm Reply with quote
The tiny photographs in the article don't do this book justice, but the images on the official site are amazing. This book is the perfect example of what I love about hand-drawn hand-painted animation, especially backgrounds. There is so much detail in every one of those pictures which we rarely see with digipaint and 3D CGI. Even an empty stretch of gray asphalt highway has detail and character when it's painted by hand, whereas with digital (2 or 3D) the detail is rarely there.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
reanimator



Joined: 25 Nov 2007
Posts: 1316
PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2020 6:35 pm Reply with quote
I guess the wait is over. Les Jardins des Pilotes, the non-profit organization who have been exhibited the artworks under "Proto Anime Cut" in art gallery in Europe since 2011.

Looking at the description, the publishers did good job describing each piece's size, medium, and behind-the-scene.

AkumaChef wrote:
There is so much detail in every one of those pictures which we rarely see with digipaint and 3D CGI. Even an empty stretch of gray asphalt highway has detail and character when it's painted by hand, whereas with digital (2 or 3D) the detail is rarely there.


I think you're unfairly comparing Theatrical production versus TV production. More Details means more time.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
AkumaChef



Joined: 10 Jan 2019
Posts: 583
PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2020 7:43 pm Reply with quote
reanimator wrote:

I think you're unfairly comparing Theatrical production versus TV production. More Details means more time.


That's fair to an extent--the examples in that book certainly are high budget theatrical productions. But I think that even the lower-end TV anime still tends to have a more detail, generally speaking, compared to digital. But now as I write this I also need to correct my earlier statement at bit too. It's not just detail that I'm talking about, it's also imperfection. A lot of digital anime looks too "clean" if that makes any sense.

I suppose I'm guilty of colluding two different things here.
Regarding the detail, my theory goes like this: When an artist hand-draws and hand-paints cels they add little touches often without thinking. If someone is drawing a piece of wood they add the grain and maybe a knot here or there. A drawing of an alleyway might feature graffiti and stains from a leaky gutter, etc. Artists add those features as they draw naturally, it's not something that requires concious effort on their part to do. But when doing things digitally you do have to think about each and every one of those details. The result is that they are often omitted entirely, or perhaps they look a bit out of place or forced. In my opinion adding things like that seems to be almost automatic when a scene is hand-drawn but really isn't when it's done digitally.

The imperfection is interesting too. A hand-drawn straight line is never truly straight but a digitally drawn ones are. Hand-drawn shadows aren't perfect but 3D modeled ones are. But that's the way it is in real life too. If we consider a building, for example: in the real world it won't look perfectly square--there is some degree of imperfection in its angles because it's not built to perfect standards. Likewise the color of its walls won't look like someone used the "paint bucket" tool to paint it either--it will have slightly different colors in different places because the lighting isn't perfectly uniform, because of the affects of weather, smog, etc. A lot of digital anime--especially during the early days of digipaint and 3D--simply looks too perfect. The same could be said for early 3D video games as well. Of course those things are improving with time but I don't think that digital has really overcome the advantage that "manual" art has. You can even take a super-high-budget theatrical anime--Ghost in the Shell Innocence, for example--and find examples those problems.

Of course imperfections aren't always a good thing either. I have the Perfect Collection Nadia LD box set. Many of the episodes within have some pretty obvious issues--a couple times objects like a hair or a staple are visible in frame, accidentaly left on top of or between cels when they were photographed. Other times you can tell that the stack of cels weren't properly held flat when photographed.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
reanimator



Joined: 25 Nov 2007
Posts: 1316
PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2020 10:46 pm Reply with quote
Yes, digital drawing and painting are too perfect and both lack "brushstroke" from the artist. It's the trade-off of having fast turn over for anime production.

I'm not too sure about artist thinking consciously about adding details with digital. I think it's all depends on Art Director trying to match Director's vision.

At one end, we have Makoto Shinkai's digital paint over photo method vs traditional painting method at the other end. Traditional method requires disciplined, meticulous planning while digital method is UNDO the details & textures when things don't look right.

I guess it depends on software, but I think digital paint came pretty far when it comes to simulating texture and transparency of water-based paint (poster color) and pencil. Is it perfect? Not yet, but it's hard to tell to normal people who don't pay much attention.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Reply to topic    Anime News Network Forum Index -> Site-related -> Talkback All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group