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INTEREST: A Profile of the Sparkling Life of Shojo Manga Pioneer Eiko Hanamura




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Blackiris_
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Joined: 06 Sep 2013
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 09, 2020 2:27 pm Reply with quote
Thank you for this article, Lynzee and Matthieu! Very much appreciated!
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FireChick



Joined: 26 Mar 2006
Posts: 1798
Location: United States
PostPosted: Wed Dec 09, 2020 2:31 pm Reply with quote
It's a shame none of her manga ever got translated or released in English in some way. Considering some companies are putting out classic manga now, I bet some people would love to get their hands on her work. May she rest in peace.
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shosakukan



Joined: 09 Jan 2014
Posts: 211
PostPosted: Wed Dec 09, 2020 9:36 pm Reply with quote
Lynzee Loveridge wrote:
Long before she was recognized for her art, Hanamura was known as Shobei Sagamiya and was the daughter from a long line of merchants.

Matthieu Pinon wrote:
Descendante d’une longue lignée de marchands, Shobei Sagamiya voit le jour en 1929, dans la ville de Kawagoe, à une quarantaine de kilomètres au nord-ouest de Tokyo.

It seems that Ms Loveridge and Mr Pinon relied on the Japanese Wikipedia article about Hanamura Eiko when they wrote their articles.
The writer of the Japanese Wikipedia article about Hanamura Eiko relied upon I have become a manga-ka!?, an autobiographical book written by Hanamura Eiko.
I conjecture that Ms Loveridge and Mr Pinon erroneously thought the '「相模屋庄兵衛」の名で代々続く商家に生まれる' part in the Japanese Wikipedia article meant 'Hanamura Eiko was born as a baby who had the childhood name "Sagamiya Shōbei" in a merchant family which had a long history,' or something along those lines.
But, actually, the '「相模屋庄兵衛」の名で代々続く商家に生まれる' part in the Japanese Wikipedia article means 'Hanamura Eiko was born in a merchant family of which successive male heads used the name "Sagamiya Shōbei".'
So, sentence structure-wise, '「相模屋庄兵衛」の名で' is connected to '代々続く'. Not to '生まれる'.
Actually, 'Sagamiya Shōbei' is the hereditary name/'title' of the male head of the merchant family in which Hanamura Eiko was born.
The part about 'Sagamiya Shōbei' in the the Japanese Wikipedia article and the quivalent part in the I have become a manga-ka!? book discuss male head(s) of the merchant family in question.
According to I have become a manga-ka!?, Sagamiya (the 'Sagamiya' part is the name of the shop, rather than a family name in the usual sense) was a pawnshop and inn, and Sagamiya Shōbei the 7th was a man who lived about in the Genroku period (1688-1704).
'***-ya' (the name of a shop) plus 'an archaic name' such as 'Sagamiya Shōbei' is a typical name of the male head of a merchant family in olden days.
Japanese novelist Kobayashi Nobuhiko was born in a merchant family which ran a famous confectionery shop since the Kyōhō period (1716-1736) in the Nihonbashi district of Edo/Tokyo, and he talks about Tachibanaya Yasuemon, the hereditary name of the male head of his merchant family in his autobiographical books. ('Tachibanaya Yasuemon', too, consists of '***-ya' and 'an archaic name'.) He has also said that he did not become Tachibanaya/Kobayashi Yasuemon the 10th because he became a literary writer and did not succeed his father as the head of his family business.
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octopodpie
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Joined: 02 May 2011
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Location: Washington State
PostPosted: Thu Dec 10, 2020 1:06 am Reply with quote
Thank you very much for the explanation, I'll also send it over to the French staff.
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shosakukan



Joined: 09 Jan 2014
Posts: 211
PostPosted: Tue Dec 15, 2020 9:55 am Reply with quote
octopodpie wrote:
Thank you very much for the explanation, I'll also send it over to the French staff.

It's a pleasure. And thank you for taking the trouble to send my explanation to the French staffers.


I have read the 21-emon manga by Fujiko F. Fujio in the original, and it is a science-fiction comedy manga of which principal characters are a family who runs a hotel which has a long history in Tokyo in the future (the 21st century which was imagined in a comedic science-fiction way in the 1960s).
'21-emon' is the name of the protagonist, and the '21' part in his name indicates that he will become the 21st head of his family business. His father is 20-emon. An ancestor of 21-emon started to run the hotel as their family business in the Edo period.
The '-emon' part of the name '21-emon' is a name constituent of which stylistic feel is archaic and Edo period-ish. The name of the hotel which the family runs, too, is archaic in Tokyo of the future.
The funniness of the eponymous hero's name and the manga's title is generated by his having a partly archaic Edo period-ish name despite his living in Tokyo in the scince-fictional future which even extraterrestrials as sightseers visit.

On my desk, there happens to be a scholarly reprint of Shunshoku Umegoyomi, a book by Edo-period writer Tamenaga Shunsui (1790-1844).
The colophon of Shunshoku Umegoyomi says:
Quote:
江戶 爲永春水著

同  柳川重信画

大内興立 十杉傳第五編 爲永春水著編
            全五册 出來

天保四年癸巳孟陽発販

江戶書房 西村屋与八
     大島屋傳右エ門

The publishers' names '西村屋与八' (Nishimuraya Yohachi) and '大島屋傳右エ門' (Ōshimaya Den'emon), too, are examples of '***-ya plus an archaic name'-style names which merchants used in olden days.
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