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invalidname
Get off my lawn!Get off my lawn!


Joined: 11 Aug 2004
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 7:15 pm Reply with quote
Perhaps a point of comparison could be made to the Kickstarter campaign for Blossom Detective Holmes, an original anime-style production which raised just shy of $200,000 in March, 2018. The project is headed up by Steve Ahn, a veteran of Western animated productions Voltron Legendary Defender and The Legend of Korra, so the people involved are already coming from an animation business background. Also, how far does that $200K go? It’s just enough to fund three 6-minute episodes.
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Moonsaber
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Joined: 16 Jan 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 8:54 pm Reply with quote
Is it possible to Kickstart your own anime?

Yes!

If you are Kenichi Sonada. IE: If you know people.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/beanbandit/kenichi-sonodas-bean-bandit-new-anime-project
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Gina Szanboti



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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 10:34 pm Reply with quote
I'm still wondering how the Webtoon comic Noblesse managed to get both Korean and Japanese OVAs. Not to mention some of the characters showing up in a mobile game. It's not that it's a bad comic (the first couple seasons were really good, though lately it seems to have degenerated into a lot of swoosh-and-bam FX battles with less plot), just that I'd like to know which stars aligned to make that happen.
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Brand



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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2019 11:24 pm Reply with quote
Gina Szanboti wrote:
I'm still wondering how the Webtoon comic Noblesse managed to get both Korean and Japanese OVAs.


I'd have to search for some numbers but I am pretty sure it was one of (if not the) most popular webtoons at one time.
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Jadeliger



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 12:10 am Reply with quote
Would a company like Rooster Teeth be able to produce a kickstarted animated short for a webtoon? They must have producers and seem like they'd be able to work on this sort of idea.
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Gina Szanboti



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 12:10 am Reply with quote
^ ^ Oh it absolutely was, but as the article pointed out, it's extremely difficult and unlikely for anything to make the jump from webcomic to anime. And yet Noblesse did it twice, in two countries (and almost simultaneously, at that)! Both the fact that it happened, and the timing and logistics of it happening at all are kind of mind-boggling. I'd love to know more of the behind the scenes of how it came to pass.

It's still way early days in the comic, but one I would kill to see made into an anime is Love Advice from the Great Duke of Hell. In a year or two, once there's enough material, it seems like it would make a great anime. Smile
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OjaruFan2



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 12:28 am Reply with quote
Not to mention that most anime series are made as advertisement for something already available/very close to becoming available to the Japanese market (a manga, a video game, a toyline, etc.). I doubt very many American web comics are officially translated in Japanese, let alone released on physical books in Japan.

Quote:
Due to the current anime boom, virtually all of the anime studios in Japan are booked solid for the next 3-5 years.

When exactly did this "current anime boom" occur? Just curious.
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FukuchiChiisaia



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:25 am Reply with quote
Gina Szanboti wrote:
I'm still wondering how the Webtoon comic Noblesse managed to get both Korean and Japanese OVAs.


That's because Line Webtoon is behind them. In this context, they function like 'committee production', just like oridinary manga-to-anime production does in Japan. Naver Corporation in Tokyo is so big that they can establish connection to big anime studio for any anime contract.

They are so big that Line Webtoon, a merely web comic platform, can get an commercial slot in premiere TV time, even for country like Thailand and Indonesia.
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Lord Oink



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:36 am Reply with quote
OjaruFan2 wrote:
Not to mention that most anime series are made as advertisement for something already available/very close to becoming available to the Japanese market (a manga, a video game, a toyline, etc.). I doubt very many American web comics are officially translated in Japanese, let alone released on physical books in Japan.


American? No. But Chinese and Korean webcomics have their audience and market.
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switchgear1131



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:46 am Reply with quote
Jadeliger wrote:
Would a company like Rooster Teeth be able to produce a kickstarted animated short for a webtoon? They must have producers and seem like they'd be able to work on this sort of idea.


Of course they could. It is not even a question. Would they though, probably not. They have everything they need to do animations, because you know they make them. They've kickstarted feature films, they could do an animated project because they have everything in place already. They don't need to kickstart it though because they are a company and can fund those things just like they do with RWBY and Genlock.

You would have to convince them to make the animation short, which is unlikely at best. They don't really make outside big projects anymore.
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Scytalle
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 2:22 am Reply with quote
Jadeliger wrote:
Would a company like Rooster Teeth be able to produce a kickstarted animated short for a webtoon? They must have producers and seem like they'd be able to work on this sort of idea.


They absolutely could if they wanted to. They have the experience and resources to do so. However, I have a hard time believing they would actually ever do it.

Rooster Teeth grew out of Red vs. Blue which is probably the most ambitious machinima ever. They've written and produced a ton of original shows. I can't remember a time when they've ever adapted an existing work actually (though maybe someone can think of something I'm missing). The company prides itself on being able to write and produce shows that they are proud of. They have a lot of creative staff. I highly doubt they'd ever choose to adapt someone else's story when they could write their own. At the moment they have a lot of brand recognition from RWBY, so until the time when their audience starts shrinking big time, and partnering with an existing brand might make financial sense, I can't see it happening.
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Triltaison



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 3:34 am Reply with quote
OjaruFan2 wrote:
When exactly did this "current anime boom" occur? Just curious.


I'd say around about 2010, with 2012 being around the time production started to really ramp up and then 2013 putting the boom in full swing. It's been chugging along at a steady pace with more and more series every quarter.

This listing on ANN is a chronological list of all anime titles listed in the encyclopedia here. Just 2010 to the present is the first 15 pages (about 35% of the 42 total pages), and we still have a whole year of new entries that haven't gotten entries yet. For reference, the entire decade of the '70s is only pages 39 to 41, the '80s is 35 to 39, and the '90s is 28 to 35. It's a pretty big boom currently.
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Fenrin



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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 4:22 am Reply with quote
FukuchiChiisaia wrote:
Gina Szanboti wrote:
I'm still wondering how the Webtoon comic Noblesse managed to get both Korean and Japanese OVAs.


That's because Line Webtoon is behind them. In this context, they function like 'committee production', just like oridinary manga-to-anime production does in Japan. Naver Corporation in Tokyo is so big that they can establish connection to big anime studio for any anime contract.

They are so big that Line Webtoon, a merely web comic platform, can get an commercial slot in premiere TV time, even for country like Thailand and Indonesia.

This makes me wonder then, with Naver's influence, why didn't they pursue a full-blown series instead of just an OVA? With how popular Noblesse was at the time I can't imagine DVD sales being a major concern. And now with the huge popularity of Tower of God, another shonen-style series under Line Webtoon, I keep wondering why Naver is just sitting on all these potentially hit series.
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MarshalBanana



Joined: 31 Aug 2014
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 4:22 am Reply with quote
OjaruFan2 wrote:
Quote:
Due to the current anime boom, virtually all of the anime studios in Japan are booked solid for the next 3-5 years.

When exactly did this "current anime boom" occur? Just curious.
It's to do with worldwide streaming, and all the licensing fees that includes. The date I would assume is around 2013, as AOT was big on streaming services.
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AkumaChef



Joined: 10 Jan 2019
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 15, 2019 10:59 am Reply with quote
I find this a bit confusing. According to Justin's article the real crux of the problem is getting a skilled producer onboard. That makes sense. But why is finding a producer so difficult? It seems that this is a problem which can be solved with money: hire one. If none are willing to sign onto the project at a given price....offer more money.

The reason this puzzles me is that an ANN article--specifically the Dec. 13 2015 edition of the Mike Toole Show titled "The Anime Cult"--describes how private organizations, in this case various religious groups--commissioned custom anime. If those groups were able to hire producers then why could a kickstarter group not do so? I can see the answer being that it's very expensive to do so, but expensive is a very different answer than impossible.

Link to the article I was referencing:
animenewsnetwork.com/the-mike-toole-show/2015-12-13/.96470
....if things like THAT can get produced, then why not a webcomic based anime?
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